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Full text of "Compute! Magazine Issue 157"

ORGANIZE 
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Circle Reader Service Numlwr 258 




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Circle Reader Service Number 1 SI 



75e. ^'7-^5 



COIUIPUTE 



VOLUME 15, NO. 10, ISSUE 157 



OCTOBER 1993 



FEATURES 
8 

SUPiR RECORDER MACROS 

By Clifton Karnes 
Supercharge your desktop 

with this collection of 
essential Recorder macros, 

18 

TEST UB 

Edited by Mike Hudnall 

Ten great Windows persona 

information managers, 

66 

DATA UNDER PRESSURE 

By Paul C. Schuytema 

Which hard disk data 

compression products are 

best, and which one is best 

for you? 

74 

PRODUCTIVITY CHOKE 

By Tom Benford 

Crosstalk for Windows 2.0 

from DCA. 

COLUMNS 

4 
EDITORIAL LKENSE 

By Clifton Karnes 
A new model of computing. 

42 

NEWS l NOTES 

By Jill Champion 
Top computer news. 

46 

FEEDIACK 

Answers to tough questions. 

51 

WINDOWS WORKSHOP 

By Clifton Karnes 

Make Windows Help work for 

you. 

52 

INTRODOS 

By Tony Roberts 
DOS 6's enhanced 
Undelete command. 

54 

PROGRAMMING POWER 

By Tom Campbell 
BASIC compiler surprises. 




Cover photo by Mark Wagoner. 
Monitor from NEC displaying Franklin Quest's Ascend. 



58 

TIPS I. TOOLS 

Edited by 
Richard 0. Leinecker 
Tips from our readers. 

64 

HARDWARE CLINIC 

By Mark Minasi 

The final part of our series on 

how to use DOS 6's 

MultiConfig. 

76 

PERSONAL PRODUCTIVITY 

By Daniel 8. Janal 

Running cut of space on 

your hard disk? Here are 

some strategies to help you 

beat the crunch. 



80 

ART WORKS 

By Robert Bixby 
Digging up, chiseling, and 

tiling backgrounds for 
graphics and presentations. 

86 

MULTIMEDIA PC 

By David English 

Two new audio technologies 

at COMDEX and an 

upcoming multimedia 

section in 

COMPUTE. 

128 

NEWS IITS 

By Jill Champion 
Top stories at press time. 



ENTERTAINMENT 

82 
DISCOVERY CHOKE 

By David Sears 

Quarky and Quaysoo's 

Turbo Science from Sierra. 

84 

GAME INSIDER 

By Shay Addams 
CES highlights for gamers. 

88 

ENTERTAINMENT CHOICE 

By Scott A. May 

Buzz Aldrin's Race into 

Space from Interplay 

90 

GAMEPLAY 

By Paul C. Schuytema 

Burning rubber: Hot racecar 

simulations pour on the 

nitro. 

92 

GREAT GAME ADD-INS 

By Scott A. May 
Patches to upgrade your 
entertainment experience. 

REVIEWS 

97 

Omni Book 300, 

PageMaker 5.0, 

Lemmings 2: The Tribes, 

Stacker 3.1, 

KidCuts, 

ScanPlus Color 6000, 

Strike Commander, 

Gateway 2000 Handbook. 

The Norton Speedcache+. 

Millie's Math House, 

Three Screen Savers, 

Spectre, 

Jobhunt. 

L.A. Law, 

Lap Top Secretary, 

FailSafe Computer 

Guardian, 

Epson LQ-570+. 

and El-Fish. 

ADVERTISERS INDEX 

See page 113. 



COMPUTE (ISSN 0ia4-3S7X) is published mmthly in ihe United States and Canada by COMPUTE Publicairons Intefnaitonal Ltd.. 1965 Broadway. New Yorl<. NY 10023-5965 Volume 15 
Number 10, Issue 157 Copyright © 1993 by COMPUTE Pubiicaiions Inlernaiional Lid. All righls reserved COMPUTE is a tegisleied trademark o( COMPUTE Publications Irternalional Lidi 
Dislribuled worldwide (except Australia and the UKl by Curtis Circulation Company, PO, Box 9102. Pennsauken. NJ 0B109 Distributed in Australia by The Horwitz Group, PO. Box 306. 
Cammsray NSW 2062 Australia and in iha UK by Northern and Shell Pic , PC. Sox 3B1 . Millharbour. London E14 9TW Second.class postage paid at New York, NY, and at additional mailing 
offices. POSTMASTER: S«id XWrws changes lo COMPUTE Magazlna, PO Box 3245, Harlan, lA 51537 3041 Tel (81X1) 727.6937. Entire contents copyrighted All righls resen/ed 
Noihing may be reproduced in whole or in part without written permission Irom the publisher. Subscriptions: US. AFO . $19.94 one year: Canada and elsewhere .$25.94 one year. Single 
copies $2.95 in US. The publisher disclaims all responsibility to return unsolicited matter, and all righls in portions published thereof remain the sole property of COMPUTE Publications 
international Ltd. Letters sent to COMPUTE or its editors become the property of the magazine. Editorial offices are located at 324 W, Wendover Ave Ste 200 Greensboro NC 27408 
Tel (919) 275-9809 



PrinteiJ in the USA by R. R. Donnelley & Sons Inc. 
2 COMPUTE IXTOBER 1993 



#R 1266074 15 



Not just a new Sound Blaster. 
A new 16-bit audio standard 




Hands-free 



Introducing the Sound Blaster" 16 
Digital Audio Platform. A new concept 
in sound cards. And a new standard 
for 16-bit PC audio, 

YOU Won't Believe Your ears. 

PC audio never sounded so good- 
genuine CD-quality audio with fully 
12% more dynamic 
response and 15% 
better signal-to- 
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any competing 16-bit sound board. Plus 
software data compression that delivers 
16-bit fidelit)' while maximizing disk storage capacity. 
But there's more. Included in the Soimd Blaster 16 
package is the biggest advancement in PC control since 
the invention of the mouse: our exclusi\'e VoiceAssist ' 
software. It's a sophisticated speech recognition interface 
that uses a 32,000-command library to confrol Windows 
applications hands-free! 

The Only Sound Card That Grows With You. 

Unlike other 16-bit cards, Sound Blaster 16 comes with 
built-in interfaces for CD-ROM, MPU-401 MIDI and 

joystick control. And the unique 
modular, scalable architecUire 
lets you add more advanced 
features and technolo- ^_^ 
gies as you need theui. ^SSm 
Like our Advanced Hm 
Signal Processing 
chip that delivers 4:1 
real-time hardware 
data compression 
while reducing CPU time up to 
65%. Or professional-qualih' 
sampled ivave synthesis with our 




StatM)f-the-Art PC Sound mtli 
1 &-bit Codct: digital audio chip. 

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Vfgfaiabk, Modular Platfomi 
mute it easy to add new tecli- 
nologies like Advanced Sigmi 
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plus cross filatfiirm support for 
Windows 3.1. DOS or OS/l 



t psnule to 
Aflrnnccd Sig- 
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The ucio ] 6-bit PC audio standard: Incliidif programnmble mixer, microplwiK, 
VoiceAssist speech recognition softtvare, plus more tlinn 51000 in sciftuwe applications. 



plug-in Wave Blaster" daughter board. 

And— unlike other cards-the 
Sound Blaster 16 is 100% compatible with 
every game and application ever written 
for the Sound Blaster. . .which is to s^' 
virhially every game and application available for sound. 




( f)'jni(!i{}<: ts ax 
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NOBODY PACKS IN MORE VALUE THAN 
THE INDUSTRY LEADER. 



And as if that weren't enough, we've completed the package 
with more than $1000 wor\h of leading software- not too 
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So let's face it. When it comes to audio quality, fea- 
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For more information about Creative Labs products 
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call 1-800-998-5227. 



soundi CRE /vTIVE 



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iiiajj S Copyright 1 W3 Creative TechnoloQ' Ltd. Sound Blaster, VoiceAssist, Wave Blaster and the Sound Blaster and Cieative Labs logos are trademarks of CieaKi-e Technology Ltd. 

wriisii. All other trademarks are ovvned by their respech\'C companies. Creative Labs 1-40S428-66(K) 

cSSSS- Intemirional inquiries; Creative Technolog)- Ltd, Singapore. TEL 65-7734)233 FAX 65-773-0353. 

Circle Reader Service Number 125 



ffilTORIAL LICENSE 



Clifton Karnes 



There are radical 

changes ahead 

in the way we use 

computers 



Ioday, we're seeing the 
birth of a radical new mod- 
el of computing, one that 
wili dramatically change 
the way computers work and 
the way we use them. I call 
this new model of computing 
content-centered computing, 
and its emergence marks the 
beginning of the second com- 
puter revolution. 

Before discussing the new 
model, however, I want to talk 
about the current one, which 
we might call process-cen- 
tered computing. The comput- 
er was invented more than 50 
years ago to process informa- 
tion, and its ability to do this 
has accounted for its amazing 
success. In the process-cen- 
tered computing model, raw da- 
ta goes into the computer, the 
machine processes it, and use- 
ful information comes out. Ex- 
amples of process-centered 
computing include spread- 
sheets, word processors, data- 
bases, and almost every type 
of productivity application. 

in the content-centered 
model, instead of raw data go- 
ing into the computer, informa- 
tion goes in, and the comput- 
er's power is used to deliver 
this information in a form 
that's more useful, engaging, 




and entertaining, Examples of 
content-centered computing in- 
clude multimedia and online 
services. 

If you think about what hap- 
pens when you use a multime- 
dia encyclopedia, you'll see 
that something is going on 
that's fundamentally different 
from massaging data with a 
spreadsheet. With a multime- 
dia title, the computer isn't 
crunching numbers or text; 
it's delivering text, sound, and 
often, video. The same thing 
is true with online networking. 
When you dial up an online 
service, your computer enters 
another state. It's not working 
to process data into informa- 
tion; it's working to deliver in- 
formation — content. 

It's interesting that al- 
though networking is a much 
older technology than multime- 
dia, multimedia is much more 
advanced. The reason for 
this is that multimedia's medi- 
um — CD-ROM — is a much 
more powerful, higher-band- 
width conductor for content 
than networking's medium — 
the telephone line. 

This is changing rapidly, how- 
ever In the next two years, the 
speed of telephone transmis- 
sion may increase 100 times 
or more, and we'll be able to 
do things via computers net- 
worked with phone lines that 
are only possible now with CD- 
ROM-lDased multimedia. 

This birth of content-cen- 
tered computing can be 
viewed as both good and bad. 
Historically, other technologies 
that have made a transition 
from process to content have 
moved from small niche mar- 
kets to large, broad-based con- 
sumer markets. Hardware com- 
panies that survive these tran- 
sitions do very well. Many mag- 
azines do poorly, though, be- 
cause enthusiasts tend to be 
more interested in process rath- 
er than content. 

As background, some ex- 
amples of pure content-cen- 



tered consumer technologies 
include the telephone, televi- 
sion, and VCR. These are the 
consumer technologies with 
the broadest consumer base. 
For examples of technologies 
that began as process-cen- 
tered but made a transition to 
content-centered, you have 
stereo, photography, and vid- 
eo. These all began as tech- 
nologies that needed lots of us- 
er interaction for success. 

What does this emergence 
of content-centered comput- 
ing mean for COMPUTE? Will 
COMPUTE go the way of 
most of the stereo and photog- 
raphy magazines of the 
1980s? We don't think so, be- 
cause computers are different 
from stereos and cameras in 
three ways: Computers are 
general-purpose devices (ste- 
reos and cameras are dedicat- 
ed devices), computers are 
deeply programmable devic- 
es (stereos and cameras are 
very thinly programmable de- 
vices), and computers are 
much more complicated. 

In fact, this emergence of 
content-centered computing 
is actually good news for COM- 
PUTE for three reasons. It 
gives us two exciting technol- 
ogies to cover (multimedia 
and networking), the interest 
in the new technologies is 
coming from the home market 
(which is COMPUTE'S home 
territory), and these new tech- 
nologies give us two new me- 
dia to use as delivery systems 
for COMPUTE information. 

It's this last point I want to 
emphasize, because COM- 
PUTE is going back online. Be- 
ginning in September, you'll 
be able to find COMPUTE on 
America Online by searching 
for the keyword COMPUTE or 
exploring the Omni forum, of 
which we're a part. Check us 
out. We'll be covering the 
same process-centered top- 
ics we've always covered 
plus all the hot, new content- 
centered ones. 3 



COMPUTE OCTOBER 1993 




Mission 



IBM Programming Systems introduces 
C Sel++,'" tlie most complete a|)plioalion 
development package you can buy for 
■ OS/2® Its 32-bit C/C-t-+ 
compiler lets you unleash 
all the power of OS/2 — so you can 
create the most advanced, high- 
performance applications. 

It has an extraordinary code optimizer with a 
fuU set of options. Even a switch to optimize for the new 
Pentium™ processor. Plus a full set of class libraries, 
including application frameworks for PM, container 
classes and classes for multitasking, streams and more 

There's also a full complement of other helpfu 
features. Such as an interactive source level debugger. 

And the unique Execution Trace 
Analyzer traces the 

execution of a program, 
then graphically displays 
^^^ __*«,^— ■ diagiamsof the 

^^^ ^^^^b^H ^b ^b analysis. Plus a class 
^"^ ^™* *^ ** ^ ' librar)' browser that 
shows class library relationships. 

What's more, you get Worldrame/2,™ a language- 
independent tool that lets you customize your own etvA- 
ronment. It's adaptable and flexible — you can use any 16 
and 32-bit DOS, Windows™ and OS/2 took 





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C Set -•-+ Technical Features 



ANS! C X3.159-1989 



NIST validated 



ANSI C++ X3J16 (Full ARM) 



50 9899:1990 



Global 



Inter-module 



Function inllning 



Instruction scheduling 



To order C Set-f-+ , 
contact your nearest dealer or call 
1-800-342-6672 (USA) or 
1-800-465-7999 ext. 460 (Canada). 

Clearly, there's only one place to start. C Set4-I- . 



starts 
here 



tBM and OS/2 are registerKi trademarks and C Set ++ and Worktiama^ are trademarte ol International Business Machines Corporation. Pentium is a traderttafk ot InieJ Corporation, 
Windows is a Irademarl^ of Hflicrosoft Corp, £ 1993iBMCofp. 

Circle Reader Service Number 207 



» CITIZEN 




Here's some real ly big news for the 
little guy. Introducing the world's first EASY 
laser printer. The Citizen ProLaser 6000" 

The Citizen ProLaser 6000 is the only 
laser printer you can get witii the features you 
want, and the "easy" you need. Just like the 
big-guys, we have a list of impressive features 
(you techies can check it out below). But 
what's really important is that it's easy to buy 
because everything's included. It's easy to 
use because you just plug it in and it works. 
And it's easy to look your best with lots of 
on-board fonts and print quality that'll make 
you OOH and AAH. 

So why do we put so much in a laser 
piintcr that costs so little? Hey, we're Citizen. 
We've been making dot-matrix printers that 
way for j'ears. And besides, someone's got to 
look out for the little guv. 



.xi td I i aaffliMiiiiUaa 



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nrly iif llicir ris]ifilii 



i)f (jlizt'U A 



IntroduciM 

TheWjrld'sRrsP 
Eas\^ Laser PrintBB. 







Thfi Citizen ProL.aser 
)h feLilure8 iriflutU* <i 
siiif^U' (.'orn[)tMi('nt iriui^ing 
rartrid|;f'. 1 11^ LuscrJrt III 
(PCL-5) ('ompali]>iIity. a 
relialilfr internal pap<rr 
lra\, 34 inlernaJ fonts, 
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PraLaser 6000 

Easy lb Buy, Easy lb Use,Easy To Look ¥)ur Best. 





ECORDER 
MACROS 




Illustration by Theo Rudnok 



upercnarge your aesKTop 

^ with this collection 

■ 

of essential Recorder macros 



'indows' Recorder has received 
a lot of criticism for being an 
underpowered app, and some 
of this criticism is justified. The biggest 
drawbacks to Recorder are that you 
can't edit the macros you create and 
that there are no provisions for dialog 
boxes and advanced functions. 

Recorder is a simple keystroke 
recorder (hence the name) that can play 
back your keystrokes. Once you under- 
stand Recorder's power and its limita- 
tions and start using it, it quickly 
becomes an indispensable application, 

f?ecorder Basics 

Recorder looks like most other Windows 

applications. It has a menu bar with 
options that look familiar. The File menu 
has selections for New, Open, Save, 
Save As, Merge, and Exit. With the 
exception of Merge, these are options 
we'd see on any File menu. 

Probably the best way to get started 
with Recorder is to record a sample 
macro. For the first macro, let's choose a 
global macro that will save the current 
document. (We'll use the term global to 
describe the macros that can be played 
back to any application.) Here's some 
background. 

As you know, much of Windows' inter- 
face is standard across applications. 
Most windows have a title bar, menu bar, 
and scroll bars (if they're needed), and 
the windows themselves can be moved 



and resized, You'l! aiso note that almost 
every menu bar includes entries for File 
and Help. Digging deeper, if you exam- 
ine almost any File menu, you'll see 
entries for New, Open, Save, Print, and 
Exit. This structure is all part of Win- 
dows' standard interface, and it's one of 
the reasons that Windows is so easy to 
use — the parts of different applications 
that work the same way have the same 
menu choices. 

If you look at the keyboard shortcuts 
in several different File menus, however, 
you'll see a variety of key combinations. 
The Save command, for example, may 
be Shift-F12 in one application, F2 in 
another, Ctri-S in a third, and many pro- 
grams will have no shortcut key at all. 
Unlike menu options, shortcut keys are 
not standard. 

You can change all that, however, with 
Windows' Recorder. 

Let's say that you want Ctrl-S to save 
the current file in all your Windows appli- 
cations, I use Ctrl-S because it's easy to 
remember and Microsoft is recommend- 
ing that developers use this as the short- 
cut key to save the active file. 

1 . Run Recorder. 

2. Run any application (like Write) that 
can save files. 

3. Select Macro, Record and under 
Macro Name, type Save file. 

4. Under Shortcut Key, put Ctrl-S (type s 
in the text box at the top of the Shortcut 



Article by Clifton Karnes 



Key area in the Record Macro 
box, and make sure only the 
check box next to Ctrl is 
checked). 

5. Under Record Mouse, se- 
lect Ignore Mouse. 

6. Under Playback To, choose 
Any Application. 

7. Click on Start, and Recorder 
will minimize itself and start 
flashing to remind you that it's 
recording. 

8. In your application, press 
Alt-F, S to save the current file. 
(Alt-F activates the File menu, 
and S selects the Save com- 
mand). 

9. Stop recording by pressing 
Ctrl-Break, choose Save Mac- 
ro, and click on OK. 



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Almost every Windows program with a menu bar has a File 
menu with entries for New, Open, Save, Print, and Exit. 



Rocard Mqcto f^ni 



Now your macro has been 
recorded. Even though this 
Recorder file has just one 
macro in it, you'll want to save 
it, so pull down the File menu, 
select Save, and in the Save 
dialog box type mymacros 
under File Name. (Recorder 
will supply the REC extension.) 

Now Ctrl-S will save the cur- 
rent file in any Windows pro- 
gram that follows the minimum 
Windows standards. To play 
back this macro, you simply press the 
shortcut key you assigned in the 
Properties dialog box. Alternately, you 
can double-click on the macro name 
in the Recorder window, but this is an 
option you will probably never use, 

You may wonder what happens 
when you press Ctrl-S in an applica- 
tion that already has a Ctrl-S shortcut 
key defined. Is the macro played 
back, or does the application's key 
take precedence? When it comes to 
shortcut keys. Recorder is king, and 
its shortcut keys take precedence 
over an application's. 

Since the applications with the 
built-in Ctrl-S keystroke almost cer- 
tainly follow the Windows conventions 
that our Recorder macro is assuming, 
our Recorder Ctrl-S will work just as 
well in them as their native Ctrl-S. 

In this one simple example we 
have demonstrated that 

• It's best to ignore mouse move- 
ments, because using them depends 
on your recording and playback 
screen layouts being identical. Any 
change in the layout of your screen 
can result in unexpected problems. 

• Recorder macros can be played 
back either to the same application 
that you recorded them with (local 
macros or application-specific macros) 
or to any application {global macros). 
10 COMPUTE OCTOBER 1993 




■£lByhiick- 



AnyApplIcfldioe 



QCon1tn«OtH loop 
^Enafate ShoHcul Kays 



1 



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To view the properties for any Recorder macro, all you have 
to do is select Options, Properties. 

Lotal Macros 

Let's take a look at some of the alter- 
natives available to you. Pull down the 
Options menu and select Preferences. 
Under Playback To, select Same 
Application (we'll change this for our 
global macros, like the one we just 
created, but it's safer to have this as 
the default). 

Under Playback Speed, select 
Fast. With this selection, no matter 
how slowly you record your key- 
strokes, the playback will be as fast 
as possible. 

Under Record Mouse, choose 
Ignore Mouse, for the reason stated 
above. The last option, Relative To, is 
only relevant if we're recording mouse 
movements, so you can leave it as it is. 

Also, under the Options menu, 
make sure Control+Break Checking, 
Shortcut Keys, and Minimize On Use 
are all checked. 

Control + Break Checking allows 
you to stop recording by pressing 
Ctrl-Break. Shortcut Keys lets you nest 
macros inside macros. Minimize On 
Use causes the Recorder to be mini- 
mized so it's out of the way when you 
start recording. 

Macro Number 2 

Let's walk through another macro- 
recording session, but before we do, 
let's go back to the first macro. Select 



it and choose Options, Prop- 
erties. You'll notice from this 
dialog box that you have the 
convenient option of changing 
the name, shortcut key, and 
other properties of your macro 
at any time. 

One convention i follow with 
macros is to put In parentheses 
at the end of the macro name 
an abbreviation for the applica- 
tion to which the macro plays 
back. If it's a global macro, I 
use (G); if the macro plays 
back to File Manager only, I use 
(FM); and so on. 

For the Ctrl-S macro, the new 
name should read Save file (G). 
This little bit of housekeeping 
will come in handy later, so 1 
urge you to do it. 

Our previous macro was 
designed to save the active file. 
But almost as often, you'll be 
opening files. Many applica- 
tions (but not all applications) 
use Ctrl-O to call up the Open 
dialog box, which is easy to 
remember, And just as Micro- 
soft is now recommending that 
developers use Ctrl-S for saving 
a file, it's recommending they 
use Ctrl-O for opening a file. 
Here's a step-by-step guide for 
creating an Open macro. The name 
for this macro is Open file (G), and its 
shortcut key is Ctrl-O. 

1 . Load any application that can open 
files. 

2. Begin recording (choose Macro, 
Record and type in the macro's name 
and its shortcut key). 

3. Press Alt-F, 0. 

4. Stop recording (press Ctrl-Break, 
choose Save Macro, and click on 
OK), 

5. Save your macro file. 

Now Ctrl-O will call up the Open 
dialog box in any Windows applica- 
tion that opens files. If that application 
uses Ctrl-O already, this macro will 
still work, as long as the application 
has a File menu with an Open entry. 

One thing you'll often find yourself 
doing is saving the current tile and 
exiting the application. If you Ye using 
Ctrl-S to save a file, it makes sense to 
use that keypress but to add another 
key to intensify it. The key combina- 
tion I like is Ctrl-Shift-S for save and 
exit. The macro name is Save file and 
quit(G). 

1 . Load any application that can save 
files. 

2. Begin recording (choose Macro, 
Record and type in the macro's name 



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and its shortcut key). 

3. Press Alt-F, S, Alt-F, X, 

4. Stop recording {press Ctrl-Break, 
choose Save Macro, and click on 
OK). 

5. Save your macro file. 

Now test the macro. Load a file into 
any application that saves files, and 
press Ctrl-Shift-S. You'll save the cur- 
rent file and exit the application. 

More Global Matros 

One of the differences between 
Windows 3.0 and Windows 3.1 is the 
change in the edit keys used for copy- 
ing, cutting, and pasting. 



Cut 

Copy 

Paste 



Windows 3.0 

Shift-Del 

Ctrl-Ins 

Shift-Ins 



Windows 3.1 

Ctrl-X 
Ctrl-C 
Ctrl-V 



The new keys are like the Mac's, and 
they do have the benefit of not 
requiring you to move your 
hands away from the home 
keys. 

The problem is that not all 
applications use these keys. 

What's going to help us with 
a solution is that Microsoft has 
recommended that even those 
products that support the new 
keys keep the old ones for 
compatibility (for users who 
don't want to change). 

What this means is that all 
Windows applications should 
support Shift-Del, Ctrl-Ins, and 
Shift-Ins, but only some appli- 
cations will support Ctrl-X, Ctrl- 
C, and Ct,rl-V. 

We can even things out so 
all applications support the new key- 
strokes by creating three Recorder 
macros. What these macros will do is 
map the keystrokes Shift-Del, Ctrl-Ins, 
and Shift-Ins to the shortcut keys Ctrl- 
X, Ctrl-C, and Ctrl-V, With these 
macros in place, our new edit keys 
will work in all Windows applications. 
Here are the three macros. 

Macro Name: Cut (G) 
Shortcut Key: Ctrl-X 
Playback To: Any Application 

1. l_oad any application that lets you 
edit text (such as Write) and select 
some text. 

2. Begin recording. 

3. Press Shift-Del. 

4. Stop recording. 

5. Save your macro file. 

Macro Name: Copy (G) 

Shortcut Key: Ctrl-C 

Playback To: Any Application 

1, Load any application that lets you 

12 COMPUTE OCTOBER 1993 



edit text (such as Write) and select 
some text. 

2. Begin recording. 

3. Press Ctrl-Ins. 

4. Stop recording. 

5. Save your macro file, 

(VJacro Name: Paste (G) 
Shortcut Key: Ctrl-V 
Playback To: Any Application 

1, Load any application that lets you 
edit text (such as Write), select some 
text, and cut or copy it to the 
Clipboard. 

2. Begin recording. 
3- Press Shift-Ins, 

4. Stop recording. 

5. Save your macro file. 

With these three macros ready to 
go, Ctrl-C, Ctrl-X, and Ctrl-V should 
copy, cut, and paste in virtually any 
Windows program that supports cut- 
ting and pasting with the Clipboard, 




All Windows MDI applications have a Window menu 
entry with the open document windows numbered. 



Switching Windows 

One of the best things about Win- 
dows — and what lets us create these 
global macros — is that much of the 
interface is standardized. MDI 
(Multiple Document Interface) appli- 
cations are one of Windows' neat 
standard features. These programs, 
such as Program Manager, File 
Manager, SysEdit, and many others, 
let you work with several document 
windows at once inside an application 
that acts as a minidesktop. 

Switching between these internal 
document windows, however, is 
something of a pain. You can always 
go to the Window menu and select the 
window you want, but that's slow and 
tedious. There are two key combina- 
tions that let you cycle through open 
documents {Ctrl-F6 and the undocu- 
mented Ctrl-Tab), but these key- 
strokes cycle through all open docu- 
ments rather than moving you to the 
one you want. We can solve this prob- 



lem, however, and Windows' MDI 
standards will help us. 

If you look at the Window menu in 
any MDI application, such as File 
Manager, you'll see that each window 
is numbered. So Alt-W (to activate the 
Window menu) followed by a number 
will move you to the window associat- 
ed with that number. 

All we need to do is create a group 
of macros that make switching win- 
dows simpler. 

Since some applications support 
these window-navigation shortcuts 
and use the key combination Alt-1, 
Alt-2, and so on, we'll use those short- 
cut I<eys. Here's the first macro. 

Macro Name: Switch to window #1 (G) 
Shortcut Key: Alt-1 
Playback To: Any Application 

1, Load any application that supports 
multiple documents. 

2. Begin recording. 

3. Press Alt-W, 1 . 

4. Stop recording. 

5. Save your macro file. 



Now, when you press Att-1, 
you'll move to window #1 . 

You'll want to record eight 
more macros to switch to win- 
dows 2-9. Simply follow the 
keystrokes above, replacing 
the number 1 in Macro Name, 
Shortcut Key, and step number 
3 with the new number. 

This group of macros makes 
using a program like SysEdit 
much easier. In that applica- 
tion, the windows are always in 
the same order, and they 
always have the same num- 
bers in the Window menu. 



Window #1 
Window #2 
Window #3 
Window #4 



WIN. INI 
SYSTEM.INI 
CONFIG.SYS 
AUTOEXEC.BAT 



Say you want to edit SYSTEM.INI. 
As soon as the program loads, press 
Alt-2, and you're up and running. 
Switching to AUTOEXEC.BAT is sim- 
ply a matter of pressing Alt-4. These 
shortcut keys will save you lots of time 
and help keep your work organized. 

Minimize and Maximize 

We usually use the mouse to adjust 
our windows' sizes, but a keyboard 
macro can come in handy. Here are 
three global macros to minimize, max- 
imize, and restore windows. 

Macro Name: Minimize window (G) 
Shortcut Key: Ctrl-Alt-down arrow 
1. Load any application that you can 
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2. Begin recording, 

3. Press Ait-space bar. 

4. Press N. 

5. Stop recording. 

6. Save your macro (iie. 



Macro Events 



ctrt«S 



Ivlacro Name: Maximize win- 
dow (G) 
Shortcut Key: Ctrl-Alt-up arrow 

1. Load any application ttiat 
you can maximize. 

2. Begin recording. 

3. Press Alt-space bar. 

4. Press X. 

5. Stop recording. 

6. Save your macro file. 

Macro Name: Restore window 

{G) 

Shortcut Key: Ctrl-Alt-right arrow 

1. Load any application that you can 
restore. 

2. Begin recording, 

3. Press Alt-space bar, 

4. Press R. 

5. Stop recording. 

6. Save your macro file. 

Two Additional Macros 

Here are two final macros. Whether 
you decide to use them or not, you 
should at least give them a try. 

Macro Name: Exit (G) 



ODD I Syskey Down, AH. WRrTEIMSWRrTE.MENU. msBC 

00D2 Syskoy Dawn. (, WRITEtMSWBITE^MENU, 550 msac 

0003 Syskoy Up. I. V/BtTEIMSWRirE_MENU. 110 msac 

0004 Kay Up. AIL WRITEIMSWRITE_MENU. 1045 msec 

0005 Key Onwn, s. WRITEfkSWRITE.MENU. 930 msec 
OODG Ksy Up. s. WRlTEIMSWRiTE MENU. ItO msec 



To see the keystrokes used in a Recorder macro, 
hold down the Shift l<ey and choose Macro. 
Properties (ram Recorder's menu bar. 



Shortcut Key: Alt-X 

1. Load any application that can exit 

2. Begin recording, 

3. Press Alt-F4. 

4. Stop recording. 

5. Save your macro file, 

Macro Name: Save As (G) 
Shortcut Key: Ctrl-A 

1. Load any application that has a 
Save As menu option under File. 

2. Begin recording. 

3. Press Alt-F, A. 

4. Stop recording. 

5. Save your macro file. 




:^^Qf(^/fDpZ^ 



I find the Exit macro much 
easier to execute than pressing 
Alt-F4, but that's part of the 
problem with it. Many people 
may find it too easy to press: 
You might press the key combi- 
nation by accident. Alt-F4 isn't 
easy to remember, but it's hard 
to hit accidentally. 

The Save As macro is useful, 
but what if you hit it by accident 
in an application that has no 
Save As menu option? In that 
case, Recorder thinks for a very 
long time and displays a dialog 
box that essentially says some- 
thing's wrong. This will occur 
whenever a Recorder macro 
can't find the command it's looking for. 

Managing Macros 

Recorder doesn't have lots of bells 
and whistles, but it does have a cou- 
ple of neat features — and one of the 
most useful of these features is 
undocumented. 

First, there's no way to change the 
order of your macros in Recorder's 
macro window. After a few months of 
recording, you'll have a mess. I've 
found that dividing macros into three 
groups and keeping these groups 
separate can make working with Re- 
corder much easier. These are the 
groups I use. 

• Global macros 

• File Manager macros 

• Miscellaneous macros 

I keep each group in a separate file. 
You'll want to have all of your macros 
available on your desktop at the same 
time, however. You don't want to have 
to load in a new file when you need a 
global or miscellaneous macro. Adding 
the extra step of loading a macro file 
defeats the purpose of macros: to 
make complex processes occur with 
the press of a couple of keys. The solu- 
tion Is to maintain separate files, but to 
create a master macro file from these, 
using Recorder's Merge command. 
Here's how it works. 

1. Load Recorder and choose File, 
New. 

2. Let's say your macro files have the 
names GLOBAL.REC, WINFILE.REC, 
and MISG.REC. You choose File, 
Merge and select GLOBAL.REC. 

3. Choose File, Merge again and 
select WINFILE.REC. 

4. Choose File, Merge a third time and 
choose MISC.REC. Now you should 
save this macro file using the filename 
MYMACROS.REC- 

Now you have a master macro file 



14 COMPUTE OCTOBER 1993 



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with the macros organized by type. To l<eep this file orga- 
nized this way, before you record a new macro, load the 
file it should go into. When you've finished debugging the 
macro and you're satisfied with it, create a new master. 

Peeking at Macros 

One problem you'll run into when managing your macros is not 
knowing for sure what the macro does or which keystrokes it 
uses. There's room for a description in the Macro, Properties 
dialog box, so you can leave yourself a note about the macro's 
purpose, but you often need to know the keystrokes the macro 
uses, and that would be a tedious thing to enter into the 
description. 

Help arrives in the form of another undocumented fea- 
ture. Choose Macro, Properties with the mouse, but hold 
down the Shift key. You'll see a display of the macro's key- 
strokes. 

This display is a little hard to read when you first tackle 
it, however, because each keypress is represented by two 
entries in the list: one for when the key was pressed and 
one for when it was released. 

Here's a rundown on each entry in the display: the 
number of the keypress, the key state, the key, the class 
name of the program played to, and the time between the 
keystrokes. 

Recorded History 

Recorder is a powerful tool. Although each macro may save 
you only three or four keystrokes, sometimes this savings 
may mean the difference between a boring grind and a sim- 
ple pleasure. Anytime you find yourself about to enter a 
series of keystrokes for a second time, simpiy start up 
Recorder first. Give the action a shortcut key, and automate 
your Windows work. 

Next month, you'll find a feature with more ideas for 
using Recorder as well as other advanced (but under- 
used) features of Windows. 

This feature is an excerpt from Clifton Karnes's Essential 
Windows Tools, a book-and-disk combination from COM- 
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hints, tips, and secrets with a disk of high-quality software 
tools. 

You can order Essential Windows Tools by sending 
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Books, c/o CCC, 2500 l^cClellan Avenue, Pennsauken, 
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TEST LAB 



Edited by Mike Hudnall 
Reviews by Richard 0. Mann 

Anyone using a PC daily for 
any length of time soon 
begins to fantasize about 
i using it to control the de- 
tails that make up daily life. 
Years ago, when I got a terminal 
at my desk attached to the com- 
pany's quarter-million-dollar min- 
icomputer, the first thing I did was 
write a FORTRAN application to 
control my to-do list. 

Today's personal information 
managers (PIMs) routinely handle 
to-do lists, schedules, address 
books, and phone dialing. To 
these core functions, the pro- 
grams add a dazzling variety of 
other bells and whistles, tools 
and utilities. You'll find calcula- 
tors, inspirational quotes, project 
managers, Gantt charts, check- 
book processors, prayer rolls, 
phone logs, contact histories, dai- 
ly scripture readings, alarms, per- 
sonal journals, customizable 
databases, daily cartoons, sales 
follow-up information, and doz- 
ens of other clever and useful 
ways to manage your life. 

No other type of software 
offers so much variety. Because 
personal information is ultimately 
individual (even intimate), you 
probably won't find a program 
that precisely matches your work 
style, your personality, and your 
particular information needs. The 
trick in choosing a PIM is to find 




IB COMPUTE OCTOBER 1993 



the one that most closely approx- 
imates the way that you think and 
the way that you work. 

To help you find that program, 
Test Lab looks at ten outstanding 
Windows PIMs this month. While 
PIMs were interesting under 
DOS, they didn't achieve major 
success until the age of Microsoft 
Windows. The ability to keep 
your PIM running on the desktop 
at all times and to whiz back and 
forth among calendars, task lists, 
note windows, and other PIM mod- 
ules makes Windows the ideal 
PIM environment, 

Windows PIMs make up a 
dynamic field; COMPUTE'S edi- 
tors and I decided to hold up 
these reviews to await the release 
of major upgrades of PackRat 
and Commence, as well as the sig- 
nificant new Sharkware — all in the 
same week, well after our initial 
deadlines. Unfortunately, we 
weren't able to get our hands on 
another highly touted new PIM, 
ECCO Professional, in time for a 
full review in this Test Lab, even 
though it will be shipping by the 
time you read this. However, a 
sidebar does cover this product. 

It was a true delight to work 
with these programs; they offer a 
diversity of unique tools for spe- 
cial purposes while still covering 
the core functions admirably. 
With so many facets to these pro- 
grams, I wasn't able to tell you eve- 
rything about each program in 
the space available. To give you 
the most useful information pos- 
sible, I've listed the most 
important items in the features 
grid, which wiil answer many of 
your questions. 

In the reviews of these person- 
al information managers, I've char- 



ACT! for Windows 1.1— $395 
istACTt for Windows— S149 

SYIVIANTEC 
10201 Torre Ave. 
Cupertino, CA 95014-2132 
(800) 4A1-7234 
(408) 253-9600 



acterized each program, mention- 
ing the depth of the program, 
special features, the work style it 
supports, and its central focus. 
You can assume that unless other- 
wise specified, the programs cov- 
er the basic core features. 

These programs exemplify the 
power of the metaphor in Win- 
dows software. Each of them has 
chosen a basic approach to the 
job that mimics a familiar desktop 
tool. YourWay is a card file- 
Ascend is an electronic Franklin 
Day Planner. Lotus Organizer, 
using perhaps the most visually 
appealing metaphor, looks like a 
pocket-size nngbound notebook. 
Info Select, believe it or not, is a 
mass of virtual Post-it Notes. 
Many of the programs imitate a 
desktop calendar. One of these 
metaphors is likely to strike you 
as just right. 

You may wonder which person- 
al information manager is the 
best. That I can't tell you. I know 
the characteristics of the pro- 
grams, but which one is the best 
for you depends totally on your 
personality. Other writers and 
editors have recommended their 
choices over the last year. These 
include Lotus Organizer, Info Se- 
lect, PackRat, DeskTop Set, 
Ascend, Commence, YourWay, 
ACT!, and In His Time. Had it 
been available for review, I'm 
sure Sharkware would've been 
chosen as well. Obviously, there 
is no consensus. 

One important area I haven't 
addressed is networking capacity. 
Many of these programs have net- 
work versions that add amazing lev- 
els of work group effectiveness. 
Only a few of COMPUTE'S home 
and small-business readers, how- 
ever, use networks — so far. 

If you're ready to tackle that 
unorganized, frustrating mass of 
unrelated yet desperately impor- 
tant details we call personal infor- 
mation, one of these programs is 
likely to be a good match for your 
needs. Test Lab has the informa- 
tion to help you find it. 

RICHARD 0. MANN 



ACT! FOR WINDOWS 
1.1 

ACT! for Windows 1 .1 is nominal- 
ly a contact manager, not a PIM. 
It has, however, all the necessary 
features to function as a PIM, 
even though its core, its reason 
for being, is contact manage- 
ment. We review it here because 
it's a perfectly good PIM that's an 
excellent choice for someone 
with heavier-than-normal contact 
management needs. 

ACT! , of course, is the longtime 
best-selling contact manager for 
DOS. The company applied its mar- 
keting mastery to the Windows ver- 
sion, taking several years to devel- 
op it. You may have heard that it 
was painfully slow and had many 
bugs when it was first released 
last year. Version 1.1 has correct- 
ed all that, resulting in a relatively 
bug-free program that runs at an 
acceptable speed. 

ACTI's basic contact record 
has more than 70 fields laid out 
in a logical two-screen spread. In 
addition to the normal informa- 
tion, it provides fields for results 
of the last sales call, the sched- 
uled date for the next call, and sim- 
ilar sales-related information. Any 
or all of the fields can be rede- 
fined, renamed, and moved. 
There's a wealth of flexible infor- 
mation storage capacity at your 
fingertips. 

Filling in fields Is almost fun. 
Common choices for many fields 
are available in pull-down list box- 
es, but ACT! also moves through 
the list to the closest match as 
you type in the field. Often two or 
three letters are all you need to 
fill in a field quickly. 

Appointment scheduling and 
to-do list processing are not as 
deep or flexible as in some of the 
other high-powered PI Ms, but 
they're good enough to handle 
most normal needs. 

As part of its contact manage- 
ment features, ACT! provides a 
useful set of letter templates and 
word-processing functions. 



though it also comes with auto- 
matic DDE links to the primary Win- 
dows word processors. 

A feature unique to this pro- 
gram is its link to the HP95LX 
palmtop computer. A special 
version of ACT! for the HP95 
comes with automatic links to the 
desktop versions of ACT! so you 
can quickly and easily exchange 
data between computers. If you 
use a laptop or notebook comput- 
er, ACT! can merge the data in 
both your laptop and desktop 
computers so that all data is in 
both databases. 

ACT! is really a whole family of 
products,- including IstACT! — a 
streamlined, limited-feature ver- 
sion that could be adequate for 
many users. There's a IstACT! ver- 
sion for DOS and another for Win- 
dows. The program limits you to 
one database, prints only five Pre- 
formatted reports, and cannot 
send faxes directly, but it retains 
the full set of 70 fully user-defina- 
ble fields. 

ACT! for Windows 1.1 is an 
excellent choice if you happen to 
be interested primarily in tracking 
discrete bits of information on 
many contacts and don't have an 
extremely complex schedule or 
to-do list. 

Circle Reader Service Number 371 



MAPLINX FOR WINDOWS 

A fascinating add-in for ACT! for 
Windows is f^apLinx for Windows, 
a database of maps with 23,000 
U.S. city names and all the ZIP 
codes. It reads your ACT! data- 
base and shows the locations of 
your contacts on a series of maps 
which can be printed or exported 
to other Windows programs. 

For more information about 
IvtapLinx for Windows ($399.95), 
write to MapLinx, 5068 West Pia- 
no Parkway, Piano, Texas 75093. 
Or call (800) 352-3414. 

—RICHARD 0. tuiANN 
Circle Reader Service Number 381 



ASCEND 4.0 



Ascend, like Sharkware, is de- 
signed around a specialized 
management philosophy. It's an 
electronic implementation of the 
Franklin Day Planner, the million- 
selling time management tool 
used by people trained in Frank- 
lin Quest seminars. If you're a 
Day Planner user, you'll love As- 
cend. If not, you'll want to buy the 
version that comes with a copy of 
the paper planner and the four- 
hour audiotape seminar that teach- 
es the system. 
The Franklin system starts with 



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OCTOBER 1993 COMPUTE 19 



TEST LAB 




your values and goals and shows 
you how to select daily activities 
leading to your longer-term goals. 
For those willing to undertake this 
thoughtful evaluation of their lives, 
this is powerful stuff indeed. 

While Ascend's screens don't 
try to look like the paper book (the 
way Organizer does), the 12 basic 
functions of Ascend mimic the 12 
primary parts of the Day Planner. 
The Prioritized Daily Task List is the 
base of daily operations; it's a to- 
do list with priorities in letter-num- 
ber pairs such as A1 and B4. 
(Hard-core time managers insist 
on precision in priority rankings.) 

The Appointments window han- 
dles daily scheduling nicely, 
including provisions for recurring 
events. You can drag and drop 
appointments and to-do items 
between lists and link them to a 
person's contact history. The dai- 
ly, weekly, and monthly views 
take every opportunity to present 
your committed time graphically 

Almost all basic records — 
appointments, to-do activities, 
and so forth — have unlimited free- 
form note fields built in. Most 
note fields provide basic word- 
processing features, such as 
fonts, justification, italic, and even 
date and time stamps. 

The Daily Record of Events is 
a journallike listing of whatever 
comes up during the day. You en- 
ter the data, recording details of 
commitments you make as well 
as information you receive. It's ad 
kept on that day's page and is 
available to you through Global 

20 COMPUTE OCTOBER 1993 



Ascend 4.0— $199.00 (soflware 

only), $299.00 (lull package, 

including Day Planner and taped 

seminar) 

Values Quest— S49J5 

FRANKLIN QUEST 

2550 S. Decker Lake Blvd. 

Salt Lake City, UT 84119 

(800)877-1814 

(801) 975-9992 



Search at any time. 

Other features include Turbo 
File (a minidatabase for organizing 
small bits of loose information), a 
phone log, the (vlaster Task List 
{for storing tasks without specific 
deadlines), a database of motiva- 
tional quotes, a separate personal 
journal, and the Red Tabs section, 
which mimics the Day Planner's 
numbered red tabs for keeping 
pages of related information on top- 
ics of your choice. 

Underlying it all is the values 
pyramid, a four-level compendi- 
um ol your basic values, long- 
term and intermediate goals, and 
daily tasks. Here you build down 
from what you'd like to accom- 
plish through the steps it'll take to 
get there. Include the daily steps 
in your to-do items, and you may 
achieve your goals more quickly 



than you thought possible. Val- 
ues Quest, an add-on program 
priced at around $50.00, pro- 
vides extra guidance in setting 
up your pyramid. 

Ascend prints pages in Franklin 
format for use in Franklin binders, 
another reminder that the program 
is aimed directly at Franklin users. 
But, like the Day Planner itself. 
Ascend can be useful to anyone; 
it's just at its finest when used with 
the full Franklin philosophy 

Circle Reader Service Number 372 

COIVIMENCE 2.0 

Commence 2.0 has a distin- 
guished history. The developer, 
Jensen-Jones, sold the market- 
ing rights to IBM, which sold the 
product as Current 1 .0. Current 
was OK, but it suffered from 
IBM's lack of savvy regarding the 
style of the PC software market. 
The manuals were stuffy and 
hard to use, and the program 
wasn't particularly friendly. 

When Jensen-Jones reac- 
quired the rights to Current, it 
reworked the program, named it 
Commence 1.0, outfitted it with 
decent manuals, and started to 
market it intelligently — with much 
more success than IBM. The new 
Commence 2.0 adds maturity 



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"antasy Empires 


S36 


Star Trek 25th Aniv 


336 


Guy Spy Terror Deep 


S36 


Star Trek: Next Gen 


346 


Hell Cab 


852 


Starship 


338 


ndy Jones Fate Altantis 352 


The Prophecy 


836 


ron Helix 


860 


Where in America CSD 


S37 


<ing's Quest 5 


S42 


Where in Europe CSD 


S29 


<infl's Quest 6 


S48 


Where in Space CSD 


350 


<ing's Ransom 


838 


Where in USA CSD DIx 


$45 


Laura Bow 2 


$42 


Where in Time CSD 


$32 


-egend of Kyrandia 


849 


Wherein World CSD DIx S5P 


-oom 


848 


Zool 


S34 


Lost Treasure Infocom 


S46 






_05t Treasure Infocom ^ aafa 






\^antis Exprimntal Fight 


rS45 
$45 


■ IBM STRATEGY 


Rebel Asault 






Return of the Phantom 


842 


A Train 


$34 


Rodne/s Funscreen 


S46 


A Train Conslnjction Set $23 


Secret Monkey Island 


839 


Air Force Commander 


$19 


Secret Weap Luftwaffe 


S4B 


Airbucks 


$36 


Sherlock Holmes 1 or 2 


844 


Ambush at Sorinor 


$42 


Space Quest 4 


S39 


Ancient Art ol War Sky 


$34 


Spirit of Excaliber 


332 


Archon Ultra 


$30 


Star Trek 25 Annversar/ S46 


Armada 2525 


$29 


Stronghold 


$36 


Ashes ol Empire 


$48 


Team Yankee 2 


S29 


Battle Isle 


$32 


Ultima Bundle 


S59 


Battle Isle Scenario Disk $22 


Ultima Underworld 1 a 2 S52 


Battles ol Destiny 


S36 


Where World CSD DIx 


$66 


Breach 3 


$36 


Wing Commander 1 DIx 


$48 


Buzz Aldrin Race Space S42 


W.Commandr / Ultima 6 $57 


Caesar 


S36 


W.Commndr/UltmaUWS5E 


Campaign 2 


$36 




'LINKS PRO 386 COURSE DISK 2 - PINEHURST' Is recog- 
nized as oneol the finestgoll resorts i n the world. Its Super VGA 
graphics stretches over rolling terrain, tree-lined lairways and 
undulating greens,, $19 




•SOUND GALAXY NX PRO 16' supports the 5 most popular 
sound cards. Features CD ROM interface, 16 Bit stereo 
playback with 20 voices at up to 1 4.4 KHz. volume ccnlrol. midl 
interlace, game port, 4 watt amp. and software setup. S169 




'AhAAZON' recap- 
lures the lun and ex- 
citement of the 
1 950 s drive-in mov- 
ies, Travel to unex- 
plored regions of the 
Amazon, lighnOloot 
ants, and find emer- 
alds stolen by Corlez. 
Amazing cinematic 
effects such as mul- 
tiple camera angles, 
flashbacks, zooms, 
pans, and fades. 
Features full digitized 
voices & sound ef- 
fects. 838 




DREADNOUGHTS 

iiccurately models 
the looks, specifica- 
tions and lactios ol 
lighting lleets during 
the great age of the 
batlleship. Includes 
7 scenarios such as: 
Coronel (1914), 
Falklands (1914), 
Jutland (1916) and 
DoggerBank(1915). 
Features a menu In- 
terface for entering 
commands, external 
3D view, & hidden 
movement, S39 



Capitalist Pig WIN $36 

Carriers at War $37 
Carriers at War Const Kil$37 

Carriers at War 2 $49 

Civilization S32 

Clash of Steel $42 

Cohort 2 St 8 

Conquer for Windows 842 

Conquered Kingdoms $36 

Conq Kingdoms Seen 1 S25 

Dune 2 S44 

El Fish $35 

Empire Deluxe $37 

Empire Deluxe WIN 835 

Fantasy Empires 836 

Fields of Glory $36 

Goblilins 2 824 

Lemmings 2; The Tribes $32 

Lost Admiral SI 9 

Lost Admiral Scenario $23 

Lost Admiral Enhanced S44 

New World Order 838 

Pacific Theater Ops 842 

Paladin 2 $34 

Perlect General $32 

Perlect General Seen 1 $21 

Perfect General Seen 2 $23 

Perfect General 2 $44 

Populous 2 $38 

Powermonger $34 

Railroad Tycoon Classic $22 

Railroad Tycoon 2 $39 

Red Zone $32 

Robo Sport WIN $34 

Rules of Engagement 2 $33 

Second Conflict WIN $34 

Seven Cities Gold 2 $38 

Shadow President $39 

ShadowGate WIN $32 

Sid Meir's Civil War $58 

Siege With Exp Disk $24 

Sim City 2000 $43 

Simfarm $41 

Simlife WIN $44 

Soldier of Fortune $42 

Space Hulk $38 

Spaceward Hoi $38 

Star Control 2 $36 

Task Force 1 942 $39 

Tegel's Mercenaries $38 

Tegels' Mercenaries 2 $44 

Theatre of War $17 

Vikings Fields Conguest $37 

War in the Gulf $34 

Warlords $12 

Warlords 2 $42 

When Two Worlds War $42 

Worlds at War $19 



IBM ROLE PLAYING 



Visa & MC Accepted. CODs S6. Checks He!d 4 Weeks, Money 
Orders Treated as Cash. fVlost Items Shipped Same Day. Ship- 
plngllmes rot guaranteed. Checkcompatibilitybeforeyou buy. 
Defectives replaced with same product. Prtce & availability 
subject to change. All Sales Final. 

Circle Reader Service Number 175 



2400 AD 


89 


ADD Collectors Ed 2 


$46 


ADD Starter Kit 


$29 


Bard's Tale Construction $27 


Black Crypt 


$32 


Celtic Legends 


832 


Challenge of 5 Realms 


$44 


Champions 


S37 


Champions ol Krynn 


$19 


CHARACTER EDITORS $16 


Cobra Mission 


$49 


Curse of Azure Bonds 


SIS 


Cyber Empire 


$32 


Cyber Space 


S39 


Dark Queen ol Krynn 


S3K 


Dari< Sun 


848 


Darklands 


339 


Darkspyre 


$32 


Daughter ol Serpents 


832 


Dungeon Master 


S34 


Dusk ol the Gods 


$24 


Elvira 2 Jaws Cerberus 


319 


Eye ol the Beholder 1 


319 


Eye ol the Beholder 2 


S3b 


Eye ol the Beholder 3 


842 



Legacy: Realm 01 Terror $34 



IBM ROLE PLAYING 



Legend $31 

Loremaster 839 

Lure of the Temptress $37 

Magic Candle 3 838 

MegaTraveller 3 $39 

Metal and Lace $49 

Might & Magic 4 836 

Might a Magic 5 $42 

Pirates S9 

Pirates Gold $42 

Planet's Edge $34 

Realms ol Arkania $37 

Red Crystal $38 

SpellJammer $38 

Spellcralt:Aspect Valor $38 

Stonekeep $54 

Ultima 7 Black Gate 848 

Ultima 7 Forge ol Virtue $18 

Ultima 7.S Serpent Isle $48 

Ultima Trilogy $39 

Ultima Trilogy 2 $48 
Ultima Underworld i or 2 $48 

Uncharted Waters $42 

Unlimited Adventures $38 

Veil of Darkness $37 

Waxworks 829 

Wizardry 6 Cosmic Forg $34 

Wizardry 7 Crusaders 342 



IBM ADULT 



Adult Reference CD 824 
Advent Brad Stallion CD 839 
Busty Babes CD ROM 832 
Centerfold Squares S21 

Ecstaoy CD ROM 332 

Femme Fatale $26 

Femm Fatale DD 1-3 Ea 318 
Jigsaw Pinups Si9 

Lovely Ladies CD ROM S38 
My Private Collction CD 336 
PC-Pix CD 340 

Penthouse Jigsaw XXX $24 
Planet of Lust S12 

Sex Olympics $24 

Sex Vixens from Space $12 
Strip Pokers $31 

Strip Poker3 DD 1-6 Ea $19 



IBM SPORTS 



ATP Tennis $34 

All Star Sports Pak $15 

American Gladiators $21 
Basketball Challenge $28 
Bo Jackson Baseball $19 
Carl Lewis Challenge $32 
Cycles Grand Prix 328 

D. Robinson NBA Action $44 
Face Off 89 

Front Page Football $39 
Front Page Football Pro $42 
Greens $34 

Hardball 3 $34 

Jack Nicklaus Sign. Ed $42 
Joe Montana Football 2 $42 
Links $29 

Links Courses 1-7 Each $17 
Links Pro 386 Golf $36 

Links Pro Course 1 or 2 $19 
Links Pro Course 3-6 Ea $20 
Michael Jordan In Flight $38 
NFL Challenge Prem Ed $59 
NFL Football $31 

NFL Proleague FB '92 $24 
NHLPA Hockey $38 

PGA Tour Golf WIN $3B 

QuarterPole $39 

Tony LaRussa Basball 2 $36 
T. LaRussa 2 Fntsy Man $14 
T. LaRussa 2 Stadiums $18 
T. LaRussa 2 '92 Teams $16 
W. Gretzky Hockey 3 $39 
W. Gretzky Leag Sim 2 $29 
Wilson Pro Stall Golf $23 
World Class Soccer $28 
OCT COM 1 



TEST LAB 




and refinement to an already 
capable PIM. 

Commence exhibits remarka- 
ble power. Its agent technology 
uses supercharged macros that 
launch themselves whenever pre- 
defined conditions occur — not 
just at a preset time^ For instance, 
you can tell Commence to auto- 
matically print out your to-do 
activities and appointments for 
the days you'll be gone the eve- 
ning before each of your trips. 

It's highly customizable — you 
can create entire applications 
with custom databases, custom 
iinks, and agents. Version 2.0 
adds an extremely versatile set of 
networking tools that can make 
Commence an officewide source 
of shared information and integrat- 
ed personal management tools. 

Best of all, however, is the 
interface, which is logical, intuitive, 
and pleasantiy easy to learn. Men- 
us for the powerful features (such 
as agents) remain out of your way 
until you want them, whiie buttons 
for the routine features (such as cal- 
endar, to-do lists, and phone dial- 
er) are right up front where you 
can't miss them. Commence feels 
natural; things work the way you 
expect them to. 

The linking system of Com- 
mence is also visible and under- 
standable. As you set up tasks, 
address book items, projects, 
appointments, and other basic 
data records, the dialog box 
shows the possible links, each in 
a list box of its own. Links include 



22 



COMPUTE OCTOBER 1993 



Commence 2.0— $395 

JENSEN-JONES 

Parkway 109 Office Center 
32S Newman Springs M, 
Red Bank, NJ 07701 
(908) 530-4666 



Relates to Project, Assigned to To- 
Do item, Relates to Note, and 
many more, with oniy appropriate 
links offered for the type of record 
being added. Thanks to these 
dialog boxes, you can use the 
PIM more effectively. 

I find Commence remarkably 
well balanced. Pifvls often have 
one module that serves as the 
base, around which all else 
revolves. You can't pick out such 
a base in Commence; ail the func- 
tions seem equai. Commence 
has no ax to grind, no vaunted sys- 
tem of personal management you 
must iearn. It's a neutrai tool that 
you can customize to emphasize 
your style. 

This PIM contains a number of 
pleasant extra features, including 
conference room scheduling (in- 
cluding display of floor plans and 
seating arrangements), expense 
reports, time-tracking and biiling 
reports, and simple Gantt charts. 

Drawbacks and weaknesses 



SPEAK UP! 



Is there a group of hardware or 

software products you'd like to 

see covered in an upconning 

Test Lab? Let us know by 

calling (900) 884-8681, 

extension 7010102 (sponsored 

by Pure Entertainment, 

P.O. Box 186, Hollywood, 

California 90078). The call will 

cost 95 cents per minute, you 

must be 1 8 or older, and you 

must use a touch-tone phone. 



are few. Task priorities are limited 
to a paltry 1 through 3. Version 
2.0's manuals are a little awkward 
because the company didn't re- 
write them from scratch. There's 
a new manual with version 2.0 
changes. Look there first; if your 
topic isn't there, use the version 
1.0 manual. 

Commence is ideal for some- 
one who needs to get to work 
quickly but may eventually need 
to create complex PIM applica- 
tions. It's flexible and powerful, 
yet easy to learn and use at its un- 
customized, basic level. 

Circle Reader Service Number 373 




Era Mrai izsi' 



'irwh*i(». 9i«iff. 



414 til 414 Imc 



^^rk Smarter, Get 

Organized and Ha\^ 

Fun at the Same Time! 



Choose from 6 
daily theme packs! 




Apiiomtmcnl Calendar fur Windows 



Elle Edit yiew Events Iheme Qplions help 




Introducing Appointment Calendar 

for Windows— software that makes 

getting organized fun and infonnative! 

Load Appointment Calendar for 
Windows and the daily theme pack of 
your choice onto your PC and you'll 
not only organize your busineSvS life, 
but your persona! life, too. Now it's 
easy to plan ahead, keep your appoint- 
ments and enjoy a daily message! 

Never be late for another meeting. 

Appointment Calendar lor Windows also 

reminds you when it's time for your next 
meeting. Attach the alarm icon to any appoint- 
ment or event and when the time arrives for 
that cvenl. the built-in alarm will sound. 

Making changes is a snap! 

Need to change or reschedule an 
appointment? Use your mouse to"dras and 
drop"" your appointnietu to a new date or time, 
or let Appointment Calendar for Windows auto- 
matically roll your lo-dos over to the next day. 

You can even take it with you! 

Appointment Calendar for Windows 
wiKMWS "f'^^''-'' '' calendar print-out in daily, weekly. 
CcfcdMTiiU: monthly or yearly formats, and 



you can print in a variety of sizes, 
including standard formats for DayTimers;' 
Day-Runners," Franklin Day Planner,' 
Rolodex'' Desk and Filofax.* 

Get Organized. 
It's simple— and fun! 

Each day when you open Appointment 
Calendar, you'll be greeted by a message from 
the theme pack of your choice. Not only will 
you get organized, you'll have fun in the process. 

Get Appointment Calendar for 

Windows PLUS the daily theme 

pack of your choice, for just $29— 

a savings of $59! 

Add S5 shipping and haniiling. Includes a dcfailcU 
u-scr's guide itnd [tthiiiciil supp<.in. 

Order now ! Call 

1-800-223-6925! 

fax t-3iy-395-7449 or mail your orders tor 

Ms TECHNOLOGY 
Oik Punom Oriiv, FO Box 100, ij.wiraf/ii?. loym S223J-0100 

Your priority code is 54e723K 

Appoinlmcnl CulcntJur Tor WindoHS is ulso iiviiilable 

at parlicipaling retailers naliunwide. 




Gnlf Digest — work on your 

swing, enjoy golf hmirnr and 

look al /Vnicricii's most beautiful 

aiici cliaileuging resort eourses. 




Tennis Masa/inf — improve 

your returns. It's simple 

with ilaiiy tennis tips and 

cartoons from ifie publishers 

of Tennis Magazine. 



J C ori.Waxo.'Eiu.i — 
' irv,(AHCTrarH-=;Effi 




B.C. — take a step back in time 
and gci a daily chuckle wilit 
those crazy cavemen of B.C. 



JjUWFiJti/tlP VuP 
fyMFtlWPJU/MP '^ 
ItJy/APJUMP 

JWPi/U/WP 




Wizard of Id — ciijuy the fun 

iinti humor of tlie Wizard of Id 

all year long. 




"•On I his Day in .Vnierica" — 

fa-Sfinatinj facts almui American 

hislorj' unfoid before your eyes, 

every day of the year. 



-wMm 






iiSU 



viWvilwv — 



Cop>righlC l'>J3 Pancn^ TcihrtJ^it^y. Inc. Al[ riiihMrMrtvcJ Atf ■illtniflUCaknklar iiJtraJfflnaADfPancniTechihrftig;. Inc". .All l.^^kHLiAi ;inJ mt^ tec nwkt dtM^iuUol a« sul1i 311: tiLuks 
Mii:giancd[tia:Uofll3eiFrc4Iw.l!vct>wj>.tvl1,C, ' l^^'J.K'n'JionSyn.iicale.rV Wijardof Id e 1993 Crcaiun SvTidicati;. 



Word for the Day — be inspired 

with a daily Bible verse and 

devotional thought. And smile 

each day witli a Chri.stian cartoon. 



TEST LAB 




DESKTOP SET 4.0 

Of all the PIMs examined in this 
month's Test Lab. DeskTop Set 
4.0 from Okna has the most pow- 
erful phone management system, 
accompanied by a first-class cal- 
endar and scheduling module 
and a printing calculator that 
allows you to put words on its 
tape along with the numbers. Writ- 
ten for mouse lovers, this pro- 
gram lets you do a surprising 
amount of work without ever touch- 
ing the keyboard. 

The phone management fea- 
tures are so remarkable that it 
takes some effort to shift your 
attention to other matters. Phone 
functions start with the address 
book, which offers unusual 
depth, with eight phone numbers 
per name, a window for business 
information and another for 
home data, and 32 blank fields 
for you to define. 

The dialer function in this PIM 
provides 21 push buttons for 
your most frequently dialed 
numbers. The dialer can handle 
international codes, long-dis- 
tance service codes, credit card 
calls, and least-cost routing. If 
you have Caller ID service In 
your area, DeskTop Set displays 
the cailer's personal information 
as you answer the call. Also, it 
creates phone logs of incoming 
and outgoing calls. Clearly, this 
personal information manager is 
a phone enthusiast's dream. 

Each name in the phone book 



24 



COMPUTE OCTOBER 1993 



DeskTop Set 4.0— $195 

OKNA 

12Rte. 17H, Ste. 212 
Paramus, NJ 07652 
(201) 909-8600 



can have an unlimited number of 
notes attached (up to 16K each), 
along with linked reminders, fol- 
low-up tasks, links to events, and 
even lini-is to files in other appli- 
cations that you can launch on 
the spot. Most of these functions 
reside in separate windows, so fer- 
reting out all your information on 
a person is a multistep task. PIM 
users concentrating on industrial- 
strength contact management 
may find the constant window div- 
ing tedious. 

Scheduling of time-related 
events is just plain fun, as you 
can often do it entirely without the 
keyboard. An ingenious event win- 
dow lets you click on a clock 
face to show time or paint a 
range on a time scale to shovi' be- 
ginning, ending, and duration 
times. From a list of common task 
descriptions you've created {den- 
tist appointment, weekly staff meet- 
ing, tennis at the club), you can 
select the tasi^ titie by mouse. 



In addition, you can set up any 
number of separately named to- 
do lists which are not time relat- 
ed. These tasks carry priorities 
and deadlines, and you can 
move or copy the tasks to your dai- 
ly to-do list as appropriate. Priori- 
ties run 1 through 10 only, 

DeskTop Set has an excellent 
icon-driven backup and restore 
function, which not only writes the 
data files to disk but compresses 
them as it goes. It also merges da- 
ta from a second computer's set 
of files (for users of laptop 
computers). 

DeskTop Set makes thorough 
use of the Windows interface. 
You can drag and drop many 
objects in order to copy, move, or 
link them into other modules. The 
right mouse button pulls up a float- 
ing, context-sensitive menu of 
appropriate function choices. By 
pushing to the limit, however, it 
does things with the mouse that 
are decidedly nonstandard in the 
Windows world. They make 
sense, but they can be disconcert- 
ing when you're not expecting 
them. In order to save desktop 
space, DeskTop Set uses smaller- 
thanmormal fonts throughout and 
makes many windows nonsiza- 
ble. This may be an advantage. 





Meet One Of Our Wildest Titles 



"Eye-popping, ear-tingling, mind- 
blowing" - Software Toolworks' 
products like The San Diego Zoo"' 
Presents The Animals!"' read more 
like hit movie reviews. Even 
Microsoft Chairman Bill Gates called 
The Animals! "...a must get!" at the 
1993 CD Expo. 



The Animals! is the latest in our 
multi-media edutainment series 
and just one of the dozens of titles 
from the world's largest supplier of 
CD-ROM Software. In fact, every 
four seconds of every business day, 
someone buys a Software Toolworks 
CD-ROIW. 



Look for The Animals!, Mario Is 
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^v^^^H^B r'or the dealer nearest you 
^r^'^^^'^H or to order, call loll-free 

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© 1995 The Sofware Toolworks, Inc All rights tescried The San Diego Zoo" Presents The Anlmalsf *ss designed by AmowiK, Inc. Programmed and pioduced by Amowiu tac 
and The Sodwaie TookxHks. Inc San Diego Zoo is a trademari of the Zoolojiial Society of San Diego All other product names are tiadcmaiks or registered trademarks of their lespectiie holdeis. 



TEST LAB 



Info Select 



..|ani. pmjK"- 



A-tl rtitfr ^^'t^' '* . , 



imiall 





but for me, using 800 x 600 res- 
olution, ttiings were a bit too 
small for comfort. 

DeskTop Set is a finely crafted, 
powerful tool for tracking plione 
activity, contacts, and daily sched- 
uling, containing tiundreds of sub- 
tle little toucties of elegance tfiat 
are delightful to discover. If your 
PIM needs run heavily to phone 
work, this is the program for you. 

Clrcle Reader Service Number 374 

INFO SELECT FOR 
WINDOWS 

Although Info Select for Windows 
lacks many of the features of the 
structured PIIVls found in this 
Test Lab, it's the only thoroughly 
personal manager of information 
in the bunch. 

That's because Info Select is 
almost totally free-form— if you 
want it to be. You can add any 
structure you desire, however— 
as much as suits your style. It's 
the most versatile, adaptable 
tool you're ever likely to see. 

Think of it as electronic stacks 
of paper. You can put absolutely 
anything you can type on paper 
(but not Windows graphics) into 
any stack. Once it's there, Info 
Select can instantiy retrieve any 
piece of paper (each in its own 
window) by searching in a varie- 
ty of clever ways. 

26 COMPUTE OCTOBER 1993 



Info Select for Windows— $149.95 

tlltlCROLOGIC 
P.O. Box 70 

iiackensach, NJ 07602 
(800) 342-5930 
(201) 342-6518 



That's the totally free-form 
style. A more structured alterna- 
tive involves using forms — 
windows with a data structure 
predefined, rather like paper 
forms. Info Select provides 19 
ready-made forms, including 
address book entries, phone mes- 
sages, fax covers, to-do lists, 
order forms, purchase orders, 
and so forth, it's a snap to design 
your own forms as well, including 
automatic features such as time 
and date stamps and sequential 
form numbering. 

With any stack, searching for 
individual windows of information 
is a snap. You can search for text 
matches using and, or, and the 
equivalent of not. A "neural" 
search checks for a list of words, 
returning a stack of windows with 
the most matches through the 
least matches. Date searches are 
easy, as are size searches 
based on the number of charac- 
ters in the window. 

If you've built your stack in 
dataliase format, each window 
has a data marker field, which al- 



lows you to sort Ihem — a good 
choice for an address book stack, 
for instance. Ivlail merge is availa- 
ble, as is an autodialer function. 

While Info Select is the very 
essence of flexibility, it doesn't pro- 
vide all the necessary functions 
of other PlMs. When possible. In- 
fo Select provides an equivalent 
function (such as the address 
book described above), but 
some functions are either missing 
or only partially covered. 

Take daily scheduling of 
appointments, for example. Info 
Select's tickler system works with 
any window containing two aster- 
isks followed by a date. Activat- 
ing the tickler searches these win- 
dows, showing you a stack of all 
items with today's date or earlier. 
This works, but it's a far cry from 
a standard PIM's daily schedule 
view and alternative week-, 
month-, and year-at-a-glance 
views. In addition, most PIMs al- 
so let you link appointments with 
contact records, notes, or other 
information. 

If you deal in free-form data 
that you'd love to be able to ac- 
cess instantly. Info Select is a 
dream come true. If you need a 
more formally organized tool, you 
might want to use Info Select on 
the side. Having ali that loose, ran- 
dom data instantly at your finger- 
tips is a powerful feeling. 

circle Reader Service Number 375 




"here's Sounc 



•^ii'i 



vroom, vroom 



.And There's SoundMan". 





SoundMari" 16. Get Real. 



SoundManl6 delivers sound so real, 85% of ttie time people can't tell the difference from live sound. 
That's because it's packed with the obsolute latest in sound board technology: up to 16-bit/44KHz 
record/playback, Yamoho OPL-3 stereo synthesis 20- voice chip, 1 00% Sound ^^ — 
Blaster"' and Ad lib compatibility, and more. SoundMan brings you the highest f^^^ - 
CD -quality sound available, for all your gomes and applications, in Window/s" ^ ' ^ 
and DOS. From Logitech, the peripherals leader. At your dealer, or call \M\\ tuH 

1-800-732-3025. TM/sfmiefliaits belong to terespativeowre. The Sensewore™ Compony 

circle Readsr Service Number 164 



TEST LAB 




IN HIS TIME 



For Christians who would like 
their PIIVis to help organize the spir- 
itual aspects of their lives as well 
as the daily grind of work, In His 
Time: The Christian Information & 
Resource Organizer is a, well, god- 
send. It brings management of 
prayers, Bible study, personal jour- 
nals, and spiritual meditation un- 
der the PIM's umbrella. While it 
doesn't try to match the most com- 
plex PIMs feature for feature, it's 
a highly polished program that 
shows capable professional pro- 
gramming throughout. 

In His Time is in the same gen- 
eral class as Lotus Organizer; it's 
simple and easy to learn, and it 
doesn't aim for the top of the mar- 
ket. Its basic metaphor is a smail 
notebook with side tabs for chang- 
ing sections. 

Its address book covers the 
basics nicely, capturing home 
and business addresses, four 
phone numbers, and spouse's 
name, along with a lOOO-charac- 
ter free-form note field. It doesn't, 
however, link to events or to-do 
items or dial phone numbers. It 
prints the address book (and oth- 
er information) in all the popular 
organizer book sizes. 

Appointment scheduling and to- 
do lists are similarly uncomplicat- 
ed. You can scheduie recurring 
items or normal appointments. A 
check box posts an appointment 
to your prayer list. The Events to 
Remember page reminds you of 

28 COMPUTE OCTOBER 1993 



In His Time— $79.95 

COLONNADE TECHNOLOGIES 
11820 Northuil Way, Ste. 200 
Bellevue, WA 98005 

(800) 84B-54B0 
(2De) 822-2977 



important upcoming dates. 

To-do item processing is simi- 
lar Priority choices are low, me- 
dium, high, and critical, numbered 
1 through 4 in most screens. A Mas- 
ter To-Do List box sets up recur- 
ring tasks. Both to-do items and 
appointments have 1000-charac- 
ter scrolling note fields. 

In addition to the normal print- 
ing options. In His Time also 
pnnts an elegant two-sided, sin- 
gle-page report that includes a 
monthly calendar, daily to-do 
items and appointments, your 
prayer list, events to remember, 
a daily devotional thought, and 
your scheduled Bible reading. 
Similar to OnTime for Windows' 
wonderful three-foid report, this 
single page is all you need to car- 
ry to organize your day. 

Each day's calendar page pre- 
sents a scripture from a variety of 
Bible translations. The Walk with 
Wisdom button pulls up a para- 
graph of commentary on the scrip- 



ture. (Additional daily devotional 
topics are available separately.) 

The Bible Reading plan lets 
you pick portions of the Bible to 
read this year, then creates a 
plan with specific chapters and 
verses for each day. 

The Daily Prayer Journal 
tracks your prayer requests, 
reminding you of items you want 
to pray about daily or weekly. 
Your appointments, to-do items, 
and upcoming events can also 
be posted to the Daily Prayer Jour- 
nal. When the prayers are an- 
swered, you record the details in 
the Praise Report section, 

A Topics section lists dozens of 
spiritual topics. Highlight one, and 
a half-dozen or so Bible referenc- 
es will appear. If you have a Win- 
dows Bible program, you can call 
up the Bible text through a DDE 
link. If not, you'll have to read it 
from the Good Book itself. You can 
personalize this section by editing 
topics and adding new ones. 

The Make a Joyful Noise sec- 
tion provides an appropriate dai- 
ly Christian cartoon, and you can 
create a daily journal by linking to 
any word processor. 

In His Time is a rich environ- 
ment for managing your spiritual 
life along with your daily activities. 

Circle Reader Service Number 376 




lafeiOt 



eaai 
EMM 




Lotus Organizer 



n^fvmr^trtl'yrr^a:^^ 



LOTUS ORGANIZER 

It had to happen. With Windows' 
graphic capabilities, someone 
was certain to give us a PIM in 
the form of an onscreen pocket 
notebook. Lotus Organizer does 
it brilliantly, delivering a fully real- 
ized low-end PIfvl in a virtual note- 
book that's complete down to the 
six rings in the middle and col- 
ored tabs down the side. And, 
best of all, it works. 

The notebook has tabs for six 
sections: calendar, to-do, 
address, notepad, planner, and 
anniversary. 

The calendar pages spread a 
week over two facing pages. Add- 
ing an appointment is great fun, 
using a clever mouse-dragged 



Lotus Ofganizer~$149 

LOTUS DEVELOPMENT 
55 Cambridge Phwy- 
Cambridge, MA 02142 
(800) 343-3414 
(6171 577-8500 



pair of tiny clocks to mark the be- 
ginning and end of the appoint- 
ment, it's the most effective, quick- 
est way to set times that I've 
found in any PIM yet. 

Instead of a number of daily to- 
do lists. Organizer has one list 
arranged chronologically by due 
date. Priorities are limited to 1 
through 3 only. Lengthy notes for 
to-do items and appointments 
involve linking to the notepad sec- 
tion. Create a link by clicking on 
an anchor icon on the source and 
again on the target. Once the link 
is created, click on the little link 
symbol to see what's available, 
and then move to the linked item. 
It's not as easy as having note 
fields or windows for each item, 
as many Plfvls do. 

You can, however, build more 
extensive links. Organizer can 
link any item to another applica- 
tion and file, including non-Win- 
dows applications. For instance, 
if you plan to write a letter to the 




ECCO PROFESSIONAL 

Arabesque Software's hot new 
personal information manager, 
ECCO Professional, shipped too 
late to make our deadlines. We 
can, however, give you some brief 
Information about it In Itiis sidebar. 

ECCO works in outlines, with 
each basic piece of information as 
an outline element. A normal 
to-do list might include "Finish 
painting the garage." That's the 
first-level outline entry. Under it, 
you can lay out the remaining 
steps, such as "Buy the paint," 
"Strip the old paint," and whatever 
else may be involved. Through link- 
ing, you can also show "Buy the 
paint" on your shopping list. 
Under that entry, you could add 
your notes on the color, ttie 
amount needed, and even a map 
of how to get to the store. These 
indented outline elements would 
show in both outlines. 

Outline items can be collapsed, 
expanded, moved, copied, or in- 
dented. Drag a name from the 
phone book to a time slot in the cal- 
endar, and ECCO creates a meet- 
ing. You can link items in any way 
imaginable; linked items show up 
in all outlines that they've been 
linked to. 

Once you get the hang of out- 
lines, you can move them into fold- 
ers, which group related items. 
You might have folders for proj- 
ects, coworkers, and so forth. 
With nested folders, you can organ- 
ize your work in virtually any way 
your mind can conceive. 

ECCO presents a new meta- 
phor — the outline — in a fully devel- 
oped, extremely useful program 
that's endlessly customizable. 
And surprisingly, it's easy to 
learn. If you find quick outlines help- 
ful in organizing your thinking, 
you'll fall in love with ECCO at first 
sight. 

ECCO Professional retails for 
$395, although the company is offer- 
ing a $99 introductory price "while 
supplies last." Call Arabesque Soft- 
ware at (206) 869-9600, or write 
the company at 2340 130th Ave- 
nue NE, Bellevue, Washington 
98005. 

—RICHARD O. ^MNN 



OCTOBER 1993 COMPUTE 29 



TEST LAB 




editor of COMPUTE next week, 
you can link Clifton Karnes's 
address record and a to-do item 
dated next week to your word 
processor, assigning a filename 
for the letter. Then, from either 
place, clicking on the link symbol 
would run the word processor 
and open that file. 

The address book presents a 
small page per entry with three 
user-defined fields, two phone 
numbers, and an unlimited text 
note field. You can change the dis- 
play to show as many as six 
abbreviated entries per page. 

Notepad keeps any kind of 
text you wish. Each note has a 
title, which is used to create a 
table of contents. Many of your 
notes, of course, will be linked to 
other parts of the program. 

The planner section comes on 
a clever foldout page that shows 
a year at a time. On this long- 
range planner, you can mark out 
15 different time spans for things 
such as vacations and major 
projects. 

Finally, the anniversary section 
tracks recurring dates of impor- 
tance, such as birthdays and 
anniversaries. 

Organizer isn't meant to com- 
pete with the full-scale PIMs. By 
limiting its scope, Lotus made 
Organizer so easy to learn and 
use that you'il be up and running 
within a half hour. If you don't 
plan to keep thousands of ad- 
dress records, don't need to shuf- 
fle dozens of tasks a day, and 

30 COMPUTE OCTOBER 1993 



PackRal 5.0— $395 

POLARIS SOnWARE 
17150 Via del Campo, Ste. 307 
San Diego, CA 92127 
(800) PACKRAT 
(619) 592-7400 



don't have dozens of appoint- 
ments and meetings a day — all of 
which could overwhelm the infor- 
mation presentation abilities of 
Organizer — then Organizer is an 
excellent choice. 

Circle Reader Service Njmber 377 

PACKRAT 5.0 

PackRat 5-0 is more than a P!M; 
it's practically an entire operating 
environment. Among its many 
functions are desktops that 
include not only PackRat objects 
but icons to run other applica- 
tions, even DOS apps. 

PackRat's metaphor is file fold- 
ers. Each file foider — you can 
have as many as you want — has 
a tab on top; all you have to do 
is io click on the top to change 
folders. Each folder is a desktop 
unto itself, containing a selection 
of PackRat objects, icons for oth- 
er applications, and OLE client 
objects (parts of files from other 



programs open on your desktop 
in PackRat without running the oth- 
er applications). 

PackRat objects include all the 
normal PIM functions and many 
more. Each of the 30 objects is a 
mini application window, including 
such functions as clock, commit- 
ments chart, list viewers, calendar, 
to-do list, day or month view, doc- 
ument manager, memo pad, spell- 
ing checker, and so forth. 

With all these tools available, 
you can create a desktop folder 
with everything needed to work 
on a certain project, including 
your spreadsheets and word-proc- 
essing documents, without ever 
leaving PackRat. Third-party ob- 
jects for PackRat are in the 
works, such as MapLinx demo- 
graphic data and MasterSoft file 
viewers and converters. 

All of this customizability, if pre- 
sented with blank folders, could 
be overwhelming. PackRat's 
Smar tStart function lays out a set 
of standard folders for 11 typical 
occupations, including sales/mar- 
keting, legal, medical, and real 
estate. Pick the one that comes 
closest to your occupation, and 
PackRat will give you a good start- 
ing point. 

This new version of PackRat 
uses all the latest interface innova- 




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extroordinory photos of nature and animals; SCENIC STILLS with striking 
photographic backgrounds, textures, and famous locations; ond WORK- 
ING STILLS with stunning photos of business and industry. All include 
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TEST LAB 




tions. including tabbed pages (fold- 
ers), drag-and-drop object move- 
ment and linking whenever possi- 
ble, and right-button clicking for 
floating custom menus that relate 
to the object in question. 

Unusual features of PackRat 
include financial journals, which 
are essentially check registers for 
financial accounts with reconcili- 
ation routines built in; the docu- 
ment manager, which nnaintains 
an annotated database of docu- 
ments that you can launch at any 
time; a full macro programming 
language; and a project manag- 
er compiete with Gantt charts. 
(Unfortunately the project manag- 
er and two other objects did not 
ship with the initial copies of Pack- 
Rat; they're promised within a few 
weeks.) 

It's safe to assume that Pack- 
Rat can handle any normal PIM 
function, though perhaps not 
always as quickly and directly as 
in some of the simpler PIMs. With 
its incredible power comes com- 
plexity, which occasionally gets 
in the way of otherwise simple 
things. All that power makes it 
slower than its simpler competi- 
tors as well, it's easy to become 
impatient as you wait for PackRat 
to load, switch folders, or pull up 
dialog boxes. 

You also might get the impres- 
sion that Potaris wasn't quite fin- 
ished with PackRat when it was 
shipped. A 92-page supplemen- 
tal manual documents changes 
and additions after the main man- 
ual went to press, and a long 



Sharhware— Si 29.95 

COGNITECH 
P.O. Box 500129 
Atlanta, GA 31150 
[800) 4SSHARK 
[tm] 510-4577 



README file covers changes to 
the supplemental manual. Com- 
bined with the missing objects men- 
tioned above, it makes you won- 
der if too much emphasis was 
placed on shipping the same 
week as two major new competi- 
tors and an upgrade of another, 
Nevertheless, there is no ques- 
tion that PackRat is the most pow- 
erful, most feature-rich general 
PIM available and that its new 
move into desktop management 
through folders takes it a step 
ahead of the field. 

circle Reader Service Number 37B 

SHARKWARE 

In his three best-selling books, 
beginning with How to Swim with 
the Sharks Without Being Eaten 
Alive, Harvey Mackay shares his 
secrets of success. He says that 
it's not what you know or even 
whom you know that leads to suc- 



cess, but what you know about 
whom you know. In short, contacts 
and networking are everything. 

Working with Mackay, Cog- 
nitech has created a powerhouse 
PIM called Sharkware. It auto- 
mates Mackay's system, down to 
the smallest details, and even 
includes an audiotape to build en- 
thusiasm for the system. It's not 
just a PIM; it's a v/ay of life. 

Even if you don't want to adopt 
the entire Mackay methodology, 
Sharkware can still be a fine PIM 
choice, It handles all normal PIM 
tasks, including linking between 
contacts, appointments, and to- 
do items; keeping phone logs 
and contact histories; and attach- 
ing unlimited free-form notes to 
almost anything. Then it goes on 
to give you an arsenal of unique 
Mackay-designed custom tools. 

Take the Mackay profiles. The 
Mackay 5 are general principles 
of success. The Mackay 66 are 
detailed questions that capture 
essential contact information. 
Additional questionnaires help 
you analyze your employees, un- 
derstand your competitors, and 
evaluate potential employers. 
The Mackay system teaches you 
to use all this information effective- 
ly in networking and understand- 



SHARKWARE 



32 



COMPUTE OCTOBER 1993 





He was a sales force of one. Until he got CompuServe. 
Now he's a force to be reckoned with. 



He was confident he could sell just about anvthino 
to just about anyone. There was oniv one catch. The 
competition wasn't scared. He was. 

But then he jjot CompuServe, and neoi^lc 
noticed clients and competition alilcc. 

That's the impact of CompuSer\e. The informa- 
tion service that links vou to information and resources 
typically available only to big companies. 

Make more contacts than ever, with E-mail, 
fax capabilities, and international communications 
(for the price of a local phone call). Access dozens of 
professional lorums and share information with industry- 
insiders and experts. Compile research on markets, 
prospects, and competitors through reference libraries 



containing archived, full text from thousands of 
magazines, newspapers, newsletters, and other sources. 
Pull news off the wire as it happens. Book flights and 
hotels directly. There's even haixKvarc and software 
support, because you don't have time for downtime. 

A one-time membership fee and S8.9S a 
month let vou use our basic services as often as you 
like. You'll receive die first month free. Plus, there 
are hundreds of other services available at nominal 
additional charges. For more information or to order, 
sec vour computer dealer or call 1 800 848-8199. 
Outside die U.S. and Canada, call 1 614-457-0802. 

ffl. CompuServe* 

The information senice you won't outgrow.™ 



Circle Reader Service Number 205 



TEST LAB 




ing people. It's powerful stuff. 

Then there's the contact data- 
base. The predefined screens cap- 
ture the traditional information, 
including four phone numbers and 
as many addresses as you might 
have (you can include vacation 
homes and so forth). Moving to the 
custom fields screen, you find 
fields for family information and cus- 
tomer profiles. That's over 60 
fields already, but you can define 
up to 10 million additional field 
sets with up to a thousand fields 
in each. And there's no limit to the 
number of contacts. 

Sharkware, then, is a potential- 
ly massive personalized custom 
database for your contacts. It can 
quickly set you up to track virtu- 
ally any specific data sets you 
can imagine— with the only prac- 
tical limits being hard disk space 
and your willingness to enter all 
the information, 

The screens are always full of 
information, but it's organized 
well enough to keep it from being 
overwhelming. While Sharkware 
is no pushover to learn, it's not un- 
duly chaiienging. either. Again, 
the organization makes sense; it 
doesn't often leave you wonder- 
ing how to do something. 

As with almost any first version, 
there's plenty of room for improve- 
ment and refinement in Sharkware. 
While the interface is generally 
good, it could be streamlined in a 
dozen places with logical short- 
cuts, such as typing the first few 

34 COMPUTE OCTOBER 1993 



YburWay 3.0— $99 

PRISMA SOFTWARE 
401 Main SL 
Cedar Falls, lA 50613 
(800) 437-2685 
(319) 266-7141 



letters of a field and having poten- 
tial matches pop up. In this ver- 
sion, getting to the right contact or 
the right choice in a list box often 
seems cumbersomely slow, I also 
expect to see redialing, a way to 
set recurring events, and more 
than three to-do priority levels in 
subsequent versions, 

Sharkware is a power-hungry, 
RAM-eating beast, On a 486/25 
computer with 4MB of RAM, it's no- 
ticeably slow, and it seems to be 
constantly accessing the Windows 
swap file. The minimum: RAM re- 
quirement is 4MB, but 8MB is rec- 
ommended, with good cause. 

If you have the hardware to run 
it and want to benefit from the ac- 
cumulated wisdom of the Mackay 
method, you'll find Sharkware to 
be an intensely powerful, laserlike 
tool for your quest to success. 

circle Reader Service Number 379 

YOURWAY 3.0 

If you tried YourWay in an earlier 
version and didn't like it, come 
back for another look. Virtually a 
nevj product, YourWay now of- 
fers additional PIM features that 
make it worth a look, and the 
price is right at S99. 

YourWay's heart is a visually 
presented card file. You navigate 
the fanned-out deck of cards 
with alphabetical tabs or by 
searching for a specific text 
string. The program comes with 
a Preformatted simple address 
and phone file, but you can quick- 
ly set up a contact database 
using whatever fields you like. 
Each card file database is a 
separate file, so you can have as 
many card files as you want — 
but you can work on only one at 
a time. 



Each card holds as many as 
50 fields of information, Unlike 
most address book functions, 
however, these fields have no 
types — you can put any data in 
any field. Each card has an exter- 
nal note attached, holding up to 
TO, 000 characters of free-form 
data. Linking from cards to 
events or phone logs is easy, but 
it only works with the card on top 
of the deck. 

Daily calendaring and to-do 
list handling are together on a cal- 
endar-page screen that shows dai- 
ly events, daily tasks, master 
tasks, and daily calls. Items on 
the two task lists show priorities 
with a letter (A-C) an6 number (1- 
6) combination. A daily task is 
one you plan to finish the day you 
record it; a master task wilt 
stretch over many days. 

Each task, event, or call has a 
dialog box that includes a scroll- 
able note field for free-form 
notes. Tasks also have fields for 
categories, due dates, and per- 
sons assigned to the tasks, as 
well as a timer for tracking 
elapsed time on the task. 

Appointment scheduling is 
weak. The small daily events sec- 
tion shows up to nine lines and a 
scroll bar. You can't see the 
whole day's schedule at once, 
The week-at-a-glance and month- 
at-a-glance screens show either 
summary info (two daily tasks, 
one daily call) or the first couple 
of words of each entry for the 
day Neither is particularly infor- 
mative. To get a truly useful dis- 
play of your daily information, you 
need to print it in one of the many 
organizer book formats available. 

The reporting module is inno- 
vative and interesting; clicking on 
the Reports icon pulls up a blank 
spreadsheet, YourWay provides 
four basic reports; Card and 
Note reports (generated from 
card file information), as well as 
Free Event Time and Activity 
reports (generated from the 
events, calls, and task lists). Call- 
ing up any of these reports pops 
up a dialog box where you pick 




*cv;X, 



'5:^^^ 



iicRosoFT®FtiGi-rr SiMuiATaR®" 
For DOS Systems m 







v^..^.-;. 



"**k 



^Sr^ 





. -^ -■^■• 



t^'- 



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For more information or to order call 

l-80aWEB^EET 



r 993 .V;o!:=id SsTw-arf 



Circle Reader Service Number 198 




TEST LAB 




the various report elements. The 
time- and tasl<-related reports are 
unimpressive, but the card- 
based reports give you a lot of flex- 
ibility in reporting on your basic 
database information. 

YourWay really shines at data 
import; you can lay out your card 
file with fields in the same order 
as the source data. 

YourWay is best suited for 
database-reiated work, whether 
it be your address book or other 
personal data that lends itself to 
a card file metaphor. If you're look- 
ing for ease of use, power 
enough to handle future growth, 
and flexibility in data handling, 
YourWay is a natural for you — 
and the price is easy to take, too, 

circle Reader Service Number 330 



CALENDAR SOFTWARE 



If you don't need all the features 
of tfie Windows personal informa- 
tion nnanagers covefed in this 
nnonth's Test Lab. maybe a good 
calendar program is what you 
need instead. Here are two. 

ONTIME 

Is your desk buried in scraps of 
paper reminding you of appoint- 
ments, messages, and assign- 
ments? OnTime, a calendar pro- 
gram available in both Windows 
and DOS versions, can help you 
organize that clutter into a com- 
prehensive calendar. 

OnTime is a combination ap- 
pointment book, to-do list, pocket 
secretary, desktop planner, and 
alarm clock, it can display your 
sctiedule by the day, week, or 
montfi and can maintain your calen- 
dar to the year 2079. Ttie program 
will also alert you to conflicting 
appointments as you schedule 
them. 

One of OnTime's most useful op- 
tions is its print capability, On one 
sheet of paper, OnTime can print 
your itinerary for the day week, 
and month that you specify; your 
to-do list; and a list of important 
dates such as birthdays and anni- 
versaries. When you fold the print- 
out in thirds, it becomes a bro- 
chure of your personal schedule. 




-i 


■■■ f. ,. = .;:„,:,-.,:„, : " li[. 


[,ir U>^ Ylf l» 


-i\ .„ ._, j ,,i.., ...imin.ui 


] 




<*'«! J>1 




lul's Monthly Schedule ■; 

July l'.)j;; 




m 




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4 5 


^ 7 6 '9 11) 


1 >«. ,,^,..,1„ " 1 


H^a^E™ 











The Windows version 1 .5 of OnTime lists for 
$129.95, while the DOS version 2.5 is S69.95. 
For more information about the product, con- 
tact Campbell Services at 21700 h^lorth western 
Highway. Suite 1070. Southfield, Michigan 
48075; (800) 345-6747. 
Circle Reader Service Number 383 



CALENDAR CREATOR PLUS 

Even with trie multitude of caien- 
dars on the market, it's still difficult 
to find one that's exactly what you 
need. Spinnaker Software's Calen- 
dar Creator Plus, in both Windows 
and DOS versions, lets you design 
your own. 

Both versions give you a wide 
range of design options, including 
control over calendar format, font 
selection, print colors, and paper 
size and orientation. You can also 
include scalable clip art in or 
around the calendar. While both 
versions give you the flexibility of 
using scalable fonts, the Windows 
version lets you use any of your 
TrueType or Type 1 fonts. 

Calendar Creator Plus for Win- 
dows has a few more features 
than its DOS counterpart. It 
comes with the PowerAlbum, an 
electronic clip art book with near- 
ly 300 images in nine categories. 
Events lists for national and 
international holidays and famous 
birthdays are also included with 
the Windows version. 'Versions 1.0 
for Windows ($79.95) and 5.0 tor 
DOS ($69.95) are available from 
Spinnaker Software, 201 Broad- 
way, Cambridge, Massachusetts 
02193; (617) 494-1200. 
Circle Reader Service Number 384 
—PHILLIP MORGAN and LISA YOUNG 



36 



COMPUTE OCTOBER 1993 




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from leading 
computer 
companies. 

Thousands of men and women 
working in the Computer Science field 
throughout the U.S. and around the world are 
earning their degrees through the AICS non- 
traditional program. You can be one of them. 



For a free 
catalogue call: 
1-800-767- AICS 

Outside U.S.: 
1-205-323-6191 
Fax 1-205-328-2229 
2101-CCF 
Magnolia Avenue 
Suite 200 
Birmingtiam, AL 35205 



AMERICAN 
INSTITUTE 

COMPUTER 
SCIENCES 

We leading edge of learning 



TEST LAB 



Windows PIM Features 




ACT! for Windows 1.1 


Ascend 4.0 


Commence 2.0 


DeskTop Set 4.0 


General 


RAM required 


ma 


2MB 


3MB 


2MB 


Hare disk space — fully installed 


Sf'/IB 


2MB 


6MB 


3MB 


Uninstall feature 


n;: 


yes 


described in manual 


no 


DDE/OUE 


yes/no 


yes/yes 


yes/no 


yss/no 


Macros supported 


yes 


yes 


yes 


no 


Telephone/Address BookyContact Management 


Autodial/redlal 


yes/yes 


yes/yes 


yes/no 


yes/yes 


Links phone log with contact lile 


yes 


yes 


yes 


yes 


Automatic follow-up reminders 


no 


yes 


yes 


yes 


Customizes field names 


yes 


no 


yes 


yes 


Maximum fields per record 


70 


33 


50 


72 


Maximum cliaracters per note field 


unlimited 


unlimited 


30,000 


16,000 


String searcti of note fields 


yes 


yes 


yes 


r,o 


Ptione numbers per entry 


5 


5 


customizable 


a 


fySaximum number of records 


unlimited 


unlimited 


16,000 


unlinited 


Calendar/Time Management 


Scfiedules recurring events 


yes 


yes 


yes 


yes 


Warns of schedule conflicts 




yes 


yes 


yes (visually) 


Snooze alarm 


yoi 


yes 


yes 


yes 


Can change time increments 


yes 


no 


yes 


yes 


Drag-and-drop schedule items 


yes 


yes 


yes 


yes 


User can include entries from otfier modules 


no 


yes 


yes 


yos 


To-Do Lists/Task Management 


Sorts lists by priority 


yes 


yes 


yes 


yes 


Attaches notes to tasks 


no 


yes 


yes 


yes 


Assigns tasks to others 


no 


no 


yes 


no 


Task alarm 


yes 


no 


yes (via agents) 


yes 


Roils uncompleted tasks forward 


yes 


no 


yes (via agents) 


yes 


Printing 


Prints labels/envelopes 


yes/yes 


yes/yes 


yes/yes 


yes.'yes 


Reduced sizes for DayTimer, Franklin, and so on 


no 


yes 


yes 


yes 


User-defined reports 


yes 


yes 


yes 


yes 


Word Processing 


Form letters 


yes 


no 


yes 


yes 


Full access to Windows fonts 


:,•.-.,; 


yes 


no 


yes 


Letter templates 


yes 


no 


yes 


no 


Spelling checl<er/lhesaurus 


yes/yes 


no/no 


yes/no 


no/no 


Uses name/add with Windows word processors 


no 


yes 


yes 


yes 


Import/Export 


Import formats 


DBF. TXT, RTF. PackRat. 
Maximizer. Lotus Organizer 


ASCII 


ASCII. DIF. dBASE 


ASCII (CSV). Windows 
Cardfile 


Export formats 


DBF. TXT 


ASCII 


ASCII. DIF. 
dBASE 


ASCII (CSV) 



38 COMPUTE OCTOBER 1993 



Windows PIM Features 


Info Select for Windows 


In His Time 


Lotus Organizer 


PackRat 5.0 


Sliarkware 


YourWay 3,0 




2MB 


2MB 


2r^B 


2MB 


4MB 


2MB 


750K 


4.8WB 


3MB 


8MB 


7MB 


1.5MB 


no 


no 


no 


no 


no 


no 


no/no 


yes/no 


yes/no 


yes/yes 


yes/no 


ycs/no 


no 


no 


no 


yes 


no 


yes 




yes/no 


no/no 


yes/yes 


yes/yes 


yes/no 


yes/yes 


no 


no 


no 


yes 


yes 


yes 


yes 


no 


no 


yes 


yes 


yes 


yes 


no 


yes 


yes 


yes 


yes 


NA 


29 


15 


unlimited 


unlimited 


50 


30,000 


1000 


unlimited 


32.000 


2.000 


;-.noo 


yes 


no 


yes 


yes 


yes 


yes 


unlimited 


4 


2 


50 


4 


SO 


10.000.000 characters 


unlimited 


65,000 per section 


unlimited 


unlimited 


5000 




no 


yes 


yes 


yes 


no 


yes 


no 


yes 


yes 


yes 


yes 


yes 


no 


no 


yes 


yes 


yes 


yes 


no 


no 


yes 


yes 


yes 


yes 


no 


no 


yes 


yes 


yes 


yes 


no 


no 


yes 


yes 


yes 


yes 




no 


yes 


yes 


yes 


yes 


yes 


no 


yes 


yes 


yes 


yes 


,es 


no 


yes 


no 


yes 


yes 


no 


no 


yes 


yes 


yes 


yes 


no 


no 


yes 


yes 


yes 


yes 


yes 




yes/yes 


yes/no 


yes/yes 


yes/yes 


yes/yes 


yes/yes 


no 


yes 


yes 


yes 


yes 


yes 


yes 


no 


no 


yes 


limited 


yes 




yes 


no 


yes 


no 


yes 


no 


yes 


no 


yes 


yes 


yes 


no 


no 


no 


yes 


no 


yes 


no 


no/no 


no/no 


no/no 


yes/yes 


no/no 


no/no 


yes 


yes 


yes 


yes 


yes 


yes (ttirough macros) 




ASCII 


ASCII (CSV) 


ASCII (CSV), dBASE III and 
IV, Windows Cardfile 


ASCII, Paradox, dBASE, 
Excel, B-Trieve 


ASCII. dBASE IV 


TXT. CSV, dBASE, 
DIF, Windows CardlHe 


ASCII 


none 


ASCII (CSV) 


ASCII, Paradox, dBASE, 
Excel, B-Trieve 


ASCII, dBASE IV 


TXT, CSV, dBASE, 
DIF, Wirjdows Cardfile 



OCTOBER 1993 COMPUTE 39 



.95 MACH. NINETY FEET ABOVE 


THE GROUND. BOTH SIOES 


TRYING TO SHOOT HIM OOWN. 


WOUNOEO IN THE ARM. NAPITAN 


ALENANOER lUYEV GUIOEO HIS 

MiG-29 TO FREEOOM 

LEFT-HANOEO. COOLO YOU? 





On May 20, 1989 MiG-29 pilot 

Alexander The pilot who vfrote 
, the book oiAe MiG-29, 

Zuyev began Aiexand^^/^teUs 

a desperate 

plan to steal 

the Soviet 

Union's most advanced combat 

aircraft and fly it to political 

asylum. 




Tlirkish air defenses to land safe- 
ly on a civilian airfield in Turkey. 

THE FINEST TECHNOLOGY 
RUBLES CAN BUY 

The plane he f\ew is the MiG- 
29 Fulcrum, the crown- 
ing achievement of 4b 
Soviet aeronautics. —' 

Now, with 



NOTHING WAS LOST IN THE 
TRANSLATION 

The flight model was pat- 
terned after actual Mikoyan- 
Gurevich (MiG) design specs. 



4 



So you can be 
every system 
control is 
ingly J ^ 

all 



sure that 
and every 
painstak- 
accurate, 
the way 




Shot in a life 
and death struggle with the sen- 
try, Zuyev managed to take off. 
Then, flying dangerously low to 
avoid radar, he eluded pursuing 
fighters and deadly Soviet and 



MiG-29: Deadly Adversary of 
Falcon 3.0^ Spectrum HoloByte's 
add-on to Falcon'^ 3.0, you can 
climb into the cockpit of the 
F-16's nemesis. 



down to 
the Russian-accented 
cockpit warnings. 

IT'LL TEST YOUR SKILL 
AND YOUR PATRIOTISM 

Unlike the F-16, the MiG-29 

isn't a fly -by- wire aircraft, so a 



For Visa/MasterCard orders call 24 hours a day, 7 days a week: (800) 695-GAME. 
For technical questions call (510) 5224164 (M-F: 9AM-5PM Pacific Time), 



computer never 
limits your con- 
trol inputs, whether 
inspired or foolish. 
Its twin Isotov RD-33 
engines produce 36,600 
lbs. of thrust, to the F-16's 
25,000. And superb aero- i 
dynamics make it control- 
lable at low speeds and 
high angles of attack that 
would have enemy pilots 

fight- 
ing to 
avoid 
a spin. 



\ 



The tnostfear- 
smtie opponent 
is a human 
one. With 
EBS, up to six 
players can go 
head-to-head. 



SPECTRUM 

m 

HOLOBYTE 



THEY WON'T EVEN 
KNOW WHAT HIT THEM 

Your MiG's IRST (Infrared 

Search and Track) system 

can track an F-16 without 

revealing your presence on 

his threat display. So you can 

get on his six o'clock before 

he even knows you're there. 

Once in range, you'll be able 

to lock on to the Fklcon just 

— • by turning to look at him 

^ withtheMiG-29'shelmet 

mounted sight. Then call 

"pusk" (launch) as you fire 

missiles or "ogon" (firing) as 

you ventilate him with your 

computer-accurate 30mm 

gun. Either way, his plane will 

make a satisfying crunch 

when it hits the ground. 



Next time you have an F-W 
glued to your tail, try the 
MiG-29's "Cobra" 




■' . TnuTteuver. 

l)You 

pull up ^^^^^^^ 

past a 90 '^ ^^^^^ 2) Your 
alpha ^r^ ^^9 airspeed 

climb. ^ ' drops rapidly; 

the F-16 zooms 
past 

THE 
ELECTRONIC " 

BATTLEFIELD SERIES: 

THE ULTIMATE 
CYBER-BATTLEFIELD 

EBS is the first series of inter- 

connecting simulations. Each 

title works with the others to 

bring you closer to the real thing 



Now you can choose from multiple 
aircraft, multiple theaters, even 
which side of the conflict to fight 
on. And you can Wouabruptly 

pitch the nose 

go head-to-head backtoievei 

J flight. Now 

over a modem or you're on his 
with up to six _A ^^£ 

score to 

settle. 




players over a 
network. It all 
begins when you add 
on MiG-29 to Falcon 3.0. 

Anything more realistic 
wouldn't be a simulation. 





1IIH!:H 




Choose your weaporu 
Tlie Falcon is lethal at 

Umg distances. The 
F\dcTum,, deadly close- 
in. Now you can fly for 
either side. 




MiG-29 add-on requires Fklcon* 3.0. Available on IBM compatibles. 



Spectrum HoloByte 





ELECTBONIC BATTKHELP 

The fight of your life. 




Circle Reader Service Number 201 



NEWS & NOTES 



Jill Champion 



For travelers, 

the simply designed 

Diskette 

Wallet from ACCO 

securely 

transports lour 

dishs in a 

loam-padded 

nylon case. 



Environmentally Correct 

A number of computer manu- 
facturers are joining tfie 
Green movement as part of 
the ERA'S voluntary Energy 
Star program, wtiicti encourag- 
es PC maimers to incorporate 
energy-efficient tectinology in- 
to tlieir designs. Specifically, 
Energy Star computers are 
thiose tfiat eithier operate at 
less than 30 watts in their nor- 
mal state or power down to 
30 watts or less to save ener- 
gy when not in use. 

Compaq is designating a 
number of its computers as En- 
ergy Star PCs as part of its 
own initiative, called Design 
for Environment, to incorpo- 
rate sound environmental prin- 
ciples into Compaq products. 
This initiative includes energy- 




efficient computers, CFC-free 
manufacturing processes, 
and product recyclability. In- 
tel announced that its entire In- 
tel486 microprocessor fami- 
ly — including the Pentium — is 
now available with energy-ef- 
ficient technology, allowing 
PC manufacturers to design 
energy-efficient desktop sys- 
tems that can exceed the 
EPA's Energy Star program 
requirements. IBM recently 
introduced its PS/2 E line of 
desktop PCs; these PCs incor- 
porate a number of the ener- 



gy-saving features of laptop 
computers, including a flat- 
panel display and an automat- 
ic sleep mode that powers 
down to less than 20 watts 
when the computer isn't in 
use. During normal use, the 
IBM PS/2 E consumes 60 
watts of electricity per hour, 
compared to the 150 to 220 
watts consumed by most desk- 
top PCs. 

Virtual Fiction 

How original can one more 
book about sex. drugs, and 
movie stars be? Not very. So, 
why would a publishing 
house even bother with this 
one? It's a computer-authored 
novel — partially, that is. The hu- 
man author, Scott French, 
spent eight years and 
$50,000 of his own money cus- 
tomizing an artificial Intelli- 
gence program to 
"think" like the late Jac- 
queline Susann to 
help him write a 
Susann-style novel. 
The result is the 295- 
page Just This 
Once (hardback; 
Birch Lane Press, 
1993), with drugs, 
sex, suicide, and de- 
pression among four 
self-indulgent Holly- 
..__ wood brat types you 
couldn't care less about. If 
Susann had written it herself, 
she probably would have add- 
ed another 295 pages— and 
hopefully enough of a plot to 
make the $18.95 price worth- 
while. In other words, don't 
look for this one to show up 
on the New York Times best- 
seller list. 

XyWrite for Windows 

XyWrite loyalists (plenty of 
whom are in publishing) don't 
often hear the words new ver- 
sion in conjunction with Xy- 
Whle. But this favorite word- 
processing and text-editing 
program of writers and edi- 
tors everywhere now has a 



new lease on life. XyWrite for 
Windows, announced by The 
Technology Group, which ac- 
quired XyWrite in 1992, was 
scheduled for an August re- 
lease and should be available 
by the time you read this. 

The new proprietors wisely 
left XyWrite's unique com- 
mand line interface intact 
while adding some fantastic 
new features made possible 
only by Windows' powerful ca- 
pabilities. For example, with 
Log and Resume, you can cre- 
ate multiple notebooks to 
hold different work projects; 
Auto Replace lets you pro- 
duce your own glossary of 
shorthand notation (personal 
abbreviations that are automat- 
ically expanded when you 
type them in); Styles helps 
maintain uniform formatting 
throughout extensive writing 
and editing projects, such as 
books with numerous chap- 
ters spread out in separate 
files; a comprehensive library 
of buttons lets you create an 
unlimited number of format 
and button-bar sets that in- 
clude your most often used 
commands; and there's much 
more. XyWrite for Windows is 
available for $495 from soft- 
ware and electronics super- 
stores by special order. For 
special introductory and up- 
grade prices, current XyWrite 
users and those who use com- 
petitive word processors 
should contact The Technolo- 
gy Group at 36 South Charles 
Street, Baltimore, Maryland 
21201; (410)576-2040, (410) 
576-1968 (fax). 

This Is No Flight Simulator 

Instead of flying in an endless 
holding pattern because of 
ground fog or heavy precipita- 
tion, planes will soon use 
their own synthetic vision to 
land you safely — even in near- 
zero-visibility conditions. 

The FAA and the U.S. Air 
Force, with the help of re- 
searchers from two Georgia In- 



42 COMPUTE OCTOBER 1993 



Bad Day ii Bagdad! 




You've been cast out of the palace as a beggar. The princess has 
turned against you. The palace guards want your head on a sl<ewer. 
And you haven't even had breakfast yet. This is not good. 4i It gets 
worse. One minute you're fleeing for your very life across roof tops. 
The next, you find yourself washed up on a desert island... or amidst 
ancient ruins, face to face with a disembodied head (and boy is it 
hungry!). This is really not good, it You stumble upon quicksand, 
serpents, spikes, magic spells, a skeleton with a sick sense of humor, 
and then... well... things get just a mite tricky, it Introducing 
Prince of Perm 2®: The Shadow & the Flame':' Some call it a dozen 
Arabian Nights movies rolled into one. Actually, it's your worst 
Arabian nightmare. i» So get some sleep. Once this 
swashbuckler begins, you may never sleep again. 



^Bfoderbund 



PULSE-QUICKENING ACTION • RICH MOVIE-LIKE STORY AND SOUNDTRACK • INCREDIBLY REALISTIC ANIMATION 

A CINEMATIC ACTION G.«IE BV JORDAN MECIIKEK • SUGGESTED RETAIL PRiCE: 569.95 {MS-DOS VERSION). SEE YOUR LOCAL DEALER OR CALL 
1-800-521-6263 A,\D REFER TO CODE 2B1 TO ORDER AT A 2.5% S..\\TNGS. • REQUIRES 10 MHZ 286 OR FASTER MACHINE. HARD DRI\T: AND VGA REQUIRED. 

©1 993 BrffiiertjuncI Software. Inc. Prince ol Persia is a reBlslered iradema.'k and TlK Sliadoiv a Ihe f iame is a Iradomark ol BrKtertjund SoUwaie. All rights reseived. 
Circle Reader Service Number 245 



NEWS & NOTES 



stitute of Technology labs, 
are experimenting with syn- 
thetic vision (infrared sen- 
sors and millimeter-wave 
[MMW] radar) to penetrate 
the kind of thick fog, haze, 
and precipitation that can 
blanket an airfield and 
make landings treacherous. 
The infrared sensors pro- 
vide the pilot with a realtime 
perspective of the runway on 
a head-up display (HUD), a 
glass screen that unfolds in 
front of the pilot when in use. 
Instead of blocking the pi- 
lot's normal view, however, 
the HUD'S holographic im- 
age appears to "float in 
space," according to Brian 
Hudson of Georgia Tech, 
one of the principal research- 
ers in the program, "The syn- 
thetically generated image al- 



lows the pilot to actually vis- 
ualize the runway rather 
than merely guess its loca- 
tion. As the plane descends 
into clearer, lower altitudes, 
the synthetic innage lines up 
directly with the actual run- 
way view through the cock- 
pit window, requiring little 
mental transition on the part 
of the pilot, who can easily 
continue on into the final 
landing approach." 

If this program yields suc- 
cessful results, computers 
will eventually be able to do 
more than just autopilot com- 
muter planes, jumbo jets, 
and military aircraft; they'll 
help bring these aircraft safe- 
ly to the ground when they 
might otherwise have been 
stuck in a holding pattern cir- 
cling the airport. 



Government by fhe People 

The best link is a direct link. 
especially when it comes to 
making your voice heard in 
Washington. The White 
House and Congress need 
a piece of your mind, not 
meaningless statistics from 
the latest "nonpartisan" po- 
litical pundits and pollsters 
who supposedly give voice 
to what you think. Give 
them all a piece of your 
mind using Political Action, 
a software package that 
acts as your personal D.C. 
lobbyist. The program can 
generate dozens of letters, 
telegrams, mailgrams, and 
faxes to the Washington "ma- 
chine" as easily as it can 
generate one. Political Ac- 
tion has a built-in database 
of Congressional members. 



White House staff members, 
governors, political interest 
groups, business execu- 
tives, Supreme Court justic- 
es, foreign leaders, and 
even news anchors and oth- 
er members of the press. 

Enter your message, se- 
lect your targets (the presi- 
dent, the Speaker of the 
House, the Senate minority 
leader, and the Washington 
Post, for example), and 
press a few keys to dis- 
patch your message to the 
entire group. Letters can be 
transmitted via Compu- 
Serve, AT&T EasyUnk Serv- 
ices, fvlCI Mail, or GEnie; 
faxed; or printed and mailed. 
The program also includes 
biographical information 
about members of Con- 
gress, hypertext versions of 



IF YOURJBIDEA DF A GDDD TIME 



IS SITTING ALDNE IN THE DARK: 



sitfjifiiiSs- 



FIGHTING OFF EVIL FORCES 



P^.-5^ 



TIL THE SUNBCDMES UP 



the Constitution and the Dec- 
laration of Independence, a 
list of government BBSs, 
tips for effective action, and 
complete online help. Sug- 
gested retail price is $195. 
Contact Political Systems, 
200 Seventh Avenue, Suite 
200, Santa Cruz, California 
95062; (800) 945-5973, 
(408) 462-9338 (fax). 

Free Nets for All 

Community computing sys- 
tems, better known as free 
nets, seem to be increasing 
in number as of late. Current- 
ly, there are 25 of these 
much-needed network servic- 
es operating in the United 
States and several other 
countries, and dozens more 
appear to be about to start. 
Such nonprofit networks — 



usually funded by grants, 
fund-raisers, donations, and 
sometimes annual user fees 
of no more than, say, $20, 
and most often based at a 
college or university — offer 
access to vast amounts of 
information, including public 
government records and doc- 
uments, education and busi- 
ness information, and medi- 
cal and legal advice, which 
you can access from your 
home if you have a comput- 
er and modem. However, 
most of the free nets have 
public-access terminals in 
various locations, such as at 
a public library, so the infor- 
mation is available to virtual- 
ly everyone (which is the 
whole idea), Those who tradi- 
tionally have been left out of 
the information-technology 



boom of the last decade, 
the elderly and the poor, for 
instance, now have a 
means to interact with oth- 
ers and become computer- 
literate through these net- 
works. Also, communication 
and information aren't lim- 
ited to a network's communi- 
ty; through the Internet, a 
global network of more than 
a million computers, users 
can communicate with oth- 
ers around the world and 
search for and retrieve infor- 
mation worldwide. 

Unencumbered Disks 

If you're looking for a disk 
storage unit for home or of- 
fice use, you're bound to 
find something that meets 
your needs, with the abun- 
dance and variety now avail- 



able on retailers' shelves. If 
you're planning to travel 
with your disks, however, 
take a closer look at a neat 
new product from ACCO. 
The Diskette Wallet is a light- 
weight, nylon-fabric case 
that holds four disks, is 
foam padded for travel secu- 
rity, and has a Velcro clo- 
sure. The wallet's simple de- 
sign is what makes it so ap- 
pealing. Available in black, na- 
vy, or wine, the wallet for 3V?- 
inch disks retails for $6.99, 
while the wallet for 5y4-inch 
disks retails for S8.99. 

If you would like to have 
more information on the Disk- 
ette Wallet, contact ACCO 
USA, 770 South ACCO Pla- 
za, Wheeling, Illinois 60090- 
6070; (708)541-9500, (800) 
247-1317 (fax). D 



..you rd\i Hm^mwM \\i\j. 




A mouse and keyboard are fine for tackling 
spreadsheets, not teeming legions of 
blood-thirsty marauders. State 

of-the-art CyberMan" puts an unlimited 

range of motion within your grasp: 

three directions [x, y, and z] and three 

rotations [pitch, yaw, and roll]. 



3D INTERACTIVE 
CDNTRQLLER 



Just move or twist it any way you 

want to go. Plus it's the only con 

troller with vibrating feedback that 

lets you feel the action. CyberMan is 

100% compatible with conventional 

mouse applications, and comes with 3D game 

titles that will pull you into the next dimension in 

PC entertainment. CyberMan is available now at 

your local dealer, or call 1-800-732-2923. 

^^ Trademarks belong to their registered owners. 




The Sensewo re 'Company 

circle Reader Service Number 2SS 



FEEDBACK 



Larger-tiian- 

life help, electronic 

Bibles, sound 

measurements, game 

construction sets, 

and reluctant printers 



Amplified Feedback 

Last month, we gave some 
tips for operating Windows 
withi larger type. Since there's 
no way (within Windows) to en- 
large the typeface used in Win- 
dows Help files, fvlicrosoft 
recommended an alternative 
for visually impaired Windows 
users. 

The following programs (all 
of which work in both DOS 
and Windows) will enlarge the 
display to facilitate reading 
small print. 

Business Focus (Artie Tech- 
nologies; 313-588-7370); f\^AG- 
ic and fvlAGic Deluxe (fvli- 
crosystems Software; 800-828- 
2600); #9 GXi. #9 GXi TC, 
and #9 GXE (Number Nine 
Computer; 617-674-0009); Vis- 
ta (Telesensory; 415-960- 
0920); and ZoomText Plus (Ai 
Squared; 802-362-3612). 

The following programs 
will read a Windows screen to 
you. 

SLIMWARE WINDOW 

BRIDGE (Syntha-voice Com- 
puters. 416-578-0565), out- 
SPOKEN for Windows 
(Berkeley Systems; 510-540- 
5535), Protalk for Windows (Bi- 
oiink Computer Research and 
Development; 604-984-4099), 
and Screen Reader/2 (IBM; 
800-426-4832). 

Also last month, a reader 
wrote in to remind us that the 
Bible was available on sever- 
al CD-ROM products. Here 
are some of them, 

King James Electronic Bi- 
ble (Compton's Newfvledia; 
619-929-2500); The Bible Li- 
brary and The New Bible Li- 
brary (Ellis Enterprises; 405- 
749-0273); CD WordLibrary 
(Logos Research Systems; 
206-679-6575); tvlulti-Bible (In- 
notech; 416-492-3838); and 
fvlaster Search Bfble, Compar- 
ative Bible Research, and fvlas- 
ter Search Bible, Concise Edi- 
tion (Tristar Publishing; 800- 
292-4253). 

THE EDITORS 
GflEENSBORO. NC 



The Good Book 

Thank you for your very com- 
plimentary review of PC Study 
Bible ("The Bit, the Byte, and 
the Word," April 1993). Even 
as your April issue arrived, 
Biblesoft began shipping ver- 
sion 3,1 of PC Study Bible, 
which directly responds to 
two of Mr. Moses' points. 

A Bible window can now 
be divided into as many as 
six "panes." These panes can 
be linked to display different 
translations of a single Bible 
reference, or unlinked to dis- 
play different references. You 
can add or remove panes 
from a Bible window at any 
time, using the keyboard or 
mouse. 

Mouse support in version 
3.1 has been greatly extend- 
ed, including access to all key- 
board shortcuts, a dou- 
ble-click function to copy ma- 
terial to PC Study Bible's built- 
in notepad, and much more. 

Mr. Moses raised a critical 
issue in his conclusion when 
he stated, "Some might ob- 
ject to what they regard as re- 
ducing the Bible to a data- 
base from which you extract 
the bits of information you 
want without regard to a 
whole literary context; the ba- 
sic unit of the Bible is not, af- 
ter all, the verse, but the 
book." 

Our desire to maintain a 
"whole literary context" is re- 
flected in our newest add-on 
module— The Treasury of 
Scripture Knowledge. Treas- 
ury is a collection of nearly 
one million cross references re- 
lating each key phrase in a Bi- 
ble verse to other passages 
that reflect the same thought 
or topic. 

Finally, I would like to clari- 
fy our pricing structure. Bible- 
soft publishes six translations 
of the Bible, along with five 
classic references — all of 
which are available as inde- 
pendent modules. In addition, 
we offer four distinct starter 



sets. The KJV and NIV ver- 
sions of PC Study Bible (com- 
plete with a concordance, a 
notepad, and Nave's Topical 
Bible) are available for 
$69,95. The Master Edition 
adds one translation and the 
Nelson's Bible Dictionary mod- 
ule, all for $149.95. The Refer- 
ence Library Edition adds the 
three modules that enable 
Greek-Hebrew word study; 
Strong's Dictionary, Vine's Ex- 
pository Dictionary, and Eng- 
lishman's Concordance, for a 
suggested retail price of 
$239.95. The Treasury of Scrip- 
ture Knowledge add-on mod- 
ule is available for $49.95. 

KIRT WILLIS 
BIBLESOFT 
SEATTLE, WA 

Sounding Board 

The sound card article in 
the June 1993 COMPUTE 
Test Lab covered a good 
selection of cards and de- 
scribed the features and 
attributes of each well. 
However, there were some 
technical problems with the 
test results. 

The first problem was with 
the choice of a 10-kHz signal 
for the measurements made 
with a 22-kH2 sample rate sig- 
nal. For harmonic distortion, 
measurements are made of 
the energy in the harmonics 
of the side wave signal. The 
first harmonic of a 10-kHz fun- 
damental is 20 kHz, yet the 
cutoff of the system at 22 kHz 
is below 11 kHz. 

In fact, the signal itself was 
probably attenuated, and any 
harmonics were well past the 
bandpass of the system. 
Those measurements should 
have been made with a 1-kHz 
signal, which is the customary 
frequency, partially because 
it's near the peak sensitivity of 
the ear to distortion. 

Second, since a large per- 
centage of the cards were 
capable of 12- or 16-bit 
playback, couldn't you 



46 



COMPUTE OCTOBER 1993 



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FEEDBACK 



have made measurements there, 
too? 

DAVID STEIGERWALD 
SILVER SPRING, MD 

Tom Benford replies: Our objective in 
designing the teste for the Test Lab sec- 
tion is to provide performance data 
wt:icfi simulates real-world conditions 
as closely as possible. Since tlie vast 
majority of sound effects, music, and 
other audio found in today's popular 
software titles is in the W-kHz rather 
than the 1-l<Hz neighborhood, the 10- 
kHz signal was selected for our tests, 
and all of the cards were tested using 
It, thus providing a true performance 
profile for these products at that fre- 
quency. While it's true that several of 
the sound cards were capable of 12- 
or 16-bit playback, not all of them 
were. By using an 8-bit data format, all 
of the cards could be Included in the 
tests. Eight-bit sound Is the most com- 
mon format in recreational products 
today 

Lingua Franca 

I'm impressed with the quality of the 
games that are being produced today. 
What specific compilers are software 
companies using to create IBM-com- 
patible games? 

RODNEY S, COCKRELL 
GREAT RALLS, MT 

If the games are complied by a com- 
mercially available compiler. It's prob- 
ably one of the major C languages. 
Odds are, however, that the software is 
being produced by home-grown compil- 
ers developed In-house at the develop- 
ment company These compilers use li- 
braries and techniques that are trade 
secrets and will probably never be avail- 
able commercially. That accounts for 
the look and feel of games that let us- 
ers Instantly recognize, for example, a 
Sierra, Origin, or MicroProse game. As 
a sidelight, representatives from Ac- 
cess (makers of Links 386 Pro, related 
golf programs and course disks, and 
adventure games) recently visited our 
offices and pointed out that all Access 
games are developed in machine lan- 
guage because It results in faster 
code. 

Look Before You LPT 

About six months ago, I inherited a 
Commodore PC10-III XT-compatible 
with an internal hard drive and two flop- 
pies. I would be grateful if you could 
give me some advice with a problem 
I'm having. I can't get the Learn DOS 




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program to print on my printer. 1 
should be able to print by pressing 
Shift-Print Scrn, but all I gel is thie mes- 
sage Unable to print on your printer: 
Checl< printer setup and try again, All 
the application programs I have print 
beautifully on LPT2. 

JAMES W, GOODMAN 
OAKVILLE. ON 

Your letter implies tliat itie printer is 
connected to LPT2, not the more com- 
mon LPT1. Stiift-Print Scrn is hard-cod- 
ed to send Its output to LPT 1. l-lere's a 
program tliat will fake DOS into think- 
ing that the printer at LPT2 is aiso at 
LPT1. Type it in as a text file exactly as 
is, using either Edit (if you have DOS 5 
or 6) or Ediln (if you have an earlier ver- 
sion of DOS). Name the file 
LPT2T01.SCR. Leave In the blank line 
you see before the rex line, and make 
sure you type the values in the db 
tines exactly as shown; one wrong tet- 
ter or number and you'll have to reboot 
when you run the program. 



db B3 QO 00 8E D8 A1 OA 04 
db A3 OS 04 BO 00 B4 4C CD 
db 21 C3 

rex 
12 
nlpt2to1.com 

w 



Then run Debug on it. 

debug < tpt2tDl.scr 

This will create the program 
LPT2T0TC0M. From now on, just run 
that LPT2T01.COM to redirect the out- 
put of LPT2 to LPT1. 



Do you have a question about hard- 
ware or software? Or have you discov- 
ered something that could help other 
PC users? If so, we want to hear from 
you. Call our special "Feedback" line: 
(900) 884-8681, extension 7010201 
(sponsored by Pure Entertainment. 
P.O. Box 186, Hollywood. California 
90078). The call will cost 95 cents per 
minute. You must be 18 or older, and 
you must use a touch-tone phone. Or 
write to "Feedback" in care of this 
magazine. Readers whose letters or 
calls appear in "Feedback" will receive 
a free COf^PUTE baseball cap while 
supplies last. We regret that we cannot 
provide personal replies to technical 
questions. D 

Circle Reader 
Service Number 275 



EDITORIAL 

Editor c. <Tofi Karnes 

Art Director Rcbin C Case 

Managing Editor Oavid English 

Features Editor Robcrl GiKt)y 

Reviews Editor Mike HucJnall 

Gazette Editor Tom Neisel 

Enlertainmenl Editor Denny Alkin 

Senior Copy Editor Karen Hullman 

Copy Editor Margaret Ramsey 

Editorial Assistant Polly Criipam 

ContritHjting Editors Sylvia Granam. Eddie Hutfrrian. 
Tony HoDeris. Karen SiepaK 

[ntems Piiiiirp Morgan. Lisa Young 

ART 
Assislanl Art Director Kenneth A Hardy 
Designer Kali^ MurdOCk 
Cl>py Production Manager Terry Cash 
PRODUCTION 
Production Manager Dg Poller 

Tralffc Manager Barbara A, Williams 

PROGRAMMING & ONLINE SERVICES 

Manager frny Tuc^-er 
Programmers Bilxo w B&.vrlGn 
Slave Ofapei 
Bradley M Small 

ADMINISTRATION 

Presidenl^ COO Kglh/ Keelon 



Executive Vice President 

Operations 

Editorial Director 

Operations Manager 

Oirice Manager 

Sr. Adrninialrative Assistant 

Administrative Assistant 

Receptionist 



William Tynan 



Keilh Ferreli 
Oavid HensSey Jr. 
Sybil Agee 
Julia Fleming 
Lisa G, Casinger 
LeWanda Fo« 

ADVERTISING 
Vice President, Pgter T Johnsmeyer 
Associate Publisher (2121 496-6100 

ADVERTISING SALES OFFICES 
East Coast Riii.F, :. -Peter T Johns- 

mayer, Chris Co-:> ' ".'■■ .:...:■' riternalJonai Ltd 

1965 Broadvray, Me;v York, NV 10023. 1212) -tOfi-olOO Soulheas: - 
Harnei ftogers, 503 AST, SE, WashirHjlon, D.C, 20003; (202) 616- 
5926, Florida J U, Remer Associates, 3300 I^E 192nd Si.. Suite 
192, Avenluia, FL 33180: (305) 933-1.167, (305) 933-8302 (FAX). 
Midwest Rjll-Fage and Standard D^play Ads— Starr Lane, Nation- 
al Accounls Managen 7 Maywood Or, , Danville, IL 61832, (217) 4'ia- 
4042, 1217) 443-4043 (FAX) Delroil— Jim Chauvin, 1400 N 
Woodivafd A« , Sute 1 1 , B oomWd Hills. Ml 48334; (313) 433- 
1016, (313) 433-1201 (Fax). Norihwesi Jefry Thompson. Jules E 
Thompson Co . 1290 Hov;ard Ave , Suite 303. Builmgarrye. CA 
94010. 14 15) 34e«22. bjciBe Denns (707)451-4209 Soulhivesl— 
Hoivard Berman, 6728 Eton Ave , Canoga Ftaik, CA 91303; (818) 
992-4777 Product Mar; Ads— Lucille Dennis Jjies E. Thcmpson 
Co , 1290 Howard Ave , Suite 303. Burlingame, CA 94010; (707) 
451.8209. UK & Eumpt^Beverly Wardale, Flat 2, 10 Staflord Ter- 
race London WB7 BH, England; 011-471 1-937-1517. Japan— 
Iniercjrcup Communications, Ltd,, Jiro Samba, President; 3F Tiger 
Bidg 5-22 Sniba-Koen, 3-ChoT^, Ntinaio ku, Tokyo 106, Japan, 03- 
434-2607 Ciassllied Ads— Mafia Manaseri 1 Wooos Ci . Huniing- 
lon. m 11743; (TEL/FAX) (5t6) 757-9562 

TME CORPOflAnON 

Boh Guccione (chairman and CEO) 

Kaitiy Keeton (vice-cha«rman) 

David J. Mysrson (presidenl ana CEO) 

William F Marlieb (president, marketing, sales and circulation) 

Ralrick J, Gavin (senor vice president and CFO) 

Rictiaid Cohen (executive vice president and treasurer} 

Frank DeVino [executive vico piesidenl, graphics director) 

Jim Martise(execulive vice presitlent, circjlation) 

Jeri Winston (executive vice president, coiporate sen/ices) 

Hal Halpner (vice president, director of manufacturing) 

William Tynan (vice president, technology and informatidn 

services) 

ADVERTISING AND MARKETING 

Sr. VP/Corp Dir , New BuS!-;eS5 Development Beveit^ Wardale; VP/ 
Or. Group Advertising Sales Nancy Keslenbaum; Sr VP/Soulh- 
ern and Midwest Advertising Di F^ier (Soidsmiih Offices New 
York: 1965 Broadway. New York, NY 10023-5965, Tel (212) 496- 
6100. Telex 23712S. filidwest; '11 EasI Wacker Dr . Stile 508, Qica- 
go. IL 60601; (312) 819-0900 (312) 819-0313 (FAX). South: 1735 
K St NW. Suite 903, Washington, DC 20006. Tel, (202) 728.O320. 
West Coasi: 6728 Eton Ave,. Canoga Park, CA 91303, Tel, (818) 
992-4777 UK and Europe Flai 2. lOSlallord Terrace, London W87 
BH, England. Tei. 011-4711-937-1517 Japan fnlerg-oup Jiro Sem- 
ha. Telex J25469IGLTYO. Fax 434-5970. Korea: Kaya Advtsng 
he . Rm, 402 Kunshin Annex BID 251-1, Dohwa Dong, Maoo-Ku, 
Seoul, Korea (121), Tel 719-6906, Telex K32H4Kayaad 

ADMIHISTTIAnON 
Sr VP, CFO: Patrick J Gavin, EVP/Corporale Sen/ices: Jen Vfm- 
ston; VP D;ractor Sales Pron-iotons Beverly Greiper; Hr, M&vsstano 
Circulation: Paul Rolnck, Dir. Newsstand Opefations: Joe Gallo 
Dir Subscfiplion Circulation Beatrice J Hanks: VP Director ol Fte- 
I search Robert Rattner, Advertising Production Oitector. Charlene 
Smith: Advertising Production Traflic Mgr : Pam Rizk; Traffic Dir 
William Harbull: Dir,, Budgel and Finance Tom Malay; Product-on 
Mgr. Tom Slinson: Asst Production Mgr Nancy Rice; Mgr. intcr- 
naiional Dlv,; George i^jas; Exec, Assl to Bob Guccione: Diane 
OConnell, Exec. Assl. to Oavld J. Myerson Ten Pisani. Special 
Asst. 10 Bob Guccione. Jar>e Homlsn. 



WINDOWS WORKSHOP 



Clifton Karnes 



BECOMING A HELP 
POWER USER 

Nothing can transform you in- 
to a power user faster than the 
ability to get the right informa- 
tion about Windows and Win- 
dows applications when you 
need it. And no tool can deliv- 
er this crucial info faster than 
Windows Help, 

In this column. I'm going to 
talk a little about Help and how 
to use it. Next issue, I'll talk 
about how you can create 
your own Help files. 

Most of us have used Help 
at one time or another. Help is 
on the menu bar of almost eve- 
ry Windows application, press- 
ing the F1 hot key summons 
Help for most apps, and many 
dialog boxes have a Help but- 
ton you can press, 

If you call Help in any one 
of these ways, the Help win- 
dow will pop onto your 
screen. Now the fun starts. But 
before we dive into Help itself, 
let's back up and look at what 
Windows Help really is. 

Windows Help is an applica- 
tion, WINHELP.EXE, that 
loads and displays Help file 
documents, which always 
have an HLP extension. 

You can run WinHelp by 
choosing Run from Program 
Manager or File Manager and 
typing winhelp.exe. Windows 
Help will run without a Help 
document loaded. To view 
any Help file, choose File, 
Open from the menu bar. Try 
this now to gel a feel for all the 
HLP files in your WINDOWS 
subdirectory. 

You'll also note that Win- 
Help's menu bar has its own 
Help option. This calls Help on 
Help in a second Help win- 
dow. Now, on to the details. 

Help files usually consist of 
a Contents page and several 
Topic pages. When you 
choose Help Contents from 
the menu bar, you'll see the 
Contents page. As the name 



implies, this is like a table of 
contents, giving a broad out- 
line of what the file covers. 

Click on any underlined 
green text (green is the 
default), and you can jump 
to that topic. 

When you're reading a top- 
ic, green text that appears 
with a dotted underline has a 
pop-up definition. Click on 
these words, and a window 
with the definition pops up on 
your screen 

When you look at the Help 
window, you'll notice a row of 
buttons just below the menu 
bar. These are quick naviga- 
tion buttons. 
The Contents 
button takes 
you back to 
the Contents 
page, Search 
calls up a dia- 
log box that 
lets you search 
for l<eywords, 
Back moves 
you to the pre- 
vious topic, 
and History dis- 
plays a dialog 
box of the top- 
ics you've viewed. In addition 
to these standard buttons. 
Help authors can add their 
own. You may, for example, 
see browse buttons, marked 
<< and >>, that move you 
backward and forward 
through the available topics. 
You may also see a Glossary 
button that fists ali the pop-up 
definitions throughout the 
Help file. 

All that is pretty standard. 
Following, however, are some 
specialized features that are 
worth exploring. 

First, if you Iqo1< at the File 
menu, you'll see an option for 
Print Topic. As you'd expect, 
this prints the current topic. 
Very useful. 

Under the Edit menu, you'll 
see Copy. If you select this, 
the entire topic is displayed in 
a text Vi/indow, and you can 



copy text from it to the Clip- 
board and from there to any 
Windows application. 

Directly under the Copy op- 
tion on the Edit menu is Anno- 
tate. This is one of Help's neat- 
est features. Select this, and 
you'll be treated to a dialog 
box in which you can put any 
notes about the current topic. 
After you make an annotation, 
a small green paper clip ap- 
pears by the topic title. You 
can click on the paper clip to 
bring up the annotation. 
These annotations are stored 
in your WINDOWS subdirecto- 
ry with the Help file's name 



flit 14* tUnimwk tlrlp 



The Runner Utilities 

f OH mcaosor i whdows 3.1 



in 



JnlfOducrlor} 



iWlnRunnfr 



j TMiiRunntr 




plus the extension ANN. 

Perhaps the neatest Help 
feature is Bookmark, which 
lets you place named book- 
marks on any topic. The Book- 
mark names appear as Book- 
mark menu items. If you use a 
Help file often, this is a real 
timesaver. Bookmarks are 
stored in your WINDOWS sub- 
directory in a file named WIN- 
HELPBfvlK. 

The last feature of Help I 
want to discuss is Help, Al- 
ways on Top. This will keep 
the Help window from being 
buried by other windows. I nev- 
er use this one, but I can see 
how it could have its uses. 

That's the quick tour. To get 
your feet wet with Help, make 
a practice of loading the Help 
files for your favorite applica- 
tions and browsing them from 
time to time, D 



Windows Help Is 
an application, 
WINHELP.EXE, that 
loads and 
displays Help tile 
documents. 



OCTOBER 1993 COMPUTE 51 



INTRODOS 



Tony Roberts 



Delete Sentiy 

provides a teirific 

insurance policy 

against accidental 

deletion of 

important tiles. 



RECOVERING 
DELETED FILES 

One of DOS 6's best features 
is ttie expanded functionality 
of the Undelete command. 
The new Delete Sentry feature 
makes recovering deleted 
files as close to a sure thing as 
possible. 

Before we discuss how to un- 
delete files with Delete Sentry, 
it's heipful to know what actu- 
ally happens when you issue 
the command to erase a file. 
First, the initial character of the 
filename in the File Allocation 
Table (FAT) is changed to a 
special character that signals 
DOS that the file has been de- 
leted. Second, a series of point- 
ers that describe the file's po- 
sition on the disk are zeroed 
out. This tells DOS that the clus- 
ters occupied by the file are 
now available for other use. 

Immediately after afile has 
been deleted, most of the file- 
name, as well as all of the 
file's data, remains intact on 
the disk. Another data tidbit 
that isn't affected by the dele- 
tion is the FAT reference to the 
file's size and starting cluster 
number. 

With these bits of informa- 
tion, you can recover a delet- 
ed file — as long as you haven't 
overwritten the disk clusters oc- 
cupied by the file. 

At its basic level, this is how 
Undelete works: It scans the 
FAT for a file that's been 
marked as deleted, it shows 
you the filename with the miss- 
ing first letter and asks you to 
fill that in, and then it goes to 
the starting cluster and lo- 
cates an amount of data that 
corresponds to the file's size. 
This works well if the undelete 
procedure occurs immediate- 
ly after the deletion and if the 
deleted file wasn't scattered 
all over the disk. 

A step up from basic un- 
delete protection is Delete 
Tracker, a version of which 



first became available in DOS 
5. Every time Delete Tracker is 
activated (usually through a 
command in your AUTOEX- 
EC.BAT file), the system 
makes a snapshot of your 
disk's FAT This procedure 
makes deleting a file a little 
less risky. That picture of the 
FAT gives the Undelete com- 
mand full information about 
the characteristics of your file 
as of the last boot-up. This in- 
formation includes the first let- 
ter of the filename plus a iistof 
every cluster that was occu- 
pied by the file. Even if the file 
was strewn all over the disk, Un- 
delete can recover it if the clus- 
ters haven't since been occu- 
pied by another file. 

The new feature in DOS 6 — 
Delete Sentry — makes undelet- 
ing almost foolproof. Under 
this system, deleted files are 
not actually deleted but are 
moved to a hidden subdirec- 
tory on your disk where they re- 
main fully intact. When you 
need to undelete a file, DOS 
simply moves it back to its orig- 
inal directory. 

As effective as this protec- 
tion is, it too is only transient. 
Deleted files don't stay in the 
hidden subdirectory forever, 
so it's always best to recover 
deleted files as soon as possi- 
ble after the deletion. When 
you configure Delete Sentry, 
you decide how much disk 
space it can use, how soon to 
purge files from the hidden di- 
rectory, and which files 
should be protected. 

For example, on my 200MB 
hard disk, I allow Delete Sen- 
try 5 percent, or 10MB, of 
space. Once I've deleted 
more than lOMB of files, De- 
lete Sentry starts deleting the 
oldest files in its holding area 
to make room for the new de- 
letions. Also, I set Delete Sen- 
try to purge files that have 
been on hold over seven 
days. Finally, I've configured 
Delete Sentry not to save files 
with extensions such as TMP, 



BAK, and the like. 

There are a couple of ways 
that you can configure Delete 
Sentry. If you're running Win- 
dows, run Undelete and select 
Options, Configure Delete Pro- 
tection. Delete Sentry. Enter 
your preferences into the result- 
ing dialog box. Alternatively, 
you can edit the UN- 
DELETE. INI file directly. This 
file is in the same directory as 
UNDELETE.EXE unless you've 
set the environment variable 
MSDOSDATA to point to a dif- 
ferent subdirectory. 

The entries in UN- 
DELETE. INI are straightfor- 
ward. For more information. 
type help undelete at the DOS 
prompt to get a full rundown 
on configuration options. 

If you use Delete Sentry, be 
aware of how the program us- 
es disk space. Although it can 
use up to several megabytes 
of disk real estate. Delete Sen- 
try tells programs such as the 
DOS Dir command and File 
Manager that the space is avail- 
able. You have to use Chkdsk 
to see the true amount of un- 
used disk space. 

Delete Sentry is pro- 
grammed to give back the 
space It's using if this sudden- 
ly becomes necessary. If one 
of your other programs cre- 
ates some huge data files that 
demand the space, Delete Sen- 
try gives it up by physically de- 
leting the files it's been hold- 
ing, starting with the oldest. 
The freed clusters are then 
overwritten with the new data, 
making a recovery of the orig- 
inal file impossible. 

Delete Sentry provides a ter- 
rific insurance policy against 
accidental deletion of impor- 
tant files, but be careful not to 
rely too heavily on this protec- 
tion, especially if your system 
is chronically low on disk 
space. The best procedure to 
follow is to make regular back- 
ups of important files. That 
way, you can restore those 
filesif Delete Sentry can't. G 



52 COMPUTE OCTOBER 1993 



The 

Beloro voii sink a [M'litiv into \1S-D0S 6. 
consider a better way to maximize the 
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^ hat s more, its jrol utilities vou don't iret 
with MS-DOS. Such as the lull-screen Proirram 
Scheduler and the Integrated E Editor. Full 
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High-speed 
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PROGRAMMING POWER 



Tom Campbell 



CONVENTIONAL 
WISDOM? 



I found answers 

that defy 

conventional 

wisdom— 

and outers tliat 

suppoil iL 



54 



This month, I decided to test 
some of tiie conventional wis- 
dom about BASIC compilers 
and interpreters: that compil- 
ers are faster than interpret- 
ers, that floating-point compu- 
tations are faster than integer, 
and that Windows slows eve- 
rything down. 

A compiler takes the input 
language (BASIC, in this 
case) and converts it to an 
equivalent machine code rep- 
resentation so that it can he 
run directly on the target proc- 
essor (the 386, 286, or what- 
ever CPU runs your machine). 
A compiler needs to run only 
once, because it creates an 
executable file. Unless the man- 
ufacturer says otherwise (and 
no major compiler company 
does), you're licensed to sell 
or give the executable to any- 
one you want essentially with- 
out restriction. 

Interpreters, on the other 
hand, don't create executa- 
bles. An interpreter consumes 
as much of the program as it 
can and runs that portion, 
then eats as much of the next 
part of the program as it can. 
You always need an interpret- 
er as a host environment— as 
well as the operating system — 
to run an interpreted program. 
Normally you're not allowed to 
distribute or sell your interpret- 
ed program unless the custom- 
er already owns the interpret- 
er or you sell a copy of the 
interpreter along with your pro- 
gram. That's not always the 
case, though. Sometimes 
you're given licensing rights to 
a special version of the inter- 
preter called a runtime version 
that can only, in accordance 
with its name, run programs. 
It can't let the user change 
them. 

The advantages of a com- 
piler seem obvious. So why 
bother with interpreters at all? 

COMPUTE OCTOBER 1993 



Compiler 


Integer 


Floating-Point 


Visual Basic for Windows 2.0 


2.03 


41.58 


PowerBASIC (complied) 


0.22 


70.52 


QBASIC 


3.36 


71.89 


QuickBASIC 4.5 (interactive) 


1,49 


66.50 


QuickBASIC 4.5 (compiled) 


0.16 


79.65 



Because compilers normally 
make you wait awhile each 
time you run a program while 
it's compiled and linked, 
whereas interpreters usually 
omit those steps — just load 
and go. What If you wanted to 
write a compiler for both the 
Macintosh and the PC? One 
way to do this would be to 
"compile" to a chip that 
doesn't exist — an idealized hy- 
brid between the Mac and 
the PC, Then write a tiny pro- 
gram that converts — inter- 
prets, actually — this mythical 
machine code to executable 
statements for the target proc- 
essor. Now, what do you 
have — a compiler or an inter- 
preter'' Microsoft calls this a 
compiler. It's taken an ap- 
proach very like the one I )ust 
described (called a p-code 
machine for historical rea- 
sons) on Visual Basic for Win- 
dows, Word Basic, Access Ba- 
sic, and other dialects, start- 
ing with Quick- BASIC. As 
you might imagine, it's not 
intrinsically as efficient as di- 
rect compilation. But life isn't 
that simple. For example, float- 
ing-point code is notoriously 
inefficient on PCs without a 
math coprocessor — so ineffi- 
cient that compiled floating- 
point code could be slower 
than well-written interpreted 
floating-point code, right? 
Well . . . Right. Sometimes. 

The conventional wisdom 
has it, for example, that Visu- 
al Basic is slower than com- 
piled BASIC, but that it's not 
terribly important except in 
the case of situations such as 
tight loops; the overhead of 
Windows is where most of the 
extra time is consumed. DOS 



compilers are faster and cre- 
ate smaller code, or so it 
goes, but they don't offer all 
the advantages of Windows, 
I ran a program similar to 
this one (it differed slightly for 
each dialect) in which an emp- 
ty FOR loop using integer 
counters ran 500,000 times 
and then a similar loop using 
BASIC floating-point counters 
ran. 

Dim iCojntI, ICount2 As Integer 
Dim dCDuntI, [JCount2 As Double 
1 = Timer 
For iCountI = 1 To 1D0D 

For iCojnt2 = 1 To 500 

Next ICQunt2 
Next iCountl 

PRINT "Integer Loop count to 
500,000 in seconds: " + 
StrS(Timer - 1) 
I = Timer 
FordCountl =1 To 1000 

For dCount2 = 1 To 500 

Next dCaunt2 
Next dCountI 

PRINT "Doutile loop count to 
500,000 in seconds: " + 
Str$(Timer - 1) 

See the table above. Results 
will vary, of course, because 
my machine configuration {25- 
MHz 486SX} is probably differ- 
ent from yours. 

What's most interesting is 
that Visual Basic for Windows 
2.0 has such outstanding re- 
sults on floating-point compu- 
tations. It's much faster than 
even my Microsoft C version 
under DOS. Likewise, Quick- 
BASIC 4.5's interactive ver- 
sion, which uses the p-code 
method, somehow races past 
both its own compiled version 
and PowerBASIC's estimable 
code generator. D 



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Circie Reader Service Number 165 

©1993 Novoirade Internatrollfl^^MnEjrrglil! reserved. EA*Kids, Electronic Arts, Story Painting aitd Paintbox Pals are trademarks of Electronic Arts. 
IBM, Haciniosii and 3D0 are registered trademarks of International Business Machines Corp., AfpU Computer, Inc. and The 3D0 Cornp^ny respectively. 



TIPS & TOOLS 



Edited by Richard C. Leinecker 



Specializing Notepad 

and making 

peace lietween PFS 

First Cfioioe and 

Micrasoft Works for 

Windows 



Windows Editing 

In a recent issue ("25 Top Win- 
dows Tips," April 1993) there 
is a Windows tip showing how 
to make a Recorder macro to 
load often-used text files. 
That's kind of complicated for 
me, so I found an easier way. 

Start by selecting Notepad 
in the Program Manager. Pull 
down the File menu, select 
Copy, and make a copy of 
Notepad. Select the new Note- 
pad in the Program [Manager. 
Pull down the File menu and 
choose Properties. 

Change the description to 
represent the file that's going 
to be edited. It might be some- 
thing like AUTOEXEC or 
MY_TODO, Go to the Com- 
mand Line box and add the 
path and filename that you 
want to load into Notepad. 

Now you have an icon in 
the Program Manager that 
will automatically load a text 
file into Notepad. 

RYAN WARNER 
REVERE. MN 

PFS Cleanup 

I needed to transfer my PFS 
First Choice database files to 
Works, but even after I saved 
them as ASCII files. Works 
wouldn't load them m. 

The problem is that PFS's 
ASCII files have quotation 
marks around fields and the 
fields are separated by com- 
mas. I wrote a simple BASIC 
program that removes the quo- 
tation marks and replaces 
commas with tabs. The pro- 
gram is called CLEANPFS- 
.BAS. In the program replace 
the word infile with the name 
of the PFS First Choice file to 
be cleaned and the word out- 
file with the filename of the 
new file that will contain the 
cleaned text. 



OPENinlile FOR INPUT AS #1 
OPEN outlile FOR OUTPUT AS #2 
00 WHILE NOT E0F(1) 
CHAR$ = INPUTS(1,#1) 
IF CHARS = CHR$(34) THEN 

58 COMPUTE OCTOBER 1993 



CHARS = "" 
IF CHARS = CHR$(44) THEN 

CHARS = CHRS(9) 
PRINT #2,CHARS; 
LOOP 

PRINT#2,CHRS(9) 
CLOSE 

Open the outfile in the Works 
word processor, select the 
whole document, and then 
copy it into the Clipboard. If 
you've set up your fields in 
the database form in the 
same order, just paste from 
the Clipboard. Every block of 
text separated by the tabs 
falls neatly into each field. 

CLARK HARPER 
WINSTON-SALEM. NC 

Easier Forms 

I'd like to share a trick v/ith 
WordPerfect users who want 
to create forms with under- 
lines extending to the right 
margin. At the beginning of 
the document, press Shift-F8 
to access the Format menu. 
Select Other (option 4) and Un- 
derline Spaces/Tabs (option 
7). Change Underline Tabs to 
Yes. (You can change the 
defaults if you do this often.) 
When an underline is de- 
sired, place the cursor where 
you want it to begin and 
press F8. Now press Alt-F6 to 
flush right. This will draw an un- 
derline extending from the cur- 
sor to the right margin even if 
the nght margin or font size is 
changed. And all the under- 
lines drawn this way will line 
up at the right margin. 

CAROLYN WESTON-RICE 

MUNCIE, IN 

Professional Batch Menus 

With reference to easy DOS 
menus ("Tips & Tools," April 
1993). Mr. Henry's technique 
becomes significantly more el- 
egant with a minor modifica- 
tion. Rather than include the 
text of the menu in the menu 
batch file itself, create a sep- 
arate text file and display it 



via the batch file. Here's a 
batch file I created called 
fvlENU.BAT that displays a 
text file called MENU.TXT 

C: 

CD\ 

CLS 

TYPE MENU.TXT 

I added the lines C: and CD \ 
so that the menu can be 
called from any drive or direc- 
tory on the system. 

MARSHALL G. EMM 
AURORA. CO 

We've Got Your Number 

I get letters from readers ask- 
ing why we require a Social Se- 
curity number with the tips we 
receive. The answer is that 
the IRS likes to know who is re- 
ceiving money from us. 

RICHARD C LEINECKER 
REIDSVILLE, NC 

Better Diskless Batch Files 

in your September 1992 issue 
you printed a tip about how to 
create diskless batch files. 
You can make the tip a little 
safer to use by changing cer- 
tain lines. Here is the original. 

OOSKEY DA=ECHO Y DEL A:*.* 
OOSKEY 0B=ECHO Y DEL B:*.* 

I changed it as follows. 

OOSKEY OA=DEL A:*.* 
OOSKEY OB=DEL B:*.* 

With these changes in place, 
you'll be prompted for confir- 
mation before the deletes 
take place. 

LINHDIEU H. DAO 
SAN DIEGO. CA 

Recording Computer Boots 

Recently, I suspected that 
someone was using my work 
PC after I went home for the 
day, but I had no proof. To 
track the suspected intruder, 
I wrote BOOTTIME.BAT 
which automatically records 



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Circle Reader Service Number 157 



TIPS & TOOIS 



A bener menu 

program and 

two hot computer 

security tips 



60 



the date and time of every 
boot sequence. 

I call BOOTTIME, BAT from 
my AUTOEXEC.BAT file, but 
you could simply irisert the 
lines into your AUTOEXEC- 
.BAT file if you don t want to 
use a separate batch file. 
(This batch file will not work 
with 4DOS.) 

©ECHO OFF 

ECHO SET CURRDATE=%%3 %%4 

> CURRENT.BAT 

ECHO. IDATE> CURRENT2.BAT 
CALL CURRENT2 
ECHO SET CURRT1ME=%%3 > 

CURRENT BAT 

ECHO. ITIIVIE> CURRENT2.BAT 
CALL CURRENT2 
IF EXIST L0GTRA1L.TXT ATTRIB 

-ti LOGTRAIL.TXT 
ECHO %CURRDATE% 

%CURRTIIVIE%»LOGTRAIL.TXT 
REM AHRIB +h LOGTRAIL.TXT 
SET CURRDATE= 
SET Cl)RRTIIVIE= 
REM DEL CURRENT7.BAT 

After writing and installing 
BOOTTIf\/IE.BAT on my sys- 
tem, I knew the time of intru- 
sion to be about 6:30 p.m. eve- 
ry other weekday. By staying 
late at work for a coupfe of 
days, I managed to observe 
a coworker copying data files 
tronn my PC. He was speech- 
less when I confronted him 
with the exact dates and 
times of his burglaries. 

SCOTT SUMNER 
CANTON. Ml 



Intruder Alerts 

We have several employees 
in our office who come in af- 
ter hours. They bring their chil- 
dren and let them play on the 
computers. I never nninded un- 
til I came in one day and 
found my Windows icons com- 
pletely reorganized. 

Since then I've devised an 
intruder alert and called it 
from my AUTOEXEC.BAT file. 
It's written in BASIC and ex- 
pects you to have QBASIC in 
your path. It should run just 

COMPUTE OCTOBER 1993 



fine with BASICA, too. When 
the intruder alert runs, it tells 
you to stand by for security 
clearance and beeps ten 
times. If you press the 1 key 
during this time, it exits, and 
you can get to work. Other- 
wise, it goes into an alarm, se- 
quence where a siren sounds 
through the speaker. 

If you have QBASIC, run 
the program from your AU- 
TOEXEC.BAT file with a line 
like this: QBASIC /RUN 
C:\DOS\ALARM.BAS. 

100 FOR X = 1 TO 12: PRINT : 

NEXTX 
110 PRINT "STAND BY FOR 

SECURITY CLEARAHCE" 
120F0RX = 1T0 12: PRINT: 

NEXTX 

130 PLAY "MN L8 03 T75" 
140FORX = 1T0 10 
150 PLAY "C4" 
160 A$ = INKEY$ 
170 IF A$<> "1" GOTO 190 
180 SYSTEM 
190 NEXT X 
200 SCREEN 1 
210 COLOR 4, 15, 15 
2Z0FORX = 1 TO 11: PRINT: 

NEXTX 
230 PRINT "INTRUDER ALERT" 
240 PRINT : PRINT 
250 PRINT "Unauthorized Operator 

Detected" 
260FQRX = 1 TO 11: PRINT: 

NEXTX 
270 FOR X = 440 TO 1000 STEP 

10: SOUND X, .5: NEXTX: GOTO 

270 

This isn't a foolproof security 
system. But it's good enough 
for unwanted users who don't 
know much and are easily 
scared off. If you don't press 
the 1 key soon enough and 
the intruder alert is sounded, 
all you have to do to exit is 
press Ctrl-Break. 

REBECCA LIBBY 
FORT SMITH. AR 

Don't Format 

If you've ever caught yourself 
with the prompt WARNING. 
ALL DATA ON NON-REMOV- 



ABLE DISK DRIVE C: WILL 
BE LOSTI. you know how 
easy it is to type format c: by 
mistake instead of format b:. 
And if others use your comput- 
er and you're not sure of their 
skills, that compounds the dan- 
ger of accidentally formatting 
your hard drive. 

Here's a batch file that I cre- 
ated and put in my DOS direc- 
tory. I named it FORf^ATBAT 
and renamed the FORf^AT- 
.COM program to FORfVlAT!- 
.COfvl. It prevents anyone 
from formatting any drives oth- 
er than A and B. If you ever re- 
ally want to format your hard 
drive, all you have to do is 
use the command Format! at 
the command line instead of 
the usual Format command. 

©ECHO OFF 

IF"%1"="" GOTO USAGE 
IF"%1"=="/?"G0T0 USAGE 
FOR %%A IN (A; a: B: b:) DO IF 

"%%A"=="%r' GOTO 

DOFORMAT 
ECHO " 
ECHO " 
ECHO You may not lormat a fixed 

disk! 
ECHO " 
ECHO " 
:USAGE 
FORMAT! /? 
GOTO END 
:D0F0RIV1AT 
FORMAT! %1 %2 %3 %4 %5 %6 

%7 %8 %9 
:END 

JAMES KAO 
COACHELLA, CA 



If you have an interesting tip 
that you thinl< would help oth- 
er PC users, send it along 
with your name, address, and 
Social Security number to 
COMPUTE'S Tips & Tools, 
324 West Wendover Avenue, 
Suite 200, Greensboro. North 
Carolina 27408. For each tip 
we publish, well pay you $25- 
$50. All tips submitted be- 
come the property of General 
Media International. 



^ 



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o 



» 



J? 



^^:^ 





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^--i;-^ " - 


rdm ■''' 


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'■i^O B 


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Circle Reader Service Numtjer 143 




FLIGHT ASSIGNMENT: A TP 

A great flying simula tion for a 

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HARDWARE CLINIC 



Mark Minasi 



DOS 6'S SUBMENU 
command can 

make it easier for 
severai people 

to share tlie same 
computer. 



DOS 6's 
MUmCONFIG, 
PART 4 

This month, I'll conclude my dis- 
cussion of MultiConfig's fea- 
tures. For the benefit of those 
just tuning in, fvlultiConfig is per- 
haps the best new feature of 
DOS 6. It lets you combine a 
number of CONFIG.SYS/AU- 
TOEXEC.BAT pairs into a sin- 
gle CONFIG.SYSand AUTOEX- 
EC.BAT. You can then choose 
which configuration you wish 
to boot with from a menu 
that's displayed at boot time. 
Check out the June, August, 
and September "Hardware 
Clinic" columns for more 
information. 

This month, we'll look at 
MultiConfig's SUBfvlENU com- 
mand, which can be especial- 
ly helpful when you have more 
than one person using the 
same computer. 



What's a Submenu? 

We're used to working with 
menu systems under the DOS 
Shell, Windows programs, 
and OS/2 applications; those 
menu systems are typically 
two-level menu systems — se- 
lect an option, and more 
suboptions appear. 

For example, I'm looking 
right now at the menu on a 
Windows program. Ami Pro. 
The Ami Pro menu offers the 
options File, Edit, View, Text, 
Style, Page, Frame, Tools, Win- 
dow, and Help, That's the top- 
level menu. However, if I 
click the mouse on. say, the 
Window menu item, then I get 
another menu below that, a 
kind of submenu that offers 
the options New window. 
Tile, and Cascade. 

MultiConfig lets you add a 
second level of menus to your 
MS-DOS Startup Menu using 
the SUBMENU command. For 
instance, recall the Normal-ver- 
sus-lnterlnk example that I've 

64 COMPUTE OCTOBER 1993 



used during the previous 
months. Interink can be used 
in either server or client mode. 
You could put together a 
menu with three options on it: 
Normal, lnterlnk-Ser\/er, and In- 
terink-Client. Or you could 
have a top-level menu that of- 
fered just Normal and Interink 
options, and then if you chose 
Interink, you'd get a second- 
level menu that offered either 
Client or Server. Note that put- 
ting a submenu on Interink 
doesn't force you to put a sub- 
menu on the other menu op- 
tions, such as Normal. 

Using Submenus 

The SUBMENU command in 
MultiConfig looks like this, 

SUBMENU MENUBLOCK.Menutext 

Here, MENUBLOCK is the 
name of a block — a section of 
CONFIG, SYS with that name 
at the top enclosed in square 
brackets. Menutext is the text 
that you want displayed on 
the Startup Menu. You then 
create a block called 
[MENUBLOCK] that contains 
menu commands, just like the 
original block called [MENU]. 
When we last looked at the 
Normal/lnterink example, the 
CONFIG.SYS looked like this, 

[MENU] 

MENUITEM NORMAL.Standaril 

setup 
MENUITEM INTERLNK.Setup with 

Interink driver 
MENUOEFAULT N0RIVIAL,2 

[SHARED] 

FILES^eO 

BUFFERS=30 

STACKS=9,25B 

DEVICE=C:\DOS\HIMEM.SYS 

DOS^HIGH 

[NORiVJAU 
INCLUDE SHARED 

[INTERLNK] 

INCLUDE SHARED 

DEV1CE=C:\D0S\INTERLNK.EXE 



To make the Interink option 
not a configuration, but a sub- 
menu, I'll change MENUITEM 
INTERLNK.Setup with Interink 
driver to SUBMENU IN- 
TERLNK.Setup with Interink 
driver. 

Once I do that, however, 
MultiConfig will expect the [IN- 
TERLNK] block to contain 
menu commands, not CON- 
FIG.SYS commands. So the 
new [INTERLNK] block 
should contain a menu for 
the Interink server and client 
commands. That menu will 
have new menu items, can 
contain menu defaults, can in- 
clude new colors, and can 
even contain more sub- 
menus. 

The new [INTERLNK] 
block will be fairly simple to 
build, as you see here. 

[INTERLNK] 

MENUITEM SERVER, Load Interink 

as server 
MENUITEM CLIENT.Load Interink 

as client 

Then I'll have to build two 
new blocks, the [SERVER] 
and [CLIENT] blocks. They'll 
actually contain the same 
text in the CONFIG.SYS, but 
they'll look different in the AU- 
TOEXEC.BAT These new 
blocks will look like this. 

[CLIENT] 

INCLUDE SHARED 

DEVfCE=C:\DOS\INTERLNK.EXE 

[SERVER] 

INCLUDE SHARED 

DEVICE=C:\DOS\INTERLNK.EXE 

The reason why I even both- 
ered with two different config- 
urations is that the com- 
mands in the AUTOEX- 
EC.BAT have to be different 
in this situation. A piece of the 
AUTOEXEC.BAT might look 
like the following. 

IF %CONFIG%==CLIENT GOTO 
CLIENT 



IF %CDNF1G%==SERVER GOTO 
SERVER 

:CLIENT 
PROMPT 5P£G 
PATH C:\DOS 
INTERLNK 
GOTO END 
iSERUER 

C:\DOS\iNTERSVR 
GOTO END 
:END 

In the server configuration, 
there's no need to set 
PROMPT and PATH, as the 
server computer just sits 
there with an Interink status re- 
port on the screen; you can't 
get a DOS prompt or execute 
programs anyway. Put the 
whole CONFIG.SYS together, 
and it looks like this. 

[MENU] 

MENUITEIVI NORMAL^Standard 

setup 
SUBMENU INTERLNK,Setup with 

Interink driver 
MENUDEFAULT N0RIVIAL,2 

[SHARED] 

FILES=60 

BUFFERS=3D 

STACKS=9,256 

DEVICE=C:\DOS\HIMEIVI.SYS 

DOS=HIGH 

[NORMAL] 
INCLUDE SHARED 

[INTERLNK] 

MENUITEM SERVER, Load Interink 

as server 
MENUITEM CLIENT,Load Interink 

as client 

[CLIENT] 

INCLUDE SHARED 

DEVICE=C:\DOSMNTERLNK.EXE 

[SERVER] 

INCLUDE SHARED 

DEVICE=C:\DOSMNTERLNK.EXE 

In case it hasn't been made 
clear yet, submenus don't 
change anything about the 
way that you write your AU- 



TOEXEC.BAT. The only way 
that submenus (or the main 
menu, for that matter) can af- 
fect AUTOEXEC.BAT is 
through communicating the 
value of the %CONFIG% envi- 
ronment variable. 

Where could you use sub- 
menus? A lot of COMPUTE 
readers own PCs that are 
shared by several people. For 
example, some companies 
have a pool of laptop comput- 
ers that people borrow tempo- 
rarily from the pool prior to go- 
ing on a business trip. One of 
the biggest gripes that the peo- 
ple who use those computers 
make is that when they get the 
laptop back after someone 
else has used it, the configura- 
tion has been all messed up, 

in many private homes, 
there's only one computer 
shared by Mom, Dad, and Jun- 
ior, and they all want to be 
able to keep their own config- 
urations separate and distinct. 
Public access computers, 
such as the ones that are start- 
ing to appear in public librar- 
ies, may need to serve as con- 
necting points to databases of 
very different types, requiring 
different access methods. 

MultiConfig can help to 
solve these three problems 
with its single-level menu. In 
the home example. Mom, 
Dad, and Junior could each 
have a menu item, but with sub- 
menus, it's possible for Mom 
to have 3 of her own configura- 
tions, Dad to have a couple, 
and Junior to keep separate 
the 14 different configurations 
he needs to run all his games. 

And an arrangement like 
this actually provides a use for 
the MENUCOLOR command 
that I mentioned in August. 
One way to be sure that you ha- 
ven't accidentally activated 
someone else's menu is to col- 
or each menu differently. This 
is more useful than it would 
seem at first glance. Imagine 
that Dad sits down to use the 
PC and he reboots and (out of 



habit) presses 2, then 1, and 
then Enter, as that combination 
always gets him to the config- 
uration he typically uses. In- 
stead of ending up in Quicken, 
however, he quickly finds him- 
self (or, rather, finds his cursor) 
being chased by the minions 
of the ravenous bug-blatter 
beast of Traal. What's hap- 
pened to Dad, of course, is 
that he's accidentally gotten in- 
to Junior's menu. But if the 
screen had turned red when 
he got to Junior's submenu, he 
would've noticed it (Dad uses 
a menu with a sedate gray 
background) and rebooted 
straight off. 

There's more to MultiCon- 
fig — Clean Boot, Interactive 
Boot, and Num Lock control, 
for example — but that stuff's 
easy to pick up from the man- 
ual. In this series, I've tried to 
get you started with the most 
important MultiConfig com- 
mands. Now you can go forth 
and create The CONFIG.SYS 
from Hell. 

I try to answer all the calls 
and letters I get; sorry I've fall- 
en a trifle behind recently. Let 
me make a request if you feel 
like contacting me this 
month. Virtually all of you 
have expressed happiness 
with this column and my 
books, but tell me more. 1 
have a pile of things that I'm 
working on now, but 1 don't 
know if they're the kind of 
things that you want to read 
about. Tell me what you'd like 
to see in the column, and I'll 
do my best to respond. 

Speak Up! 

Do you have a tough hardware 
problem you'd like Mark to tack- 
le? Let him know about it by 
calling (900) 884-8681, exten- 
sion 7010202 (sponsored by 
Pure Entertainment, P.O. Box 
186, Hollywood, California 
90078). The call will cost 95 
cents per minute, you must be 
18 or older, and you must use 
a touch-tone phone, D 

OCTOBER 1993 COMPUTE 



65 



Cyril Northcote Parkinson 
gave us a mantra for {he 
modern day: "Work ex- 
pands to fit the avaiiabie 
tinne." Tfiat same principle holds 
equally true for tfie innards of our 
computers: Data will expand to fill 
every nook and cranny of a hard 
disk, no matter how many precau- 
tions you take. 

Record a few seconds of 16-bil 
audio, update a customer database, 
or make an editable copy of a novel, 
and soon that expanse of free 
megabytes becomes a claustropho- 
bic region to be protected at any 
cost. Data grows to fit the space, a 
truism just as certain as death and 
taxes. 

Fortunately, since the infancy of 
computer technology and information 
science, mathematicians and com- 
puter scientists have been diligently 
battling this problem. In the late 
1940s Claude Shannon began the 
study of data compression as he 
explored the entropy, or information 
richness, of a quantity of data. 
Mathematically speaking, 
the higher the entropy of a 
data file is, the more informa- 
tion will be in that file. 
Shannon explored ways in 
which to store data as effi- 
ciently as possible, to get 
the most information into a 
few bits. 

Since that time, the 
abstract gyrations of com- 
pression schemes have 
found their way into nearly 
every aspect of daily com- 
puting. Load a new program 



or game onto your hard disk, and you 
must run an installation program that 
decompresses the information held 
on the floppy disks. Download a utili- 
ty or file from a BBS, and chances 
are that you must extract the file with 
PKUNZIP or some other decompres- 
sion program. And now, in today's 
world of monster data files and multi- 
media information, data compression 
is even being factored into the most 
basic levels of file storage formats. 

Gospel Truth 

The most basic gospel of any data 
compression scheme is to get more 
into less space. To shrink data, a 
program must examine the data and 
then apply a compression algorithm 
to the most basic information — the 
bits and bytes that make up the data. 
This algorithm shrinks the size of a 
data file by combing out any redun- 
dancy in the information, thus making 
the output a more concise, informa- 
tion-ricti piece of data. 

Compression techniques can vary 
widely, and the details of the com- 

DATA 

UNDER 

PRESSURE 

NO MATTER HOW MUCH 
STORAGE SPACE YOU HAVE, 

YOU NEED MORE. 
COMPRESSION CAN HELP. 



presston algorithms vary from differ- 
ent mathematical approaches to 
entirety different schemes for wildly 
different data types. For example, a 
spreadsheet and a realtime video file 
will be best served by different com- 
pression techniques. While some 
techniques are specialized, there are 
generic compression algorithms that 
work at the most basic data level, 
oblivious to whether the data is a text 
file or a scanned image of Mona Lisa. 
The simplest form of data com- 
pression is called run length encod- 
ing (RLE). The PCX data format 
employs RLE in its basic data format. 
RLE compresses data by eliminating 
redundancy. Imagine a single frame 
of Disney's Snow White, for example. 
The image is made up of large fields 
of simple colors — blue for her dress 
and red for the nose of Sneezy, the 
dwarf, if we cut this picture up into 
horizontal strips, we can see that the 
picture consists of a series of color 
areas. Imagine these to be data 
bytes, and we can easily compress 
the image. If the strip showing Snow 
White's dress is a field of 
blue, then the file storing the 
image can represent it as a 
series of bytes signifying 
blue. But for greater efficien- 
cy, we can replace the 
series of blue bytes with a 
pair of bytes, one indicating 
blue and the other indicating 
how many blue bytes are in 
the row. In this way, data can 
be much more efficiently 
stored. 

RLE, however, is not the 
best method for compress- 



BY PAUL C. SCHUYTEMA 



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ing a moving video file 
or a photorealistic 
image. The constant 
variations of hue and 
luminosity make RLE 
actually less efficient 
than storing this type of 
data normally. What is 
needed is another form 
of compression better 
suited for this type of 
visual data. 

Generally, data com- 
pression comes in two 
flavors, "lossy" and 
"lossless," Lossy com- 
pression is a data com- 
pression scheme that 
represents a near match of the data, 
not the exact data. In a video image, 
for example, the human eye won't 
notice if a few pixels are removed or 
ten levels of blue are cut to eight, The 
JPEG (for still images) and MPEG (for 
video images) standards are two 
types of lossy data compression that 
are specifically designed to handle 
visual image files. Lossless compres- 
sion is a data compression scheme 
that compresses and represents the 
data exactly. Information such as a 
spreadsheet or a haiku poem would 
become useless if any of the informa- 
tion was omitted or substituted. 
Lossless compression is the type of 
compression offered by DoubleSpace 
(which comes with DOS 6), Stacker, 
and SuperStor Pro. 

As a hard disk fills to capacity, it's 
tempting to turn to one of these prod- 
ucts for some much-needed disk real 
estate. But how do they work? Are 
they safe? Do they change the way 
we use our computers? 
These are some topics 
we will explore in order 
to arm ourselves with 
the information neces- 
sary to make an intelli- 
gent choice whether or 
not to compress. 



Compression Facts and Figures 

Whole-Disk Compression Performance (170MB Hard Drive*) 
Compression Total Storage Space Used Free Space 

None 166,276K 89,160K 

Stacker 317,656K 93,360K 

SuperStor Pro 315,588K 91,706K 

DoubleSpace 298,334K 88.1 02K 

' Disk is set up with a 5104K Windows permanent swap file. 



77,540K 
224,296K 
224,8B2K 
210,232K 



Lempel-Ziv approach offer different 
interfaces and utilities, on the whole, 
the two most important factors, the 
compression ratio and the perfor- 
mance, are remarkably similar. 

When one of these generic com- 
pression programs is installed on a 
hard drive, it will create two drives. 
One will operate the same as an 
uncompressed hard drive, but it will 
have approximately double the size of 
the original drive (I expanded a 
170MB hard drive into approximately 
310MB, not including a 5MB perma- 
nent swap file for Windows). The other 
drive will contain information important 
for the compression program, as well 
as a single file which physically con- 
tains all of the hard disk's files, in 
compressed form. 

The compression program's device 
driver is loaded into memory during 
the boot-up process, and it intercepts 
the data going to or from the hard 
disk. As the data streams into a buffer, 



Profit Without Loss 

DoubleSpace. Stacker, 
and SuperStor Pro all 
use variations of the 
same generic lossless 
compression algorithm 
called Lempel-Ziv. The 
algorithm is named for 
its creators, Abraham 
Lempel and Jacob Ziv, 
who introduced the al- 
gorithm in a paper enti- 
tled "A Universal Al- 
gorithm for Sequential 
Data Compression" in 
1977, While the three 
implementations of the 

68 COMPUTE OCTOBER 1993 



Performance Comparison 

Test A: copying a 1183K directory from an uncompressed 
floppy to a compressed hard disk (directory is a mixture of exe- 
cutable and data files) 



Test B; copying a 1183K directory from a compressed hard 
disk to an uncompressed floppy (directory is a mixture of exe- 
cutable and data files) 

Test C: opening a 7QK Ami Pro 3.0 file from compressed hard 
disk (file is a mixture of text, tables, and simple graphics) 



Time measured in seconds 

Compression Test A Test B Test C 

None 95 69 8 

Stacker 74 83 6 

SuperStor Pro 106 98 8 

DoubleSpace 101 98 11 



the Lempel-Ziv algorithm 
scans the data in a "slid- 
ing window," sending off 
unique sections of data 
but looking for repeated 
patterns. When a redun- 
dant piece of data is 
encountered, an offset 
pointer is sent instead of 
the data proper. This 
pointer points to the first 
instance of that data, in 
this way, the Lempel-Ziv 
algorithm is a dictionary- 
based compression sys- 
tem, creating a table of 
repeating data patterns 
and substituting a pointer 
to the data's location in the dictionary, 
rather than the actual data. By trim- 
ming out the redundancy at the binary 
level, Lempel-Ziv can consistently 
offer about a 2 : 1 compression ratio. 

However, the Lempel-Ziv algorithm 
used in today's generic compression 
programs is sophisticated enough to 
create an Integrated dictionary — one 
that is contained within the com- 
pressed file. Because of this, the com- 
pression and decompression routines 
are executed faster, and there is no 
need for a separate dictionary file. The 
information in a Lempel-Ziv com- 
pressed file consists of a stream of 
actual data and pointers (set off by a 
code to let the decompression routine 
know that the information following is a 
pointer and not another instance of 
data), in which the pointers indicate 
an offset location in the file where the 
"real" instance of the data lives. 

All of this data manipulation oper- 
ates transparently to the user. It works 
directly with the read 
and write calls to the 
hard disk. On the sur- 
face, everything oper- 
ates normally, with the 
exception that the 
capacity of the hard disk 
is doubled. If you were 
to examine the amount 
of compression taking 
place on a per-file basis, 
there would be much 
more variation, Executa- 
ble files are the least 
compressible, while 
database files can easily 
see compression ratios 
as great as 7 : 1. 



Ready to Commit 

By committing to a pro- 
gram that compresses 
an entire drive, do users 
set themselves up for 
any unnatural risks? 
Possibly, But there are 



two sides to the story (and consider- 
able middle ground). 

On the paranoid side, compress- 
ing a disk using Lempel-Ziv means 
putting your data at risk. Since 
Lempel-Ziv builds a dictionary on the 
fly from information contained in the 
compressed file, one wrong byte 
could create a cascade of disaster. 
Since the algorithm relies on the 
absolute accuracy of everything it 
has read to build the file, garbled 
information could lead to any number 
of mistakes, like data's being inter- 
preted as a pointer or a pointer's 
pointing to a wrong instance of data, 
resulting in the retrieval of irrelevant 
data. Fortunately, when an entire 
disk is compressed, it's not treated 
as a single file, though, technically, it 
is a single file. The Lempel-Ziv algo- 
rithm looks at the disk file in sectors 
and builds a fresh dictionary for 
each unit of data read Into the algo- 
rithm's buffer (generally 2048 bytes), 
which might contain only parts of a 
file or might contain several small 
files. If some data is misread, only 



that sector's data will be lost. 

On the other side of the coin, since 
data is compressed into much less 
physical space on the disk, the hard 
disk itself has to do less work to 
access a file, so the probability of an 
error's occurring is less than when 
accessing an uncompressed file. 

The middle road, though, is truly 
the most sensible approach to take. 
Since the compression algorithm is 
performing an extra operation on your 
data, backing up regularly is essential 
(backup programs such as Central 
Point Backup work fine with com- 
pressed disks; in fact. Central Point's 
backup compression algorithm is 
licensed from Stac Electronics). With 
regular backups, it's safe to say that 
the inherent risks of whole-disk com- 
pression are minimized such that the 
benefits far outweigh any dangers. 

The Turn of the Screw 

So how do Stacker, SuperStor Pro, and 
DoubleSpace measure up? Compres- 
sionwise, it's a tossup (see accompa- 
nying table}, with differences being 



very minor indeed. They all perform at 
roughly the same level, slowing your 
computer down a bit (with the excep- 
tion of Stacker), but hardly enough to 
complain about. Each supports 
Windows' permanent swap file (plac- 
ing it in the uncompressed drive), and 
each boasts Windows interfaces, 
though each interface is passable at 
best. In short, the similarities far out- 
weigh the differences, but there are a 
few points worth noting. 

Stacker 3.0 and 3.T 

Stacker 3.1 is essentially the same 
product as 3.0, but it's configured 
specially for DOS 6, replacing 
Microsoft's DoubleSpace and loading 
the needed drivers as part of the DOS 
operating system and not in the CON- 
FIG.SYS file. Also, 3.1 allows a user 
who has already set up a Double- 
Space drive to easily convert it to a 
Stacker drive. Other than that, there 
are no real differences between ver- 
sions 3.0 and 3.1. 

Stacker is the easiest of the three 
to set up, yet the installation takes a 



Hints 

Here are some rules of thumb to help 
you live with disk compression. 

• Be sure to back up your data 
before installing a hard disk com- 
pression product. Also, be sure to 
back up your data before you unin- 
stall the compressed drive, since 
chances of errors are magnified as 
the program decompresses mega- 
byte upon megabyte of data. 

• If you're using DOS 6, either with 
DoubleSpace or with any other com- 
pression product, turn off SMART- 
Drive's lazy write feature. When DOS 6 
is installed, SMARTDrive is set up so 
that it will not always v/rite data to disk 
immediately, but will wait for an oppor- 
tune moment. It's possible to lose data 
if you jusi switch off your computer. 

• If you have additional drives on 
your system, such ss a removable 
hard disk or a CD-ROM drive, don't 
expect the compression program to 
have the intelligence to figure it all 
out. You might have to go back and 
let your programs know the lay of the 
land. (My CD-ROM drive was 
changed from drive E to drive F dur- 
ing compression installation.) 

• Be sure to have all of your manu- 
als handy during installation. During 
each of my installations on two differ- 



ent computers (a 386 and a 486), I 
had problems. They were minor 
problems — not fatal ones— but hav- 
ing the operating manuals handy let 
me track down some of the more 
esoteric conundrums (such as losing 
my 386 enhanced driver for 
Windows). 

• Be aware that not al! games will 
work in compressed form. If you're a 
serious game player, it might be a 
good idea to make a drive partition, 
creating an uncompressed logical 
drive for your games, and compress 
only your more standard applications 
and files. 

• If you have a removable hard 
drive, compressing one of the car- 
tridges makes for an extremely sim- 
ple backup option. I used a 90MB 
removable compressed to nearly 
180MB for easy whole-disk backups. 
In Windows, I created a macro that 
drags the C drive over to my remov- 
able and copies the entire thing in 
roughly 15 minutes. 

• When you see an indication of how 
much free space is left on a disk 
assume that it's an educated guess 
rather than the actual truth, since dif- 
ferent files compress at different 
rates. In one instance, Windows' File 
Manager told me I had 229MB free, 
the compression program's utility 
informed me that I had 210I\/1B free, 



and DOS informed me that I actually 
had 234MB free. 

• Don't use a standard disk opti- 
mizer on a compressed drive. 
Chances are that it won't hurt any- 
thing, but it will see the entire com- 
pressed drive as a single file. Use an 
optimizer designed for compressed 
disks. 

• Copying a file (or moving a direc- 
tory in Windows) within a com- 
pressed disk takes longer than copy- 
ing that file to an uncompressed disk 
because the file must be decom- 
pressed and then recompressed. 

• A hard disk compression utility is a 
perfect addition to a roving laptop 
computer. Consider a utility that will 
allov/ compressed floppies to be 
used on other systems tor maximum 
efficiency. 

• A compressed file can rarely be 
compressed further. Sometimes you 
can achieve an additional percent- 
age or two of compression, but usu- 
ally a compressed file actually 
becomes larger when compressed a 
second time. For this reason, one of 
the techniques for saving space on 
an uncompressed hard drive — using 
PKZIP to compress large files and 
directories — is useless on a drive 
compressed with Stacker or one of its 
competitors. 



OCTOBER 1993 COMPUTE 69 



while to defragment and compress 
the disk (about 45 minutes to one hour 
for a 170MB hard drive). Once 
Stacker is in place, it works transpar- 
ently. 

Stacker offers a wide array of utili- 
ties, accessible at the command line 
or through Windows or DOS inter- 
faces. In Windows, the user has the 
option of seeing a graphical dash- 
board—the "Stackometer" — showing 
the compression ratio, the amount of 
free space on the hard drive, and the 
amount of fragmentation. Stacker also 
features an optimized version of 
Norton's SpeedDisk to defragment the 
compressed files. 

Stacker handles a Windows swap 
file very well, placing it in the uncom- 
pressed drive. If you want to change 
the size, though, it's slightly tricky. If 
you wish to make it smaller, you have 
to exit to DOS and change the size of 
the Stacker drive (an option which 
should be available in Windows). If 
you wish to make it larger, you have to 
exit to DOS and shrink the size of the 
Stacker drive before performing the 
operation in Windows. 

Stacker allows a user to compress 
a floppy or removable hard disk with 
Stacker Anywhere, a transparent utility 
that will allow the disk to work on a 



Compress and Back Up 

One strategy for keeping your hard 
disk clear is to compress the files 
you rarely use and archive the files 
you never use. Chili Pepper 
Software has automated this 
process with Infinite Disk. It moni- 
tors your hard disk use and leaves 
often-used files uncompressed, 
compresses the files you only 
occasionally use, and prompts you 
to archive to a floppy the files that 
you haven't accessed during a 
specified period of time. You place 
a special sticker on the floppy to 
identify it. As far as your operating 
system is concerned, the archived 
file is still on your hard disk. The 
only difference is that when you 
access that file, Infinite Disk 
prompts you to insert the floppy 
containing its archive. It v/ill be 
accessed as if it were still on your 
hard disk. There is no theoretical 
limit to the number of floppies you 
could use, so this method of hard 
disk management could yield an 
infinite hard disk, hence the name. 
The only practical limit would be 
your ability to maintain an orderly 
collection of floppies. 



system that doesn't already have 
Stacker installed. 

SuperStor Pro 

Addstor's SuperStor Pro is similar to 
Stacker in many respects, although 
installing SuperStor Pro is much more 
demanding for the user (the newest 
versions of SuperStor Pro are bundled 
with 1.01 Enhancements, making 
installation a little easier). Once the 
system is installed, you have access 
to both DOS and Windows command 
interfaces. SuperStor Pro's Windows 
utility, while not as graphically pleas- 
ing as Stacker's, allows you to perform 
more operations, such as setting up a 
floppy or removable disk. The utilities 
allow the user to see the compression 
ratios and storage savings in a num- 
ber of ways, even down to the statis- 
tics of an individual file. 

SuperStor Pro features its own disk 
optimization program, as well as an 
additional program, JPEG Workshop, 
which allows users to compress color 
and black-and-white image files using 
the JPEG standard for lossy compres- 
sion (achieving an average 20 : 1 
compression ratio). 

SuperStor Pro also allows remov- 
able media to be outfitted with 
AddStor's version of UDE (Universal 




70 COMPUTE OCTOBER 1993 




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Data Exchange}, which enables the 
disks to be fully functional on systems 
that don't have AddStor's product 
already installed. 

Addstor also plans to offer 
DoubleTools, a compression program 
which, like Stacker 3.1, will supplant 
DoubleSpace, 

DoubleSpace 

DOS 6. when purchased as an 
upgrade, is the most cost-effective 
way to double a hard disk. Double- 
Space IS a compression utility based 
on an algorithm licensed from Vertisoft 
(Stac Electronics is currently suing 
Microsoft for patent infringement: 
Microsoft first approached Stac to use 
its compression technology in DOS 6, 
but a deal could not be struck). 

DoubleSpace is not automatically 
activated when you install DOS 6; it 
must be installed separately. When 
DoubleSpace compresses a drive, it 
creates a CVF (Compressed Volume 
File), which holds the compressed 
contents of the entire disk. Double- 
Space conforms to the Microsoft 
Realtime Compression Interface 
(MRCI), which is a standard that 
Microsoft hopes will be a common 
ground for all future software and 
hardware compression schemes 
(Stacker 3.1 and Addstor's Double- 




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The least expensive alternative: 
l\/1S~DOS 6 Upgrade's DoubleSpace 



Tools conform to the MRCI standard). 

DoubleSpace offers performance 
simitar to that of Stacker and 
SuperStor Pro, but it has the advan- 
tage of being a component of the 
operating system. A drive com- 
pressed with the other products must 
maintain two copies of the CONFIG- 
.SYS file, while DoubleSpace works 
with a single instance of the file. 

A disadvantage of DoubleSpace is 
that, at the time of this writing, the 
included optimization software was 
not configured to handle the com- 
pressed disk (the CVF), so it will not 
actually perform an optimization at all. 

DoubleSpace suffers from the fact 
that it's the only one of the three prod- 
ucts that doesn't offer an uninstall fea- 
ture. To unDoubleSpace a dhve, you 
must back up the entire drive, delete 
the compressed drive, and retrieve 
the information from the backup. Also, 
if you want to move from Stacker to 
DoubleSpace, you'll want to purchase 
a $5 (plus $5 for handling) utility from 
Microsoft called The MS-DOS 6 
Stacker Conversion Kit. 

Con<lusion 

Hard disk compression utilities are a 
very exciting solution to a shrinking 
hard disk. The cost is far lower than 
that of a new hard drive, and the tech- 




naui 



nology Is advanced enough to install 
and forget. While some increased risk 
is Incurred witli disk compression, a 
prudent scheduie of backups will pro- 
tect Important data. 

Of the three programs mentioned 
above, any can be a wise and safe 
choice to double the capacity of a 
hard disk. Stacker offers the edge In 
ease of use, with effortless installation. 




Fast and powerful: Stacker 

SuperStor Pro provides the easiest 
access to removable media, In which 
the user can compress a floppy right 
from the Windows Interface. Double- 
Space offers the cost edge, as well as 



Products Under Pressure 

Remember that these are list prices. 
Many of these products are available 
at significantly lower prices either 
through their manufacturers or 
through retailers. 

SuperStor Pro 

$149.95 

DoubleTools for DoubleSpace 

$99.00 

ADDSTOR 

1040 Marsh Rd., Ste. 100 

Menio Park, CA 94025 

(800) 732-3133 

DOS 6 

$129.95 

The MS-DOS 6 Stacker 

Conversion Kit 
$5.00 

MICROSOFT 
P.O. Box 3018 
BothelLWA 98041-3018 
(800) 228-7007 



PKZIPforDOS2.04G 

$47.00 

PKWARE 

9025 N, Deerwood Dr. 

Brown Deer, Wl 53223-2437 

(414)354-8699 

Stacker 3.0 

$149,00 

Stacker 3,1 

$99.95 

Stacker Special Edition 

(only for DOS 6 users) 

$129.95 

STAC ELECTRONICS 

5993 Avenida Enclnas 

Carlsbad, CA 92008 

(800) 522-7822 

Infinite Disk 

$189.00 

CHILI PEPPER SOFTWARE 

1630 Pleasant Hill Rd.. Ste. 180-200 

Atlanta, GA 30136-7411 

(404)339-1812 



the solidity of being an integral part of 
the operating system. Alternatives 
Include Infinite Disk from Chili Pepper 
Software, which selectively compress- 
es and archives files based on fre- 



quency of access. 

Any way you go, a compressed 
disk can give you that much-needed 
breathing room: a new allotment of 
megabytes to conquer. □ 




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Finally! A communications software package 

that runs under Windows, is easy to use, 

and has enough muscle to satisfy power users. __ 

Tom Benford 



CROSSTALK FOR 
WINDOWS 2.0 



One of the best communica- 
tions packages available just 
got better. Crosstalk for Win- 
dows 2.0 is a new-generation 
product ttiat even jaded pow- 
er users will appreciate. 

The product design team 
at Digital Communications As- 
sociates has added many use- 
ful features and implemented 
a true graplnical interface in 
the program. These improve- 
ments make the new 
Crosstalk much more than an 
upgrade: It's a powerful new 
product. 

For starters, DCA made the 
program intuitive and highly 
automated. It supports a true 
point-and-shoot interface that 
makes it easy for even novice 
teiecommunicators to use. 

Ivloreover, Crosstalk's ease 
of use begins right from the 
box. To install it, all that you 
have to do is name a target 
directory for the program's 
files: the excellent installation 
program takes care of the 
rest. The first time you run the 
program, you're greeted with 
a script configuration utiiity. 
This configuration session 
polls you for information 
about your system, including 
the desired COf\^ port(s), the 
type of m,odem(s) you have in- 
stalled, and other essential in- 
formation. It uses the informa- 
tion you give it to tailor the 
program to your preferences 
and system configuration. 
You can even change the de- 
fault directory settings for sav- 
ing captured files, scripts, 
and more. 

When you run the program, 
you're presented with a ses- 
sions file menu that contains 
icon-activated scripts for cre- 
ating, invoking, or editing pre- 

74 COMPUTE OCTOBER 1993 




defined macro operating 
scripts. The default menu pro- 
vides scripts for setting up 
Crosstalk in answer mode, as 
well as setups for AT&T fvlail 
CompuServe, DCA's BBS, Del- 
phi, Dialog, Dow Jones News 
Retrieval, GEnie, Lexis/Nexis, 
MCI fvlail. NewsNet, and the 
Official Airline Guide. It also of- 
fers an easy setup for other 
hosts, as well as for PC- 
based BBSs. 

DCA did a superb job with 
the documentation for the pro- 
gram. Two extremely helpful 
manuals are included with the 
package. The first is a user's 
guide that's well written and il- 
lustrated: it details all of the 
program's features and how 
to use them. The second man- 
ual is the CASL Programmer's 
Guide: it's an extensive re- 
source for using the proprie- 
tary scripting language, 
CASL (Crosstalk Application 
Script Language; more on 
this later). 

Crosstalk also features a 
comprehensive online help 
system that's only a mouse 
click away from any level of 



the program. So, should you 
require some prompting or if 
you want some information 
about one of the software's 
many features, you don't 
have to refer to the printed 
documentation. 

This new version of 
Crosstalk has support for 18 
terminal emulations, so regard- 
less of your specific require- 
ments or terminal preferenc- 
es, you're taken care of. It 
also covers 9 different file- 
transfer protocols, with varia- 
tions of XfvlODEfvl and 
YMODEM that boost the total 
protocol selection to a hefty 
15 choices. 

Going well beyond merely 
configuring itself to your hard- 
ware, Crosstalk takes full ad- 
vantage of the data- and re- 
source-sharing features that 
Windows 3.1 provides while 
utilizing Windows' protected 
mode and memory manage- 
ment facilities. It also sup- 
ports Vi/indows' Dynamic Data 
Exchange (DDE); this means 
that you can link Crosstalk 
with other applications to ex- 



change information. 

If you're a telecommunica- 
tions power user, you'll be 
pleased that Crosstalk also 
conforms to the Windows Mul- 
tiple Document Interface 
(MDI) specification, a feature 
which permits you to have mul- 
tiple communications ses- 
sions in progress. If you have 
the hardware to support COM 
ports 1-4, the program sup- 
ports them for multiple ses- 
sions at the same time. 

You'll also appreciate 
Crosstalk's inherent data-shar- 
ing capabilities, which allow 
you to easily cut and paste in- 
formation from one session in- 
to another session. This help- 
ful feature adds tremendously 
to the program's flexibility and 
functionality. And because 
each session sports its own 
toolbar, it is quite easy for you 
to access commonly used 
functions regardless of where 
you're currently located in the 
active sessions. 

The CASL manual and the 
thick programmer's guide pro- 
vide conceptual information 
about writing Crosstalk 
scripts. It's helpful for the inex- 
perienced programmer and 
still provides ample detailed 
reference material to keep the 
sophisticated applications de- 
veloper happy. 

Remarkably similar in its 
power and command format 
to both C and Pascal, CASL 
can be used to create any 
type of script imaginable — 
from a simple log-on to online 
services such as MCI Mail or 
CompuServe, all the way up 
to extended scripts that are ca- 
pable of running fully automat- 
ed communications sessions 
unattended. 

Crosstalk can also run 
most scripts that were creat- 
ed with Crosstalk Mark 4. 
DCA's popular advanced com- 



munications program for 
DOS. This is good news for 
people who are migrating 
from the DOS environment 
and have a library of existing 
Mark 4 scripts. When they 
make the change, they won't 
have to manually duplicate 
their Mark 4 scripts' content in 
this program. 

The program also features 
a learn mode that creates 
scripts by monitoring your in- 
teractions with a host and re- 
cording them in a script. You 
can then run the resulting 
script as is in subsequent ses- 
sions with the same host, or 
you can edit it to strip out un- 
wanted sections and to add 
more funclionaiily. 

QuickBar icons are another 
useful feature that you'll appre- 
ciate. They let you quickly ini- 
tiate tasks such as transfer- 
ring files, capturing screens, 
and running CASL scripts. All 
of the items presented in the 
opening menus have Quick- 
Bar icons attached to them, 
so all you have to do to select 
and initiate an activity or func- 
tion from one of those menus 
is to click on the appropriate 
QuickBar icon. 

QuickPad is another power- 
ful nev/ feature, it lets you 
create customized onscreen 
keypads that include objects 
representing your most fre- 
quently used keys, key se- 
quences, and scripts. To per- 
form a specific function, all 
you have to do is click on the 
object that represents it on 
the QuickPad. 

Crosstalk also features a 
built-in text editor. This is help- 
ful when you are working with 
scripts and text files, as it ex- 
pedites the tasks of creating, 
editing, and printing text 
files — within the program. The 
graphical keyboard editor in 
the program makes it easy to 



customize your keyboard lay- 
out. With it, you simply click 
and drag keys wherever you 
want to assign them. You can 
also use the keyboard editor 
to assign scripts and key com- 
binations to individual keys 
and scripts. 

Network users will want to 
take advantage of Crosstalk's 
powerful modem-sharing capa- 
bilities. There are two popular 
LAN APIs (Local Area Net- 



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work Application Program- 
ming Interfaces) compatible 
with most asynchronous com- 
munications servers that 
Crosstalk supports: INTI4 and 
NetWare Asynchronous Serv- 
ices interface (NASI). 

Overall, Crosstalk for Win- 
dows 2.0 is a very impressive 
package. It's hard to imagine 
how DCA could have made 
this great program any 
simpler or friendlier to use, 
Yet despite making it easy to 
use, DCA managed to pump 
Crosstalk with plenty of pow- 
er. Whatever your telecommu- 
nications requirements might 
be, you'll find that this tele- 
communications package not 
only meets but exceeds your 
telecommunicating needs. D 

circle Reader Service Number 391 



DIGITAL 

COMIVIUNICATiONS 

ASSOCIATES 

1000 Alderman Dr. 

Ajpharetta, GA 3Q202- 

4199 

(BDD) 348-3221 



OCTOBER 1993 COMPUTE 75 



PERSONAL PRODUCTIVITY 



Daniel S. Janal 



Don't let your liard 

iilsl< put you 

under pressure. 

Clean up your 

data and work more 

etficiently. 



BREATHING ROOM 

Five years ago, a 20MB hard 
disk was considered a huge 
warehouse for your data. Now, 
it isn't uncommon for some 
games and business applica- 
tions to take up 25MB of hard 
disk space. If you use Win- 
dows or a graphics program, 
it's sure to take up a lot of 
hard disk real estate. And if 
you own a laptop, which gen- 
erally has a smaller storage sys- 
tem than a desktop PC, you 
have an even more urgent 
need to use your limited hard 
disk space wisely 

The advantages of re- 
ducing the amount of 
space you use on your 
hard disk are that your 
programs will run faster, 
you'll be able to keep 
more vital information im- 
mediately available, and 
you'll have room for 
those little utilities and 
games that make own- 
ing a computer worth- 
while even when there's 
no work to do. 

Here's how to get the 
most out of your disk. 

Prune regularly. Do 
you really need your in- 
voices from 1983 on 
your disk? Or the game you 
haven't played since your son 
graduated from ABC's to 
UCLA? Maybe it's time to 
prune the dormant files from 
your disk forever, or at least 
copy them to a floppy where 
they can be stored for an IRS 
audit orfor your grandchildren 
when they learn to read. 

For commonly used pro- 
grams, you might be able to de- 
lete files that are not essential 
to running the programs — now 
or ever. For instance, you 
might want to copy the READ- 
ME file to a floppy in case you 
ever need to use it. In the mean- 
time, you free up valuable 
space. Check the manual to 
see if it lists the unnecessary 
files that can be erased with- 



out damaging the program. 
For instance, if you use DOS 
in the United States, you prob- 
ably won't ever use the key- 
board program for Germany 
that sits in your DOS directory 
Warning: Don't kill a file if you 
aren't 100 percent sure that it 
isn't needed. There are many 
files in your program directory 
that might seem cryptic but ac- 
tually performi valuable func- 
tions. You'll find out when 
you're on deadline. 

Windows users can find 
gold mines on their hard disks 
by eliminating never-used ac- 




cessories, like Windows Write 
and Card. Go to the Main 
menu, choose Windows Set- 
up, choose Options, and then 
choose Add/Remove Win- 
dows Components. You'll see 
check boxes for Readme 
Files, Accessories. Games, 
Screen Savers, and Wallpa- 
pers, Misc. Eliminating the ac- 
cessories will save 1,5MB, 

Many programs have tutori- 
als, Once you've read them, 
kill them. Also, Word for Win- 
dows users can eliminate the 
import filters for never-used 
word processors and graph- 
ics file formats. 

Some programs automatical- 
ly create backups whenever 
you save a file. Delete the back- 
ups, or turn off the automatic 



backup command. Clip art 
and templates can also clutter 
your disk. 

Archive. For files that abso- 
lutely, positively have to be ac- 
cessible and can't be in a draw- 
er of floppies, consider archiv- 
ing. Archiving is a method of 
compressing a file or group of 
files into a single compressed 
file that occupies a fraction of 
the space. When you need to 
read or write to the file, you 
can select the file and expand 
it back to its original size so 
that it can be edited. Many 
free and shareware archive pro- 
grams are available on 
bulletin boards. 

Compress. If you don't 
want to go through the 
trouble of individually ar- 
chiving dozens of files in 
dozens of directories, 
consider compressing 
everything on the disk. 
Several software pro- 
grams can do this. Stuff 
It, Stacker, Double Disk, 
and DOS 6 are widely 
available for less than 
$100, These programs 
compress every file on 
your hard disk. You 
could easily double your 
disk space and turn a 
60MB hard drive into a 
120MB hard drive in minutes, 
Programs load almost as quick- 
ly as they do without the com- 
pression software. 

Be sure to read the installa- 
tion procedures, back up 
your data, install the compres- 
sion program carefully, and 
run every application program 
you have on your disk to make 
sure it works. 

Squeeze. Keep your eye 
open for duplicate files, dupli- 
cate directories, and directo- 
ries and files that could be 
dumped to a floppy or printed 
out and filed in manila folders. 
Archive or use a disk compres- 
sion program. Back up and de- 
lete files you rarely use. Your 
hard disk will repay you with 
better performance. □ 



76 COMPUTE OCTOBER 1993 



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TR 



^ 



Or 



THE 



RO N E OF C H 




he Dark Armv encroaches. 



King Richard falls. And Scotia 



beckons you, laughing. 



In her mad quest for power, Scotia has ravaged the 

kingdom. She seeks the throne, yet it eludes her. 

She's getting desperate. She's getting mean. 






Can YOU STOP HER? DO YOU DARE? 



^■i 







i*' Make Friends and Influence 
People- Cooperate with the helpful, 
sidestep the treacherous and destroy 
the dangerous. 



^ Quick and Easy Combat and 
Spell Casting. 



'^•^ Compass and Automapper 

Included- Adventure through 
ancient keeps and living forests. 
I nearth hidden ruins and 
haunted caves. 

^ Indulge in a Land of Sensory 
Delists- Over 20 megabytes of 
compressed art and special 
effects. Actually hear the clash of 
steel! Feel the blows of terrors 
who slip beneath your guard! 



AN INSPIRED FANTASY 

RPG EXPERIENCE FROM 

THE DEVELOPMENT 

TEAM THAT CREATED 

EYE OF THE BEHOLDER" I AND II. 

Westwood 




Distrihuied Exclusiveiy by 

Available for your IBM PC. • ■-— '^-^* 

Eye of the Beholder I and II aie trademarks of TSR, Inc. 

The Eye of the feeholder garhes,TSR, Inc. and SSI are not connected or related 

in any way to the L^ds of Lore game, Virgin Games, In&, or Westwood Studios, Inc. 

Lands of Lore is a ti^demarkof Westwood Studios, Inc. # 1993 Westwood Studios, Inc 

All rights resei^ed^'^ii^hi is aifegisteredti^^ 

Circle Readcf Service Humber 132 




ARTWORKS 



Robert Bixby 



PIxar One Twenty Eighi 

gives you the 

textures you need to 

win attention for 

your publication or 

presentation 



ROCK ON CD 

For too long we've put up with 
monochrome backgrounds in 
printouts and presentations. 
Or, just as tiresome, the blue- 
to-blacl< gradient fill. Sure, it 
makes the words easy to 
read, but a ho-hum back- 
ground has to have a yawn- 
inducing effect on the informa- 
tion being presented. 

That's why [ was excited 
when I saw Marble & Granite 
(ArtBeats, P.O. Box 1287, fvlyr- 
tle Creek, Oregon 97457; 505- 
863-4429; $349), a two-CD- 
ROM collection of rock tex- 
tures actually digitized from 
the rock face. They make any- 
thing set against them look as 
solid and respectable as old 
money. In the old days, before 
blond wood and ferns took 
over, bank lobbies used to be 




lined with marble and granite 
in order to give the customers 
a sense that the bank had per- 
manence and durability. The 
collection features dozens of 
different kinds of rock in spe- 
cial files for typesetting or la- 
ser printing. 

But you might be looking for 
some textures that weren't quar- 
ried. In that case, Pixar has 
what you're looking for in a sin- 
gle-CD-ROM product called 
Pixar One Twenty Eight (Pixar, 
101 West Cutting Boulevard, 

80 COMPUTE OCTOBER 1993 . 



Richmond, California 94804; 
510-236-4000; $299). True to 
its name, the Pixar product of- 
fers 128 photographic tex- 
tures, including some granite 
and marble, but also including 
many woods, bricks, fabrics, 
shingles, and more. Each tex- 
ture is in two formats: a high- 
resolution (512 X 512 X 24- 
bit) version and a low-resolu- 
tion (128 X 128 X 8-bit) ver- 
sion. Although they don't have 
the TIF extension, you can 
load them as TIF images into 
any program that can work 
with that format. Special soft- 
ware is included to ease use 
of the product with PhotoShop 
and PhotoStyler. The textures 
can be tiled seamlessly to fill 
a screen. 

A similar product. Atmos- 
pheres (TechPool, 1463 War- 
rensville Center Road. Cleve- 
land, Ohio 44121; 216-382- 
1234; $129) provides back- 
grounds in a vector format, 
along with a file conversion pro- 
gram that will translate the vec- 
tors into raster formats, if that 
is your preference. Atmos- 
pheres is available in separate 
packages with titles such as 
Geometric, Patterns, City- 
scapes, Habitats, and (the 
package reviewed) Classics. 
Since the product comes in a 
vector format and at such a 
low price. Atmospheres ought 
to have a lot going for it. How- 
ever, I found the images to be 
not very interesting. They 
have the look of vector clip 
art — the images are com- 
posed of simple areas of flat 
color. A ghosting program 
tones the colors down so they 
won't interfere with whatever is 
in the foreground. 

If it's clip art you seek, you 
should look over the offerings 
of Masterclips. If your needs 
are specific, Masterclips has 
a series of 24 clip art collec- 
tions with different themes 
(Masterclips, 5201 Ravens- 
wood Road, Suite ill, Fort 
Lauderdale. Florida 33312; 



305-983-7440; $19.95 each) 
with titles like Humor, Business/ 
Finance, Communications, 
and so forth. But if your clip art 
needs are general, Master- 
clips has a big. big collection 
of over 6000 clip art images 
on CD-ROM called, well, Mas- 
terclips, of course ($299). 

All of the images are CGM- 
format vector drawings in full 
color. Included is a color-to- 
monochrome utility and a 
browsing utility that makes it 
easier to find the perfect im- 
age for your needs. 

I'm always looking for new 
and unusual ways to publish, 
and I think I've found one of 
the most unusual. Remember 
the tattoos you would occasion- 
ally find in a Cracker Jack 
box? The concept has come 
a long way since I was a kid. 
Nowadays, temporary tattoos 
let you have a realistic, colorful 
tattoo, even if you hate nee- 
dles. They're hot among kids, 
and they make interesting con- 
versation pieces. 

What does this have to do 
with desktop publishing? J.B. 
Marketing (1017 Fifth Street, 
Coronado, California 92118; 
619-435-2322) can turn your 
graphics into tattoos. You can 
put your logo or advertising 
message on biceps all over 
town. 

The washable, waterproof 
tattoos last 3-5 days and are 
easily removed with baby oil 
or rubbing alcohol. 

Have a DTP tip you'd like to 
share? Let me know about it 
by calling (900) 884-8681 , ex- 
tension 7010203 (sponsored 
by Pure Entertainment, P.O. 
Box 186, Hollywood, California 
90078). The call costs 95 
cents per minute, you must be 
18 or older, and you must use 
a touch-tone phone. Or write 
to "Art Works" in care of this 
magazine. And if you don't 
have a tip, call to let me know 
what you're up to, what soft- 
ware you're using, and how I 
can help. 3 



Batfy IllusUatei 



EDUCATIONAL 



JOURNEY INSIDE THE HUMAN MACHINE 



BODYILLUSTRATED^ 




mdofttrwmmfi Hg 





"...an excellent example of how 
interactive programs can succeed 
as teaching tools." 

PC Magazine 



Designed to be fun and easy to use, BODY ILLUSTRATED is a visual and 
audio guide to exploring the hunnan .matomy. BODY ILLUSTRATED examines 
hundreds of body parts from different views and is full of detailed illustrations 
with stunning realism. With just a click of the mouse, each part is explained in 
clear, non-technical language. A digitized voice provides the correct pronuncia- 
tion of anatomical part names, "Instant Help" eliminates the need for referring 
to the manual. 

BODY ILLUSTRATED teaches either by lesson method or through the use 
of the game mode. It is an ideal study guide for students. It's also a valuable 
reference tool for la\^'yers, doctors, nurses, clinics, or anyone who needs to know 
about the human anatomy. Instructors can easily use BODY ILLUSTRATED as 
an interactive anatomy teaching aid. Included in the box is a full-color anatomi- 
cal parts poster and a written study guide. 




Draft & Print 



THE POWER TO UNLEASH YOUR CREATIVITY 



PRODUCTIVITY 




•f- I Draft & Print 

The Pancr la UnlEjish Vwr Creitlvitjr 



DRAFT & PRINT is a simple, yet powerful drafting program that's 
easy enough for the beginner, yet powerful enough for the professional. 
From floor plans and interiors to landscapes, technical illustrations, 
engineering diagrams, and architectural plans; the tutorial will have you 
designing on the day you install the program. With DRAFT & PRINT'S 
extensive collection of drawing tools, full layering, powerful text scaling 
and rotation, your drawings will be far more accurate and to scale than if 
done by hand. And changes are a snap, saving you countless hours in 
editing. 

Forget about special cfiips, graphics boards and extra memory, 
there's no special hardware required. DRAFT & PRINT includes a library 
of over 400 useful symbols. 




Beat The House 



"Overall, it offers the most 
sophisticated features with a lull 
complement of drawing and 
editing tools..." 

Remodeling News 



ENTERTAINMENT 




THE ULTIMATE GAMING TUTOR & SIMULATOR 





"...nearly everything gamblers 
from amateurs to professional 
could want in a game." 

PC Entertainment 



Prepare yourself for the #1 casino gaming experience! Featuring \'i\ id!}- dcLulLU 
graphics and superior sound, BEAT THE HOUSE makes you feel like you're part of 
the gambling action. Not only do you experience the thrill of casino gaming, but you'll 
also learn the skills and techniques of tlie professional gambler. 

Whetlier its Blackjack, Craps, Slots, Video Poker or Roulette, BEAT THE HOUSE 
teaches you how to play. Seasoned gamblers are schooled in strategic counting 
tecliniques as well as profitable betting and play strategies. Once you've learned the 
ailes using the p<->p-up tutor and 160 page study guide, \'ou'll achjally play all the 
games. Up to four plaver can participate using a mouse or keyboard computer 
simulated players can add to the excitement — Watch out, they play to win! 

To order call: 800-722-8988 

Visa and Mastercard accepted. 

Spirit of Discovery 5421 AvenitJa Enemas Carisbad.CA 92008 
Circle Reader Service Number 154 







GAMETEK 



A publishing partnership 



DISCOVERY CHOICE 



Children learn physics 

as they race across the galaxy 

in this entertaining game. 

David Sears 



QUARKYAND 
QUAYSOO'S 
TURBO SCIENCE 

Consider the popular miscon- 
ception of science nuts: 
reserved and reclusive math- 
crazed social outcasts who 
concern themselves first with 
research and last with physi- 
cal exertion. Adults know bet- 
ter, and everyone probably 
remembers at least one well- 
rounded athlete and scholar 
from high school or college, a 
person as at home in the lab- 
oratory as in the gym. Just try 
telling your children that they 
can have the best of both 
worlds, though, If Ihey remem- 
ber the cross-generational pa- 
rade of nerds from movie and 
TV history, they'll stick with a 
good game of baseball or a 
day of bike riding rather than 
glance at a textbook. 

But that was before Quarky 
and Quaysoo's Turbo Sci- 
ence, a delightful game in Si- 
erra On-Line's Discovery se- 
ries. More than being just an 
unusual title. Turbo Science 
manages to integrate scientif- 
ic investigations, spirited com- 
petition, and some hilarious 
cartoon humor in a package 
designed to show kids that 
physics isn't for nerds only. 

First off, the game's name- 
sakes hail from New Delhi, In- 
dia. Though tittering space 
elves, the blobbish little crea- 
tures show tremendous 
spunk and intelligence. Like 
members of so many other 
space-faring species in other 
stones, Quarky and Quaysoo 
found themselves bored silly 
without cerebral challenges, 
so they masterminded a com- 
petition called Turbo Science. 

Perhaps more popular 
than the space elves intend- 

82 COMPUTE OCTOBER 1993 . 




ed, the science competition 
attracts contenders from 
across the galaxy and as far 
away as Australia. The reign- 
ing champ defends her title af- 
ter players climb through the 
difficulty ranks and dominate 
both the churlish Das Liquida- 
tors and the smug Cool City 
Maulers. Besides being a hu- 
morous lot, these opponents 
show children that it takes all 
sorts of people to keep the 
world spinning. 

The actual competition con- 
sists of conducting research 
and answering questions. Oh, 
no — it's a test! Well, not real- 
ly. Turbo Science is actually 
more of a cross-country team 
effort to prove that you know 
more than your opponents — 
the sort of challenge that kids 
relish. 

As each race begins, play- 
ers appear on a map depict- 
ing the game environs, from 
mountainous retreats to urban 
sprawl and down to the 
beach. Each race winds 
through slightly different terri- 
tory, so players won't encoun- 
ter the same characters and 
locales too often, 

At each location, kids have 
the opportunity to earn money 



by answering questions 
about objects, people, and 
phenomena they see there. 

For each spot on the map. 
Sierra's artists did a fine job 
of merging whimsy with an 
essential precision — young 
scientists-in-training will 
poke, prod, and investigate vir- 
tually everything that appears 
onscreen. To do this, children 
simply use the pointer to 
click on points of interest. The 
program makes more signifi- 
cant detective work possible 
with the researcher's toolbox, 
which is available on the icon 
bar at the bottom of the 
screen. 

Clicking on the Eye icon 
and then clicking on on- 
screen objects invokes a pop- 
up window full of amusing 
bits of information — a descrip- 
tion of the big-brained Dr. D. 
Vious, for one. With a click on 
the Tools icon, kids can sum- 
mon a full box of tools that eve- 
ry serious explorer needs. With- 
in the box is a voltage meter 
that reveals the shock value 
within thunderclouds, power 
lines, or electric sockets, A 
sound meter counts the deci- 
bels emanating from scream- 
ing children, noisy motor- 



bikes, and ice cream trucks, 
Other tools include a tape 
measure for pinpointing dis- 
tance, length, and height: a 
beaker that tells volumes; and 
a scale that weighs almost 
everyone and everything. 

Players could perform their 
entire investigation before at- 
tempting to answer even a sin- 
gle question, but with so 
many objects onscreen at 
once, they'll certainly miss a 
few important tidbits of informa- 
tion. Still, if they choose this 
strategy, they'll improve their 
memories as they attempt to 
retain large amounts of data. 

Turbo Science doesn't 
stress memorization ex- 
tremes, however, and once 
the questions begin, all tools 
remain available for use. If a 
player can t quite remember 
which mountain climber has 
the least mass or which light 
source burns the brightest, 
it's easy to take a moment to 
find out- The competitors con- 
tinue to struggle with their 
own questions, though, so the 
local Turbo Science team 
should keep its investigations 
brief. 

Sometimes a question 
might prove too difficult for 
even veteran Turbo Science 
scientists. In those rare cas- 
es — say, when kids need to 
know about air pressure differ- 
ences between elevations or 
the nature of electrical cur- 
rent — they can take time out 
by clicking on the Research 
icon and cracking the books. 
One book, actually: Turbo Sci- 
ence Research Guide, a 145- 
page feast for hungry minds. 

Sierra crammed each 
page with the laws of phys- 
ics, clear explanations, and 
humorous examples. Children 
will also encounter great mo- 
ments in science history in 
the book, as well as inventors 



and scientists (plus more 
amusing characters)- Turbo 
Science refers players to the 
exact page they need to 
read for the question at 
hand, but the material found 
within the text is so well done 
that many kids will probably 
keep reading long after find- 
ing the necessary information, 
In fact, the research guide 
stands up fine on its own and 
makes perfect reading for a 
kid's spare time. 

As the difficulty level in- 
creases, the race route pass- 
es through more locations on 
the game map. Kids may 
choose a variety of strategies 
to win. One strategy is to an- 
swer a few questions, earn 
enough money to BMX to the 
next checkpoint, and then an- 
swer more questions — whatev- 
er it takes to stay ahead of 
the competition. 

An alternative method, 
though one that requires some- 
what stronger nerves, has play- 
ers answer questions and 
earn the maximum $9,999 for 
a location, then buy the most 
expensive transport to zoom 
ahead of their opponents. Ei- 
ther strategy promises some 
entertaining interlude anima- 
tion as Quarky and Quaysoo 
speed on their way. 

Turbo Science works over- 
time to provide positive feed- 
back. After each correct an- 
swer, Quari<;y or Quaysoo — 
depending on whom the play- 
er selected to run the race — 
teleports, flies, moonwalks, or 
explodes onto the screen, yell- 
ing support for his human 
teammates. At the finish line 
of each race, Paco Suave, a 
Turbonet newscaster, inter- 
views either the winners or 
the losers, and while the dia- 
logue runs on the silly side, it 
never insults a child's intelli- 
gence — a matter of serious 



importance for an education- 
al product, 

The music for every screen 
serves well, but the gold 
stars for truly superior aural 
achievement go to the sam- 
ples. A flurry of grunts, mild in- 
sults, and random chatter 
from the cartoonish space 
elves adds considerably to 
the fun. 

Children will love Quarky 
and Quavsoo's Turbo Sci- 



IBM PC or 
compatible (T6- 
KIHZ B0386 or 
taster), 640K RAIVI, 
256-CQlor VGA, Z^A- 
inc)} l]igti-density 
lloapy drive, tiard 
drive witti 3MB 
free, mouse; 




ence just for the gameplay. 
And if your youngsters ever 
ask things like why steel 
ships don't sink or how air- 
planes fly, now they can find 
out for themselves. 

Through the act of discov- 
ery, players are bound to un- 
cover more than the simple 
kinds of answers we adults 
could give them in the often 
minimal amount of time we 
have to spare after work or be- 
fore dinner. So give your chil- 
dren Turbo Science, and 
they'll uncover the answers 
they're seeking. But for real- 
world demonstrations, you'll 
still have to take the little knowl- 
edge hunters on expeditions 
to the Hoover Dam, the air- 
port, or even the circus. O 

Circle Header Service Number 392 



supports all major 
sound cards— 
$49.95 

SIERRA ON-UNE 
P.O. BOX 485 
Coarsegold, CA 

936U 

(SOO] 326-6654 



OCTOBER 1993 COMPUTE 83 



GAME INSIDER 



Shay Addams 



VIRTUAL 
UNREALITY 

This is absolutely the last time 
I'll ever attend CES via its new 
virtual-reality option, created 
"exclusively for journalists un- 
able to travel to Chicago for 
the Consumer Electronics 
Show, " Due to a telecommuni- 
cations glitch caused by one 
whopping big sunspot, I inad- 
vertently entered the online vir- 
tual world of TSN (The Sierra 
Network) — and spent the next 
three days trying to find my 



Killer baitecues, 

ttinnelers, dwarves, 

U-boats, monsters 

and mazes, and a nevi 

Lowe in adventure 

make ttie Consumer 

Electronics Sliow 

set CItlcago alire tor 

comftiiter gamers. 





84 



way out of Larryland! I man- 
aged to rip the virtual helmet 
off my head just in time to 
catch the last flight out of 
Tucson and see demos of all 
the new games previewed at 
CES — several of which should 
be on the shelves by the time 
you finish this sentence, 

One I can't wait for is Blood- 
stone, an epic Dwarven tale 
that's "a role-playing game in 
the classic style," according 

COMPUTE OCTOBER 1993 



to Mindcraft's Ali Atabek, best 
known for his Magic Candle se- 
ries. "No technological mar- 
vels, no startling new fea- 
tures," he continues. "It's the 
gameplay and intriguing story 
that make Bloodstone." What 
Bloodstone lacks in bells and 
whistles, it makes up for with 
curious characters, bizarre rac- 
es, and unconventional mon- 
sters. The Killgrill. for instance, 
is a ferocious creature that 
looks exactly like a barbecue 
grill. Another uncommon as- 
pect is Bloodstone's incorpo- 
ration of alternative endings. 
As you progress through the 
quest, you must constantly 
make decisions regarding two 
Dwarven tribes, and the out- 
come hinges on which tribe 
you choose to help. 

Siege: Walls of Rome is Mind- 
craft's follow-up to Siege. In ad- 
dition to a different historical 
setting, it features a wholly re- 
written engine whose artificial 
intelligence is less predictable 
than that employed in Siege, 
making the game more chal- 
lenging. You wage similar bat- 
tles: i<nocking down or defend- 
ing city walls and fortifications 
with catapults, boiling oil, and 
infantry troops. Walls of Rome 
also introduces a heightened 
sense of authenticity, Mind- 
craft thoroughly researched an- 
cient Rome to make the 
troops, weapons, and other as- 
pects of the game as histori- 
cally accurate as possible. 
The Carthaginians ride ele- 
phants into battle, and sap- 
pers (used to tunnel under 
walls and collapse them) form 
an important and realistic part 
of your arsenal in this tactical 
war game. 

Mindcraft also has a futuris- 
tic strategy role-playing game 
called Strike Squad on the 
way, offering the latest in high- 
end graphics and animation. 

Dynamix's first sub simula- 
tion, Graue Wolfe (Gray Wolf), 
is an all-new interpretation of 
submarine warfare designed 



by Mike Jones, who did the 
classic Harpoon, It's built 
around a graphics and menu 
system similar to Dynamix's 
Great Warplanes series. In ad- 
dition to individual missions as 
a German U-boat captain, you 
may also play out an entire ca- 
reer that spans World War II, 
A new implementation of Dy- 
namix's 3-Space technology 
depicts ocean waves when 
you're surfaced or looking 
through the periscope as 
you've never seen them in a 
computer game. 

Evil wizards, power crys- 
tals, mazes, crypts — all the 
trappings of the traditional mon- 
sters-and-mazes genre await 
the adventurer who sets foot in 
King's Ransom, a role-playing 
game from Canada's Rea- 
dySoft. Its most distinguishing 
aspect is graphics thai scroll 
in any direction when you 
move. According to Rea- 
dySolt, the frame rate hits 60 
frames per second, which ac- 
counts for the incredibly 
smooth scrolling. 

Next month, look for Leisure 
Suit Larry Vl, the latest in Al 
Lowe s series about Larry Laf- 
fer and his nonstop quest for 
girls, girls, girls. This time, you, 
as Larry, enter a TV dating 
game show. The grand prize 
is a two-week vacation at the 
La Costa Lotta resort, where 
Lowe promises Larry will meet 
"more girls than ever before!" 
as you quest your way to a 
world-class rendezvous in the 
penthouse suite (but not with 
Passionate Patti!}. Sierra says 
there is no frontal nudity, but 
the game is rated PG-13. With 
Larry VI Sierra launches a new 
and unique look for each new 
adventure. This one will show 
hi-res graphics when running 
in Windows, as well as lo-res 
graphics under DOS. It also 
introduces a scrolling text win- 
dow at the bottom of the 
screen, one you can scroll 
back to review recent dia- 
logue and narration. D 



■©Ifl^/^ ft' 




T 



Relentless Space Combat - 

For Naive Rookies or Hardened Vets 

^^ s a student at the TCSN Academy, you custom- 

design and fly unique combat, rescue, and 
search and retrieval missions from the 
CyberSchool's holographic simulator. In the 
' Wm^ Commander tradition, the game features 
a dynamic musical score, improved rendered, 
Bj^-mapped graphics, and a dazzling array of customizing 
options. But Wing Commander Academy is not another cine- 
matic extravaganza — it's an intense dogfighting marathon. 






r'assatasam 



♦ Custom-design a variety of missions that match your skill level as 
you place fighters, capital ships, data pods and ejected pilots - up 
to 10 in each of the four action spheres. 

♦ Save up to 24 games to disk and trade with your friends or upload 
them to bulletin boards to challenge others. 

^ Request random missions where each action sphere yields an 
unknown number of enemy ships with pilots of varying skill levels. 

♦ Climb into the cockpits of the new Confederation Wraith or 
Kilrathi Jrathel< fighters for a new combat experience. 

♦ Select a cybernef wingman - from a frightened cadet to a hotshot 
veteran. 

♦ Fly from the cockpit view or try the chase-plane view for a new 
perspective on the dogfighting action. 

♦ Sharpen your combat skills as you compete for high-point honors. 

♦ Engage the "Gauntlet" - a dogfighting marathon with 15 progres- 
sively difficult levels of attacking ships - including three flights of 
fighters in each level. 

♦ Build missions so tough that even our professional Wing 
Commander pilots can't survive. 



A Stand Alone Game — No previous Wing Commander experience necessary. 

bif MS-DOS 386SX, 386, 486 or 100% compatible systems. 

Rnd Support: Ad Lib, Sound Blaster, Rolnnd LAPC-1 or 1007o compatible sound card 

required for music. 
Requires: 256-color VGA, 2 me^ RAM, 5 megs hard drive spao 







-rii 



^TEacniSEaB 


■* 


4i 


*lAl- i 


W'" 


M. 


a|*UU 






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Actual screens may vary. 



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Arts* Company 



PO B0< 161750 AUSTIN, TX 78716 



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MULTIMEDIA PC 



David English 



WHAT'S NEW IN 
PC SOUND? 

COMDEX is never dull. It allows 
companies to trot out their lat- 
est hardware and software for 
the rest of the industry to see. 
This year's Atlanta COIVlDEX 
showcased two impressive PC- 
based audio technologies. 

The first involves a new chip 
from Yamaha. If you have a 
sound card in your PC, it most 
likely has a Yamaha 0PL2 or 
0PL3 chip. It's the chip that 
gives you Ad Lib compatibility 
and allows you to add music 



YAMAHA 0PL4 

FM and Wave Synthesizer 




Because ol Yamaha's 

new 0PL4 chip, 

the next generation of 

sound cards will 

include General MIDI. 



86 



and sound effects to your PC 
games. These chips are actu- 
ally simple synthesizers that 
can simulate (with varying ac- 
curacy) musical instruments 
and electronic sound effects. 
Most sound cards also 
have chips that let the card 
play back recorded sounds. 
These chips let you hear nar- 
ration and real-sounding mu- 
sic and give you what most 
eople refer to as Sound Blas- 
er compatibility. This kind of 
sound is very realistic be- 
cause the actual recorded 
sounds are stored on your 
disk or CD-ROM, On the down- 
side, they take up huge 
amounts of disk space — as 
much as 10MB a minute when 
recorded at CD-audio quality. 

COMPUTE OCTOBER 1993 



■PPei 

/ eg 



A third kind of PC-based au- 
dio is called MIDI (Musical In- 
strument Digital Interface). 
MIDI is an electronic commu- 
nications standard popularized 
by the synthesizer companies. 
An extension of the standard, 
called General MIDI, has be- 
come so popular on the PC 
that some sound cards now 
have General MIDI built in or of- 
fer it as an add-on. Most Gen- 
eral MIDI systems use a wave- 
table technology where the 
sound of an instrument (such 
as an organ or trumpet) is 
stored in a ROM chip. The mu- 
sical instruments sound very re- 
alistic because the actual pat- 
terns of the sound are used to 
re-create the sound. And be- 
cause MIDI files basically store 
only note-on, note-off, pitch- 
change, and instrument- 
change information. General 
MIDI is extremely efficient — 
often Vioo the size of a WAV- 
based audio recording. 

Soon, every sound card, 
even the inexpensive ones, will 
be able to include General 
MIDI. At COMDEX, Yamaha an- 
nounced its new 0PL4 chip, 
which is essentially an 0PL3 
chip with a built-in 2MB Gen- 
eral MIDI ROM chip. An option- 
al chip, the YSS225 Effect Proc- 
essor, will let you add high-qual- 
ity sound effects, such as echo, 
reverberation, flange, distortion, 
panning, and surround. 

Why should you be interest- 
ed in adding General MIDI to 
your sound card? If you play 
games, you'll hear dramatically 
better music (check out The 
7th Guest and X-Wing, and 
you'll wonder where they're hid- 
ing the orchestra). If you're into 
music, you'll have the guts of a 
high-quality synthesizer on 
your sound card. Add an inex- 
pensive MIDI keyboard, and 
you'll have a music workstation. 
And check out Musitek's new 
program, called MIDISCANfor 
Windows. Scan your sheet mu- 
sic with a hand-held or flatbed 
scanner, and MIDISCAN will 



convert it to a standard MIDI 
file that you can play on your 
General MIDI sound card. 

The other interesting devel- 
opment in audio technology at 
COMDEX was the growing num- 
ber of sound cards that feature 
a DSP (Digital Signal Proces- 
sor). A DSP is a separate proc- 
essor that can run specialized 
programs indepandentfy of 
your computer's main proces- 
sor. Creative Labs announced 
that it will support the three- 
dimensional QSound technol- 
ogy with the Sound Blaster 16 
ASP'S built-in DSP processor. 

Centigram showed its Tru Vo- 
ice text-to-speech software 
that converts spoken English or 
Spanish into natural-sounding 
computer speech. Dragon Sys- 
tems demonstrated Dragon Dic- 
tate, its advanced voice recogni- 
tion system, which has a 
30,000-word active vocabulary 
Both programs will be available 
for sound boards that use Ana- 
log Devices' DSP chip. 

SierraSemiconductor also an- 
nounced QSound and voice rec- 
ognition for its DSP chip. Inter- 
play will be shipping a special 
voice recognition version of 
STAR TREK: 25th Anniversary 
with many of the sound cards 
that use Sierra's DSP (also 
known as the Aria chip set). 

As you can see, sound 
cards aren't just for game mu- 
sic anymore. We're about to 
see a revolution in the PC's abil- 
ity to work with sound. 

New Multimedia Section 

Starting with our November is- 
sue, COMPUTE will have a 
monthly eight-page Multimedia 
PC section, and that's in addi- 
tion to our usual multimedia re- 
views, Each issue will include 
this column (renamed "Fast For- 
ward"), a four-page multimedia 
feature (with special emphasis 
on how-to and product-round- 
up articles), a one-page multi- 
media product spotlight, and 
two pages of the latest multime- 
dia products. n 



■» 



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TURTLE BBACH SYSTEMS 

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Circle Reader Service Number 247 



*. 



ENTERTAINMENT CHOICE 



Pamper astronauts, launch rockets, and 

risk lives as you race to be 

the first in this early-space simulation. 

Scott A. May 



BUZZ ALDRIN'S 
RACE INTO SPACE 



Where were you when man 
first set foot on the moon? 
This question once defined a 
person's connection to one of 
tfie most pivotal events in hu- 
man history. Twenty-four 
years later, in a world where 
space shuttles are almost com- 
monplace. Apollo 11's epic 
flight seems to have lost 
much of its significance. 

Now you can recapture the 
milestones, setbacks, tri- 
umphs, and tragedies of this 
remarkable era with Buzz 
Aldrin's Race into Space. 
Whether you're reliving faded 
memories or experiencing it 
for the first time, this is one voy- 
age you won't want to miss. 

The game represents a mar- 
velous first effort by designer 
Fritz Bronner and is based up- 
on his 1988 board game, Lift- 
off. Like many of today's so- 
called white-collar simula- 
tions — SimCity (Maxis), Rail- 
road Tycoon (fvlicroProse}, 
and Utopia (Konami) — Race in- 
to Space is essentially a 
game of top-level resource 
management. 

As mission director for ei- 
ther the U.S. or the Soviet 
space program, you oversee 
production, planning, testing, 
and launching of unmanned 
and manned rockets. The 
first country to land a man on 
the moon and return him safe- 
ly to earth wins the race. The 
game's distinctive twist is its 
historically accurate back- 
drop of Cold War tensions 
and politically motivated break- 
throughs. It's an intense meld- 
ing of ideals, strategy spirit, 
and speculation into a viable 
game format. 

The computer simulation 
sports one player per side, 

COMPUTE OCTOBER 1993 




with the usual combinations 
of human- and computer-con- 
trolled opponents. Multiple 
game types and difficulty lev- 
els help balance the odds be- 
tween disparately skilled play- 
ers or increase the challenge 
when you're matched against 
the computer 

The Historical fvlodel or- 
dains higher costs and better 
reliability for the U.S., while 
the Basic Model begins the 
game with the two sides on 
equal ground. Both models 
can have historical or 
customized astronaut and 
cosmonaut rosters. Three dif- 
ficulty settings not only affect 
overall conditions and perform- 
ance levels but also raise offi- 
cial expectations of your job. 
Fall too far behind, and you'll 
be fired. Three levels of diffi- 
culty raise or lower your man- 
agement of this most pre- 
cious cargo. 

The race officially begins in 
the spring of 1957 and pro- 
gresses in single turns, each 
equal to six months' time, for 
a maximum of 20 years. An at- 
tractive aerial view of each 



country's spaceport — Cape 
Canaveral in the U.S. and 
Baikonur in the U.S.S.R. — dou- 
bles as a main navigational 
menu. As each side's pro- 
grams evolve, many more 
buildings are added to the 
nnap. On the horizon loom 
such emblems of government 
influence as Ihe Capitol (or 
Kremlin) and Pentagon (or 
KGB headquarters). Also with- 
in view are Arlington National 
Cemetery and the Kremlin 
Wall, which serve as grim re- 
minders of the dangerous 
tasks that lie ahead. 

The most important steps 
in creating a ttiriving space 
program are to set short- and 
long-term goals and then es- 
tablish an itinerary, The race 
is composed of a series of mis- 
sion milestones, like rungs on 
a technological ladder, each 
taking you a step closer to 
the moon. 

Historical milestones in- 
clude everything from orbital 
satellites to manned lunar land- 
ings. Each phase contains 



many test missions for equip- 
ment safety, duration limits, 
and astronaut training, for a to- 
tal of more than 300 mission 
variations. Your job is to se- 
cure sufficient funding, pur- 
chase necessary equipment, 
budget research and develop- 
ment, design missions, and 
schedule launches. 

Follow the historical guide- 
lines with no major mishaps, 
and you'll be rewarded with 
prestige points, which mean 
higher ratings and increased 
funding. You must complete 
many programs to successful- 
ly complete a milestone, but 
you can skip others or cut 
them short. The elaborate stra- 
tegic considerations and deci- 
sions you face add both 
stress and risk managennent 
to your already weighty list of 
responsibilities. 

Other fascinating aspects 
of play include astronaut re- 
cruitment, training, and what 
amounts to psychoiogical cod- 
dling. Choose to play from 
the historical roster, assem- 
bled from 106 simplified pro- 
files (per side) of real-life 
flyboys, or create your own 
customized characters. 

Astronauts are rated on 
five skills: capsule handling, lu- 
nar module piloting, space- 
walking, docking, and endur- 
ance. After you've assembled 
primary and backup flight 
crews, you assign each to the 
appropriate training facilities 
to bolster their ratings. You 
must also monitor your flight 
crews' emotional well-being: 
Astronauts are a highly com- 
petitive breed and respond 
negatively to inaction. Some 
simply don't get along: pair- 
ing incompatible recruits pro- 
vokes bad feelings that could 
jeopardize your mission. 

Despite the administrative 
nature of your duties and the 



lack of time limits imposed on 
players' turns, the game in- 
stills momentum with its sub- 
tle sense of urgency. As your 
programs grow through vari- 
ous stages of rocket and 
class of spacecraft, the 
stal<es are raised and tension 
mounts. Your job entails far 
more than pencil pushing; 
you must judiciously and firm- 
ly push the envelope on 
space exploration. Should 
you skimp on research and de- 
velopment costs or fudge the 
recommended safety factor? 
Is it worth bumping up a 
launch date — risking time, 
money, and lives — in the 
name of Cold War posturing? 
These are just a few of the 
questions you must contend 
with in a high-tech whirlwind 
of politically charged cause 
and effect. Although you 
have no direct control of a mis- 
sion once a rocket launches, 
it's tremendously exciting to 
watch each stage unfold, 
with the promise of success 
and the threat of failure. 

The graphics are extremely 
well designed, including 
bitmapped, digitized, and ray- 
traced artwork spread among 
nearly 30 information-packed 
screens. The program boasts 
CD-quality multimedia effects 
with more than 1000 historical 
photos and stop-motion anima- 
tions. Although a far cry from 
realtime video, these make- 
shift animations add substan- 
tial flavor to what otherwise 
could've been a dry simula- 
tion. The bland musical score 
is best turned off, but keep 
the digitized samples of rum- 
bling launch effects and mis- 
sion control chatter. One com- 
plaint: The game consists 
almost entirely of static 
screens, but the designers 
didn't double the graphic res- 
olution or offer an sVga op- 



tion. Games with such techni- 
cal information desire a slick, 
hi-res veneer. 

Included are Brenner's ex- 
cellent product manual and 
supplementary 132-page his- 
torical guide, The Conquest 
of Space, cowritten by 
Robert Reeves. Both docu- 
ments are generously illustrat- 
ed — the first with itemized 
screen shots and charts 
galore, the latter with NASA 
photos and chronologies of 
historical events. To feed the 
interest these books stimu- 



m PC or 

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loland (LAPC-1. MT- 
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late, Bronner also has written 
Buzz Aldrin's Race into 
Space Companion (Osborne/ 
McGraw Hill). A terrific 400- 
page collection of designer 
notes, insider tips, strategies, 
and history it includes Bren- 
ner's interview with Edwin 
("Buzz") Aldrin. NTERPLAY 

Buzz Aldrin's Race into :'RODUCTIONS 
Space is the first computer .'TSZZ FitCli Ave. 
game to fully capture the com- ■""■. CA 9271 4 
plexity intrigue, and exhilara- 969-GAiyiE 

tion of this volatile period in his- 
tory The integration of these 
elements into a dynamic strat- 
egy contest, with profound 
educational merit, is nothing 
less than extraordinary □ 

circle Reader Service Number 393 

OCTOBER 1993 COMPUTE 



89 



6AMEPLAY 



Paul C. Schuytema 



BURNING RUBBER 

On a weekend drive down an 
unfamiliar, winding road, I 
long for an old MG-TD to tame 
the banking blacktop. Of 
course, a manual transmission 
is essential; I glide through the 
gears to the reassuring 
"snick" of the tight clutch. I 
turn the wooden steering 
wheel tight into the corner, find- 
ing that perfect line where the 
car seems to ride on rails as 
it accelerates into the straight- 
away. Crowds cheer, and I 
choose not to pit. Instead, I try 
to put one more lap between 
me and the pack, 




Let one ol these 

simulations drive you 

to exhilarating 

exhaustion as you 

control the most 

powerlul machines 

on tiiB road. 



Shaking my head, I realize 
that it's the middle of the week 
and I'm nol out on a twisting 
road or burning up the Grand 
Prix at Hockenheim. I'm safe 
in my Midwestern study drip- 
ping sv/eat all the same as I 
eat up the asphalt on my PC, 
steering wheel in one hand, 
joystick in the other. 

When I loaded Car and Driv- 
er from Electronic Arts, 1 trem- 
bled at its possibilities. Set up 
as an electronic issue of Car 
and Driver magazine, the 
game features m-depth arti- 
cles that focus on ten cars, 
from the Lamborghini Coun- 
tach to the Shelby Cobra. 

There are also articles on 
ten different driving areas, 
from the Mahomet drag strip 
to California's Route 1. You 
choose a car and a place to 
drive, slide on the fingerless 
leather gloves, pop the 
clutch — and you're off. 

I've found that two of the 
nearly limitless scenarios real- 
ly feed my driving machismo. 

90 COMPUTE OCTOBER 1993 



The first involves taking a^ 
1957 Ferrari Testarossa on 
Highway 97 in New York. 

This classic car zooms over 
the hilly roads, narrowly miss- 
ing the stream below the road 
on one side and the oncoming 
cars in the other lane. The 
drive is set up as a timed point- 
to-point race, and I'm constant- 
ly racing against a recording 
of my last best race. 

My other pulse-pounding fa- 
vorite scenario lets me take a 
Mercedes C11 IMSA to the 
banked, oval Super Speed- 
way. Slamming down the ac- 
celerator, I keep one eye on 
the rpm as I shift up through 
the five speeds to well over 
200 mph before I hit the first 
bend, just ahead of my three 
competitors. The feeling of 
speed is so real that I can bare- 
ly breathe as I try to keep the 
screaming Mercedes on track 
(any harsh moves and the 
wind will whip under the car 
and lift it like a feather). 

After any race, successful 
or not, I can watch the replay 
in a hi-res simulation of a tele- 
vision broadcast with different 
cameras panning to follow my 
car. 

For my more cerebral driv- 
ing fantasies, I turn to World Cir- 
cuit from f\/licroProse. A Formu- 
la One simulation, World Cir- 
cuit gives me the chance to bat- 
tle for points in a pangiobal se- 
ries of Grand Prix races. 

World Circuit somehow rep- 
licates the real feeling of com- 
peting in a championship inter- 
national race. All the variables 
add up to a true knot in my 
stomach as I wait for the 
green light. 

World Circuit's hypnotic rep- 
resentation of the Zen of driv- 
ing is not an effect to which I 
alone am enslaved. My wife, 
who seems at times to be a pro- 
fessional computer skeptic 
and who certainly is the hard- 
est sell for a computer game 
that I've ever met, sat mesmer- 
ized as she battled a three- 




lapper at Monza. I watched 
her eyes, glassy and manic, 
as she leaned into the turns to 
the sound of her squealing 
tires; she had worked her way 
to sixth place when I paused 
the game to show her a replay 
of her latest pass. She nearly 
killed me for breaking her con- 
centration. She was hooked. 

World Circuit is an effort to 
play because there's so much 
going on and the variables — 
like setting the car's racing 
trim and gearing, navigating 
the pit stops, timing the brak- 
ing to cut inside that fellow 
from France who dogs you the 
whole race — are exhaustive. 

The game even lets me 
tweak the frame rate and 
check my on-the-fly processor 
performance, allowing me to 
create a completely realtime ex- 
perience. At Hockenheim, 
when I'm hot, the competition 
doesn't stand a chance be- 
cause on the second chicane, 
I've found a line that's fast — 
very fast. The only problem is 
that with the slightest miscal- 
culation, I ram my Formula 
One into a concrete wall, and 
I'm out of the race. Just one of 
the risks I have to take. 

To make driving a little 
more realistic, I swap my desk 
chair for a canvas sling gar- 
den chair (it looks dumb, but 
feels right) and clamp Colora- 
do Spectrum's Mouse Wheel 
to my desk, The Mouse Wheel 
is a steering wheel that con- 
trols my mouse, allowing me 
to steer in a more realistic fash- 
ion. The product is great, but 
with every game I have to 
tweak it some to make the 
mouse feel right (Car and Driv- 
er lets me change the sensitiv- 
ity right in the game). But 
when it's hght, I'm out there, 
on the open road. □ 




FUTURIST 



Joyful anticipation turns sour in a tale almost every dedi- 
cated computer game player has shared: After endur- 
ing months of splashy advertisements and media hype, 
you finally bring home that long-awaited software mas- 
terpiece. Expecting to be dazzled by state-of-the-art graph- 
ics and sound, you're instead greeted by an ambiguous 
error message — or worse, total system lockup. Several rein- 
stalls and a half-dozen aborted attempts later, you contem- 
plate a new hobby. 

There are as many different variations to this scenario as 
there are games and !BM PC-compatible systems. 
Sometimes a program installs correctly and then fails in the 
middle of a play session— usually at the worst possible lime. 
In most cases, these problems can be fixed with a simple 
change in your system settings or by creating a plain-vanilla 
floppy boot disk. More serious problems usually mean that 
there's a software bug or that your hardware is incompatible. 
Less threatening, but equally frustrating, are games that 
run flawlessly but just don't measure up to your expecta- 
tions. Some prove too difficult, while others aren't challeng- 
ing enough. Features often touted in advance publicity 
aren't implemented properly, or worse, are dropped com- 
pletely from the final design. For one reason or another, 
you're not a happy gamer. 




Fixing a Hole 

Game publishers respond to program failures, hardware 
incompatibility, and design suggestions with an almost rev- 
olutionary new form of customer service: software patches. 
Software patches afford consumers the unique opportunity 
to repair or enhance their purchases with minimal effort and 
cost. Like a digital bandage for ailing software, patch files 
are designed to swat bugs, tweak playability, and restore 
confidence in a company's product line. Patches are often 
innocuous, changing minor elements of a game to fix isolat- 
ed problems, Sometimes, however, they constitute a major 
upgrade, turning a good game into a great one. 

Entertainment software has grown to proportions 
unthinkable only a few years ago. Fueled by quantum leaps 
in technology and steadily plummeting prices, the once- 
stodgy PC compatible now finds itself the platform of 
choice for today's high-end computer games. Hundreds of 
third-party peripherals have rushed onto the scene: sound 
cards, game ports, video cards, memory managers, and 
disk compression utilities. Game publishers, used to the 
plug-and-play days of Commodore and Atari, suddenly find 
themselves confronted by almost unlimited variations in 
hardware configurations. Creating cutting-edge software 
that runs smoothly on every possible system has become a 
nightmare, while the persistent lack of 
industry standards in the computer 
game world assures that the problem 
just won't go away. Thus, software 
patches are born, 

Upgrades and Bug Swots 

Most software companies employ a full- 
time staff of in-house beta testers, 
whose job is to look under every rock in 
a fantasy realm and to log hundreds of 
flight hours, tracking the elusive bug. 
Given the sheer size of games and the 
number of game variables, attempting 
to eliminate all bugs is a daunting task 
but one most companies feel obligated 
to undertake. "Our beta testers catch 
most bugs," says Bill Linn, director of 
public relations for Sierra On-Line, "but 
it's like proofreading a novel: Everyone 
misses the occasional comma or quo- 
tation mark." Dan Riddle, customer ser- 
vice manager for Mindcraft, considers 
fantasy role-playing games to be the 
worst to debug because everyone 
plays them differently. "We've had peo- 
ple who say, 1 have a problem doing 




l\E^ I 




Article by Scott A. May 



this.' Your initial reaction is, Why did you do that?" Riddle 
says. But, he acl<nowledges, ideally, games should be able 
to handle whatever a player wants to do. 

In addition to answering to those hapless gamers who 
stumble into obscure programming traps, companies must 
also be ready for connplaints from "grognards" — excessive 
aficionados in a particular field who love to grumble about 
technical inaccuracies. These are the players who can 
recite, from memory, the exact turning radius of the F4U-1A 
Corsair and the time it takes, with flaps down, to execute a 
180-degree bank, as well as how much air speed you 
should lose during the turn. While this obsession with detail 
prompts some in the industry to mutter "Get a life," others 
welcome such nitpicking. Jerry Luttrell, director of public 
relations for Dynamtx, admits to employing eight or nine 
grognards as beta testers for Aces over Europe. "We fig- 
ured that if we can make these guys happy, then we know 
we've done our job," Luttrell says. 

King of the Hill 

If you were to select the king in the field of game patches, 
MicroProse Software would likely wear She crown. It's a title, 
however, the company is proud to bear. "We owe it to our 
customers to do our best," says Steve Albinak, manager of 
customer services at MicroProse. "Sometimes it may take a 
revision or two to make software that runs as tight as possi- 
ble on as many platforms as possible." At the top of the 
company's all-time patch list is its massive medieval fanta- 
sy, Darklands. This software problem child received six 
separate patches before the company finally combined 
them ail into a complete reissue of the game, officially 
known as Darklands 7.0. 

Among patches that dramatically enhance their originai 
programs, Dynamix's Aces of the Pacific 1.2 improves air- 
craft performance, enemy pilot artificial intelligence, graph- 
ic detail, animation frame rate, sound effects, and weapons 
performance, "Nearly half of the changes that we made in 

Bugs, patches, hackers, and 
you: why computer 
entertainment is a some- 
times frustrating hut 
usually exciting experience 



ME 




Aces of the Pacific," Luttrell says, "were from customer 
requests — things they didn't like or wanted to be done dif- 
ferently." Dynannix's patch for version 1.02 of Front Page 
Sports: Football makes a great game even better, increas- 
ing playabilily with vast improvements to the Al, the play- 
cailing interface, the sound card support, the league 
options, and the statistical displays. 

The advent of low-cost, high-speed modems has spurred 
increased interest in games offering null or remote modem 
play. Products not originally equipped with a modem option 
are often refitted through patch files or expansion disks. 
MicroProse did just that with the version 1 .5 modem update 
to its best-selling racing game, World Circuit. Not only does 
the update provide a slew of major enhancements affecting 
graphics detail, frame rate, and control options, but two play- 
ers can now tear up the tarmac, connected by remote or null 
modem link. Though initially available only through the patch, 
these improvements will eventually be included in the fvlaster 
Players edition. Other games that have added modem 
options or fixed problems with existing remote play include 
Siege: Dogs of War (Mindcraft), The Perfect General {QQP). 
Tom Landry Football (Merit Software), and Falcon 3.1 
(Spectrum HoloByte). 

Games with minor problems are often updated with add- 
on disks, since most supplements require ownership of the 
original program. Spectrum HoloByte used Operation: 
Fighting Tiger not only to add new scenarios but also to 
automatically upgrade Falcon 3.0 to version 3.01. Other 
notable examples of this bundled approach include 
Gunship 2000 Mission Builder (MicroProse), Red Baron 
Mission Builder (Dynamix), Siege: Dogs of War, 
Megafortress: Operation Skymaster (Three-Sixty Pacific). 
and Great Naval Battles Scenario Builder (SSI). 

Extending Life After Retail 

Many games ward off planned obsolescence with integrat- 
ed construction kits, allowing you to create your own dia- 
bolical levels, articulated missions, and custom characters. 
Such features not only draw players deeper into the game 
but also help sustain a product's long-term market appeal. 
One of the best is surely Stunt Island (Disney Software), in 
which you can design, fly, film, and edit original stunts, then 
share your fabulous footage with friends. Another new 
breed of construction kit can be found in El Fish (Maxis), an 
electronic aquarium simulation thai allows you to spawn 
exotic new species of fish, then share your mutations with 
other aquarium owners. Of course, the classic success 
story is Accolade's lucrative line of golf simulations, each 
containing full-featured course designers. You can't swing 
a nine iron around most major online services without hitting 
dozens of 18-hole courses for Mean 18, Jack Nicklaus 



DD-INS 



Unlimited Golf, or the latest in the col- 
lection, Signature Edition. 

Companies often rekindle interest 
in previously released products with 
stand-alone construction kits. Red 
Baron f\/lission Builder brings a whole 
new dimension to this best-selling air 
combat simulator. Likewise, the 
Gunship 2000 fvlission Builder re- 
newed excitement in a product whose 
shelf life had otherwise peaked. An 
unusual case is f\/lallard Software, 
whose Aircraft & Scenery Designer 
and Aircraft & Adventure Factory ben- 
efit users of another company's prod- 
uct: f>ylicrosoft's Flight Simulator 4. 
CompuServe's Flight Simulation 
Forum bursts with hundreds of unique 
aircraft and scenery packages creat- 
ed with Mallard's programs. 

Taking Matters into Their Own 
Hands 

By far the most fascinating and con- 
troversial area of game patches is that 
of user-created hacks and enhance- 
ments to commercial products. Unlike 
illegal hacks used to break copy pro- 
lection, these playful modifications 
seek to extend legitimate interest in 
popular games. Typical hacks merely 
instruct players how to hex-edit spe- 
cific data files to generate super- 
charged aircraft or the ultimate role- 
playing heroes. Some actually change 
or add features to a game, while oth- 
ers are sophisticated, self-contained 
editors, designers, and managers. 



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Enjoy modem opiions when you play The 
Perfect General from Quantum Quality 
Products. 

Officially, software publishers nei- 
ther condemn nor condone this prac- 
tice, yet they privately express won- 
derment at players' dedication to their 
products. "Most designers are excited 
that people get so involved with their 
games," says Khris Brown, product 
support manager at LucasArts. "We 
can't deny the fact that these user 
modifications can sometimes increase 
the shelf life of a product." Brown cau- 
tions, however, that experimenting 
with hacks can be like putting leaded 
gasoline in a car clearly marked for 
unleaded gas. Once a player ven- 
tures into this gray area, the manufac- 
turer can't be responsible for the con- 
sequences, good or bad. 

LucasArts happens to be the tar- 
get of some of the most prolific and 
unusual game hacks. A current 
favorite is the X-Wing f^ission Design 




Use player-created character editors to 
dig behind the scenes of MicroProse's 
Darl<lands. 




Create new species of fish ana share ihern 
with friends in El Fish from Max/s. 

Kit by Henry Chang, This menu-driven 
program allows you to construct X- 
Wing missions — a feature not includ- 
ed in the original game — with com- 
plete control of all ships, space 
objects, and mission obiectives. 
Another LucasArts title to spur enor- 
mous hacker activity is the company's 
best-selling combat flight simulation, 
Secret Weapons of the Luftwaffe. The 



Beyond Fun and Games: Educating Players 



Where do you fit in this tangled web 
of bugs, patches, and hacks? The 
recent boom of low-cost, high-end 
PCs has put killer game machines on 
the desktops of a record number of 
first-time computer users. Thanks to 
the number of disparate system con- 
figurations, game publishers have 
recently found themselves in the 
awkward position of not only selling 
their products but also educating 
customers about computer hard- 
ware. As a result, entire chapters of 
game manuals must address the 
basics of hardware and software 
configuration, potential problems, 
and possible solutions. For compa- 
nies to admit that it's a hassle, how- 
ever, would be like biting the hand 
that feeds them. 

Let's face it: It's a jungle of hard- 
ware peripherals out there. If you're a 
computer novice and want to play 
games, you'll need to know alaout 
sound cards, game ports, modems, 
video cards, drivers, disk compression 



utilities, memory managers, disk- 
caching tools, and operating systems. 
Confused? Now, try installing a hard- 
ware-hungry game like Origin's Strike 
Commander. It's no wonder that good 
customer support is a game publish- 
er's most valuable asset. 

While companies struggle to 
make games that run perfectly on 
every possible system, what can you 
do to help? 

Get to know your hardware. It 
may sound condescending, but the 
solutions to most problems are within 
your grasp. Get an updated Pegin- 
ner's guide to DOS, memory man- 
agement, and hardware configura- 
tion. Learn which gaming peripher- 
als—usually sound cards and joy- 
stick ports — are most likely to cause 
conflicts with other hardware or soft- 
ware settings. 

Read the troubleshooting sec- 
tion of your software manual. If 
you're still stumped, hit the phone 
before hitting the roof. In addition to 



checking with the software compa- 
ny's technical support line, try calling 
your local dealer or a PC-knowledge- 
able friend. 

If you have a modem, query 
other game players. There may 
be a local BBS in your area, or you 
can check out the game sections of 
national services like CompuServe, 
GEnie, and America Online. Besides 
finding hundreds of fellow gamers 
online, you can often direct ques- 
tions to actual company representa- 
tives. If your software needs a patch, 
you'll most likely find it here. 

When in doubt, stick with 
popular, proven accessories. 
Many gamers have been burned by 
cut-rate peripherals promising 100- 
percent compatibility with better- 
known products. Stick with the top- 
of-the-line accessories if you want to 
be safe. 

If you follow these guidelines, 
you'll soon be enjoying the thrills the 
best computer games offer. And in 
no time at all, you'li be winning. 



94 COMPUTE OCTOBER 1993 




The challenge of computer bridge will never be the same with the 
introduction of Positronic Bridjje, the first artitlcial intelligence based 
bridge game. Whether you are a beginner or expert, Positronic Bridge 
with its cutting-edge computing technology automatically improves its 
skill level as you improve yours, so the game always remains a challenge. 

Included free with the program is the best-selling book "The Basics 
of Winning Bridge" that will have you playing bridge in just one hour. 
You can then improve your bridge skills using the practice mode and 
help keys. 

Other features include: "No Cheat" gameplay {the computer doesn't 
look at your cards to make decisions), rubber or duplicate bridge, 
standard bidding, simple signaling, random deals or preset input, 
show/hide opponents cards. 



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HF HP 




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BiMlns Screen 

Endorsed By Bridge Experts 

"You can V oulgrow Positronic Bridge. 

Two thumbs up!" 

Mike La\\-renL-(j. Berkeley. CA. US.'X 

■Posilronii; Bridge willgkvpou the battle aft/our life. 
Eric Koki.sli. Montrc.-il. Canada 




ReadySoft Incorporated 

30Wer1heirnCourt.Suite2 

Richmond Hill, Ontario, Canada L^ie 189 

Tet: (416) 731-4175 Fax: (416) 764-8867 

Circle Reader Service Number 163 



"Tlie game you can teach to be as f/nml as you arc 
Tony Forrtster. London. England 



For IBM PC and Compatibles 



most plentiful hacks are user-modified 
aircraft, commonly called hexed 
planes, that range from subtle correc- 
tions of erroneous flight models to out- 
rageous fantasy designs. Samples of 
this last category include a 700-m,ph 
Messerschmitt Bf109G-6 (which flies 
at nearly twice the actual aircraft's top 
speed) and a jet-powered B-17 
bomber equipped with oversized 
guns and rockets. Among the most 
ambitious hacks is Anthony Shimizu's 
SWOTL fvlanager 2.1. a TSR program 
that adds new menu options, such as 
reviving dead pilots and viewing up to 
100 modified aircraft. Simitar charac- 
ter editors and game managers also 
exist for Red Baron and Aces of the 
Pacific, Planet's Edge (New World 
Computing), Civilization (fvlicroProse), 
Their Finest Hour (LucasArts), and 
Pacific War (SSI). 

The high-end flight simulator 
Falcon 3.1 has also inspired an over- 
whelming number of exciting and 
inventive user enhancements. There 
are so many, in fact, that one enter- 
prising player created a menu-driven 
sheil to consolidate the plethora of 
TSRs, hacks, and editors. In the 
sports world, there are team and 
league editors for FPS: Football and 
Tom Landry Football, as well as ter- 



BBS Services 

AfVlERICA ONLINE 
8619 Westwood Center Dr. 
Ste, 200 

Vienna, VA 22182 
(800) 227-6364 

COMPUSERVE 
P.O. 80X20212 
Columbus, OH 43220 
(800)848-8199 

GENIE 

401 N. Washington St. 
Rockville, fvID 20850 
(800) 638-9636 



rain editors for Stunts (Br0derbund) 
and pit stop managers for Mario 
Andretti's Racing Challenge (Elec- 
tronic Arts). Fantasy role players can 
also dig behind the scenes with char- 
acter editors for Darklands, Eye of the 
Beholder III (SSI), and Might and 
Magic III (New World Computing). 

Where to Go for Help 

There are almost as many sources for 
game patches, revisions, and user 
enhancements as there are materials 



to choose from. Some software pub- 
lishers automatically mail free up- 
grade disks to registered game own- 
ers (another good reason to fill out 
those pesky registration cards). 
Others report that they will gladly mail 
free upgrades in response to requests 
made either by mail or by phone. 
Modem users have a much wider 
choice when searching for help, add- 
ons, and enhancements. Subscribers 
to national electronic information ser- 
vices such as CompuServe 
(GAMERS, GAMEPUB, and FSFO- 
RUM), GEnie (Scorpia's Games 
Roundtable). and America Online will 
discover a gold mine of patches and 
game supplements. In addition, most 
publishers maintain customer-service 
bulletin boards that are stocked with 
upgrades, custom levels, hints, and 
tips. Check your software manual for 
BBS telephone numbers. 

Only the Beginning 

The items mentioned here represent 
only a small portion of a much larger 
(and still growing) overall picture. As 
long as software publishers care 
about the quality of their products, 
and customers enjoy using them, 
computer games will continue to 
enjoy a healthy life after retail. Q 




96 COMPUTE OCTOBER 1993 



64/128 VIEW 



So why does a 

professor of electronic engineering 

still use a 64 in his office? 

Tom Netsel 



Phil Hoff is a professor of 
electronic engineering 
al California State Uni- 
versity in Chico. He 
wrote me recently to say 
thiat although the sctiool pro- 
vides him with a 33-MHz 
486 PC, he still uses a 64 in 
his office. This fact has 
been a source of some puz- 
zlement to his students. 

Hoff also serves as the fac- 
ulty adviser to Eta Kappa 
Nu, the national honorary so- 
ciety for electrical engi- 
neers. On fliers urging soci- 
ety members to attend a 
campus meeting, someone 
added the following teaser: 
"Maybe we can find out why 
Hoff still uses a Commodore 
64." 

Hoff saw the flier and 
went to the meeting pre- 
pared. Here's his reply that 
he wrote and gave to the stu- 
dents. It's been edited slight- 
ly for space reuirements. 

"First things first. I don't 
use just the 64, I use a PC 
for all the things that the 64 
can't do and for some 
things that a PC just does 
better. But the 64 stiil sees 
plenty of use. 

"Speed. My PC takes 37 
seconds to boot (without vi- 
rus checking, which will 
soon be added and will 
lengthen boot time), My 64 
takes two seconds. I often 
have little programs to write 
that might take five lines of 
BASIC. On the 64, they're 
up and running before the 
PC finishes booting. 

"Viruses. The problem is 
nonexistent on the 64. Can 
you say the same for your 
computer? 

"Editing. Loading an editor 
to edit a file or program is ab- 
surd. Give me a cursor on a 
64, and I can edit. Its editor 
is powerful and intuitive. 



'DOSIessness. I put 
DOS, UNIX, and C in one 
bag. Granted, they are in de- 
mand in industry, but any- 
body who says he loves 
them should be a computer 
engineer. The only way I 
can navigate in DOS is to 
keep a book of what joking- 
ly is called its syntax at my 
computer desk. No such 
problems with the 64. 

"Continuity. I have lots of 
programs that I've written for 
the 64 to perform things I 
commonly need. There's no 
way I'm going to take the 
time to convert them to 
some PC BASIC (although I 
do admire QuickBASIC). 

"Hardware cost. The sys- 
tem I have now is a 128 and 
a duai mode color monitor 
This system was bought 
used for $200. Commodore 
still sells about a million a 
year. That's more than 10 mil- 
lion in all. Total sales of PCs 
and clones are just over 20 
million, Macs? Eat your 
heart out — maybe 2 million. 

"Software cost, I consider 
pirating of software immoral. 
I will not do it. I also consid- 
er paying $200.00 for a 
word processor to be immor- 
al and stupid. I will not do it. 
My word processor cost me 
$10-95 and is quite satisfac- 
tory. I've never paid more 
than $25,00 for a piece of 
64 software, PC software is 
outrageously priced and out- 
dated before you learn to 
use it. Any good software 
for the PC is usually share- 
ware. I believe in the share- 
ware concept. If I use a pro- 
gram consistently, I pay for 
it. But for the 64, lots of 
good software is PD and 
therefore is free." 

Thanks for writing. Profes- 
sor. I hope your students prac- 
tice what you preach, 3 



GAZETTE 

64/128 VIEW G-1 

Why the professor still uses a 64, By Tom Netsel. 


AS THE DISK SPINS 

Find out what's really on your disks. 
By Henning Vahlenkamp. 


G-2 


REVIEWS 

GeoShell and Help Master 64. 


G-8 


FEEDBACK 

Questions, answers, and comments. 


G-12 


WORLD VIEW 

The Commodore scene in Venezuela. 
By Edwin P. Krisch Stark. 


G-1 4 


PD PICKS 

Stereo SID Player and DigiPlayer. 
By Steve Vander Ark. 


G-1 5 


BEGINNER BASIC 

Saving information to disk. By Larry Cotton. 


G-16 


MACHINE LANGUAGE 

What the asterisk means. By Jim Butterfield, 


G-1 8 


PROGRAMMER'S PAGE 

What it takes to program other computers. 
By Randy Thompson. 


G-20 


GEOS 

The plot to save GEOS and the 64. 
By Steve Vander Ark. 


G-22 


DIVERSIONS 

Into a digital black hole. By Fred D'Ignazio. 


G-24 


PROGRAMS 

Coins (64) 
Name Machine (64) 
Megamorph (64) 
Menu Maker (64) 
Redi-Riter 128 
Double Dub 1541 (64) 
Explorer 64 


G-25 
G-28 
G-31 
G-34 
G-35 
G-36 
G-37 



OCTOBER 1993 COMPUTE G-1 



One of the most confusing subjects for beginning 
users and for some intermediate users is 
Commodore's disk structure and format. This article 
will attempt to shed some light on disk organization down to 
the most basic level, i'm not going to discuss disk com- 
mands, but rather DOS, track and sector layout, block com- 
position, and group code recording (GCR) fundamentals. 

We'll concern ourselves 
with the three current 
Commodore disk drives: 
1541, 1571, and 1581. For 
all practical purposes, each 
drive organizes its disks in 
a similar way with the 
exception of the number of 
sectors and location of the 
directory track (more on 
these differences later). 

Before we get into look- 
ing at the disks themselves, 
let's take a look at some of 
the developments in 
computers that led us to 
where we are today. We'll 
begin with the disk oper- 
ating system, known more 
commonly and simply as 
DOS, Everything regarding 
a disk's structure is deter- 
mined by this operating 
system that's located in a 
ROfvl chip inside the disk 
drive. Since DOS is so vital, 
you might wonder how it 
came about. 

It all started more than 
ten years ago with Commodore's introduction of the 4040 
dual drive for the PET 4016 computer. This drive was an 
upgraded version of the 2040 and 3040 drives that had 
been used in earlier PET models. 

Single Drives 

Then, in 1981, along came the 1540 drive for the newly 
released VIC-20. Commodore assumed most users would 
prefer an inexpensive tape drive to store data and pro- 
grams, so it didn't want to invest a lot of research and 
development funds in a new operating system for home 
users, in an effort to keep costs down. Commodore adapt- 
ed the 4040's DOS to this single drive. While the 4040 was 
equipped with a parailel IEEE-488 bus that sped informa- 
tion along eight bits (one byte) at a time, the 1540 got a ser- 
ial bus that restricted data to a snail's pace of one bit at a 
time. Now we can see why Commodore disk drives aren't 
exactly speed demons unless we employ an external fast- 
loader. The exception is a 1571 or 1581 attached to a 128. 



AS THE 

DISK 

SPINS 



Two years later, Commodore released the 1541 for its 
new Commodore 64 computer. This drive was a slightly 
modified 1540. When Commodore developed the 1571 for 
the 128 and then the 1581, it continued with the tradition of 
modifying and adapting its existing DOS. 

in addition to a faster parallel bus. the old 4040 had two 
processors, one for disk management and the other for 

drive control. Its DOS was 
intended for this dual-proces- 
sor scheme, but Commodore 
modified it for a single proces- 
sor in future drives, 

As a result, the current DOS 
spends a lot of time reminding 
itself that it's working with only 
one processor. Since up- 
grades were merely new code 
tacked on to old. DOS has be- 
come bloated and inefficient. 
The used with many disk 
commands (NO: DISK NAME, 
ID, for example) is a holdover 
from the dual drive 4040 days 
when one drive was designat- 
ed drive and the other was 
drive 1. The is optional with 
a 1541, but its use does en- 
sure the most reliable opera- 
tion. See table 1 for more 
information about DOS ver- 
sions used in different Com- 
modore drives. 

All isn't as bad as it seems. 
Commodore did learn a few 
lessons with the 1581 . Its DOS 
was greatly optimized as 
shown by the tremendous amount of unused space in its 
ROM chip. Thus the 1581 is more efficient than either the 
1541 or 1571. In addition, various fastloading devices can 
speed things up considerably by using their own disk man- 
agement and loading routines instead of relying on those 
used in the drive that were supplied by Commodore. 

Disk Basics 

Before going into specifics, let's take a look at disks and 
drives in general. A floppy disk is a thin, circular piece of 
plastic material encased in a protective jacket. Generally, 
this plastic is covered with a magnetic film of nickel alloy. 
Initially, the magnetic particles in this film are arranged in a 
random fashion, but formatting the disk organizes or polar- 
izes them in a way that the drive can understand. 

Data is read from and written to a disk by the drive's 
read/write head, which is moved back and forth across the 
disk by a motor. If you look at a floppy, you'll notice an oval 
slot approximately one inch long. This opening is where the 



BY HENNING VAHLENKAMP 





7 



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head accesses the spinning disl<. 

The head contains a piece of Iron 
with a coil of wire wrapped around it. 
In order to write information to a disk, 
a small current is passed through the 
coil, turning it into an electromagnet. 
The resulting magnetism changes the 
polarity of the particles on the area of 
the disk below the head. The direction 
of the current and its duration deter- 
mine how the particles are aligned. All 
data on a disk is represented by the 
positions of these particles. 

As the magnetic particles on the 
disk spin beneath the drive's read head 
at 300 rpm, they generate a small elec- 
tric current. This current is analyzed by 
the drive and is converted into data 
which then is sent to the computer. 

Disk Format 

As mentioned previously, all Commo- 
dore dhves have a similar disk format. 
Figure 1 represents a disk formatted 
on a 1541. On this SVinch disk, there 
are 35 concentric circles called 
tracks. Track 1 is the outermost, and 
track 35 the innermost. The disk's 
directory is located on track 18. 

Each track is composed of a vary- 
ing number of 256-byte sectors. The 
actual number depends on the track's 
circumference. The larger outer tracks 
contain 21 sectors, while the number 
drops to 17 for the inner tracks. See 
figure l again. 

The 1541 has one read/write head, 
so it uses just one side of a disk. The 
1571 has two heads, so it utilizes both 
sides of a disk. Side contains tracks 
1-35, and side 1 has tracks 36-70, 
The index or timing hole tells a drive 
where each sector is by timing how 
long it takes for a disk to revolve. This 
hole is not used on Commodore disks. 

Something Different 

A 1581 3''2-inch disk is somewhat un- 
usual compared to its 5''..-inch siblings. 
The 1581, which was developed from 
the Amiga disk drive, uses an Amiga- 
style MFM {Modified Frequency Mod- 
ulation) format rather than Commo- 
dore's GCR. MFM sees the disk as 
double sided with 80 tracks per side 
with ten 512-byte sectors per track. 

In order to make the 1581 compati- 
ble with the other drives, Commodore 



hub ring 



Figure 1— A 1541 Disk 



track 1 

track 1 8 
(directory), 

track 35 



index hole 




altered the MFM physical format by 
creating a logical disk format that is 
single sided with 80 tracks and 40 
256-byte sectors per track. Track 40 
contains the directory. You don't have 
to worry about the physical format 
since all DOS operations use the logi- 
cal one. Conversion between them is 
performed automatically during every 
disk access. 





Table 1 




Disk Drive Geneaology 


Drive 


Year 
Introduced 


DOS 
Version 


4040 


1979 


2.1 


1540 


1982 


2.5 


1541 


1983 


2.6 


1571 


1985 


3.0 


1541C 


1986 


2.6 


1581 


1987 


10.0 


1571 


1987 


3.1 


154111 


1988 


2.6 



There are other MFM formats, how- 
ever, including MS-DOS and numerous 
versions of CP/M, The 1571 can recog- 
nize and read some of these formats. 
With the proper program, you can write 
to MFM disks with a 1571 dhve. 

The Diredory 

Every disk requires a way to keep 
track of filenames, their locations, their 
sizes, and so on. The directory han- 
dles these chores and more, making it 
easy for users to deal with files. The 



#of 

free 

blocks 



$15 
byte1 



Figure 2-A BAM Entry 

Sectors in Track 

01 23 45 67 I B91011 12131415|161 71819 2021 22 23J24 2526 27 £829 3031J 32 3334 35 36373839 
11 1 1 1 1 11 1 1 11 1 I 1 1 ill 1 1 11 I o| T O" 



byte 2 



byte 3 



byle4 



Qs allocated 
1 = free 



byleS 
1581 onlyri 



byte 6 



TRACKS SECTORS 

1-^17 0-*20(21) 
18^24 0-)18(19) 
25^30 0^17(18) 
31 ^►SS 0->16(17) 



one block 



directory is so important that it has its 
own track; IB on a 1541 and 1571 
and 40 on a 1581. 

On a 1541 or 1571 disk, sector of 
track 18 contains the BAM (Block Allo- 
cation Map) and all general disk infor- 
mation, while sectors 1-18 contain the 
filenames and related file information. 
The 1581 uses sectors 0-2 for disk in- 
formation and sectors 3-39 for the file- 
names and their attributes. Each file 
sector can have up to eight file 
entnes, which explains why there Is a 
144-file limit on 1541 and 1571 disks 
and a 296-file limit on 1581 disks. 

The reference manual that comes 
with a disk drive explains the layout of 
a file entry, so I won't cover it here. It 
also details the disk information in the 
first few sectors of the directory track. 
The one thing not clearly explained is 
how the BAM is organized. 

The BAM is a table that shows the 
drive which sectors on the disk are free 
and which have been allocated. This is 
necessary to prevent data already on 
the disk from being ovenA/ritten. 

Figure 2 shows a typical BAM 
entry. With a 1541 or 1571 disk, four 
bytes represent the sector allocation 
of a track; a 1581 BAM entry uses six 
bytes. Each track is represented in 
the table by one entry, with the first 
byte indicating the number of free 
sectors in that track. 

The remaining bytes are broken 
down into bits, with each bit 
representing a sector. If the bit is 0, 
then that sector is allocated; if it's 1, 
the sector is free. On a 1541 or 1571 
disk, the last three bits of byte 4 are 
always 0, and they can be disregard- 
ed since the largest number of possi- 
ble sectors is 20. 

Blocks 

Block and sector are two terms used 
interchangeably by most Commodore 
users to refer to the 256 bytes of data 
that comprise the fundamental unit of 
storage on a disk. For all practical 



G-4 COMPUTE OCTOBER 1993 



SOFTWARE SUPPORT 

INTERNATIONAL 

We Stock America's Largest Selection Of C-64/C-128 



'Ifiousands of Commodore Oumers Cfuiost Us 
ilf Their One Stop Suppfier . iHere's Wfiy.' 
^ Largest Selection of Commodore Software in the U.S.A.! 
After six years in business, nobody in the Commodore market 
is more committed lo your Commodore than we are. We have 
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purposes, they are the same. To be 
precise, however, there are some 
academic differences. 

The term sector explicitly means 
those 256 bytes, the ones a user can 
examine with a sector editor, The term 
block also refers to those 256 bytes 
plus some additional information that 
is used by the drive only. A track 
actually consists of a sequence of 
blocks, not sectors. Average users 
needn't make this distinction, however. 

Figure 3 shows a typical disk block. 
Basically, a block is composed of two 
distinct parts: the header and data sec- 
tions. The header section contains gen- 
eral information about the block, while 
the data section contains the actual 
bytes of information. Note the disk ID in 
the header. All blocks receive a copy of 
the two-character ID that you specify 
when formatting the disk. 

Both the header and data sections 
begin with synchronization marks to 
help the drive locate information. Next 
are the field identifier bytes, which in- 
dicate whether a header or data sec- 
tion follows. A header is identified by 
$08 in hex in this byte, and data is in- 
dicated by $07, Each section also has 
a checksum made up of the track num- 
ber, sector number, and the two IDs. If 
the checksum is wrong, the drive rec- 
ognizes an error in that block. 

Next come two Off bytes. These 
bytes are used as padding by DOS 
when the disk is formatted. The head- 
er block uses two $0F bytes, and the 
data block uses two $00 bytes. Both 
are called Off bytes and are not used 
after formatting. 

The first two bytes in the data 
block's 256-byte storage area are 
called the forward pointers. These 
bytes point to the track and sector of 
the next block in this file. 

Finally, both blocks end with a gap, 
which is more unused space. The size 
of gap 1 is constant. This header gap is 
filled with eight $55 bytes and provides 
breathing room between the header 
and the data. The size of the intersector 
gap or tail gap varies, depending on 
the size of the track. This prevents your 
drive from accidentally ovenwriting the 
start of the next sector, 

GCR Simplified 

The GCR (Group Code Reading) for- 
mat of the 1541 and 1571 that I 
touched upon earlier is undoubtedly 
one of the least understood terms in 
the Commodore vocabulary, GCR, a 
broad term encompassing the track/ 
sector layout as well as the actual 
method by which data is read and writ- 
ten, dates back to the pioneer days of 
home computing. It was developed 
around 1978 for use with the 2030. 
G-6 COMPUTE OCTOBER 1993 





Table 2 




Commodore GC 


p- - -,, 


Decimal 


Binary GCR Codes 





0000 


01010 


1 


0001 


01011 


2 


0010 


10010 


3 


0011 


10011 


4 


0100 


01110 


5 


0101 


01111 


6 


0110 


10110 


7 


0111 


10111 


8 


1000 


01001 


9 


1001 


11001 


10 


1010 


11010 


11 


1011 


11011 


12 


1100 


01101 


13 


1101 


11101 


14 


1110 


11110 


15 


1111 


10101 


Example 


30 decimal equals 0001 


1110 binary and 011011 11110GCR 



Commodore's first disk drive. 

By the GCR process, an 8-bit data 
byte is split into two 4-bit nybbles. 
Each of these nybbles is then assigned 
a 5'bit GCR code. Commodore calls 
this binary to GCR converting. A binary 
nybble can be converted into any one 
of 16 different values, ranging from all 
Os to all Is, The GCR table contains 16 
combinations. See table 2. 

When writing, the resulting 10-bit se- 
quence is stored to disk and represents 
a data byte. When reading, the process 
is reversed, and the 10-bit GCR byte is 
transformed into an 8-bit data byte 
which is then sent to the computer. All 



16 GCR codes are stored as a table in 
the drive's ROIVl, Every time the disk is 
accessed, DOS performs one of these 
GCR conversions. 

The GCR process may seem tedi- 
ous and does slow down the drive, 
but the conversion does have a pur- 
pose. If five unconverted data bytes of 
value 255 (40 1 bits) were written 
directly to disk, DOS could confuse 
them with sync marks, creating chaos. 
GCR prevents this, since no combina- 
tion of the codes can produce a 
sequence of 1 bits longer than eight. 

Wrapping Up 

This article has touched on many as- 
pects of Commodore disks and drives 
that are seldom covered. As you can 
see, without your being aware of it, 
there's a complex series of events tak- 
ing place when you format and main- 
tain a disk. While much of this 
Information is of little practical use to 
the average user, understanding how 
much the humble disk drive actually 
does can give you a better apprecia- 
tion of its value. 

If you're interested in exploring this 
topic further, you'll need a good sec- 
tor editor and GCR editor, I'd also 
recommend a disk utility system 
called The Maverick V5 produced by 
Kracker Jax and available from Tenex, 
Software Support International, and 
elsewhere. It has both of these hacker 
tools and a host of other powerful 
ones. For further information, you 
might also check out books such as 
The Anatomy of the 1541 by Abacus 
Software and Inside Commodore DOS 
by Reston Publishing. Q 



Header/ 

Data/ 




Figure 3 — A Disk Block 


"Sector n' 


Sync Mark 1 


40 1 bits 

Header field identifier 

Sum of sector #, Track # and two IDs 

Sector # of this block 

Track # of this block 

First ID character 

Second !D character 

Off Byte (padding) 

Off Byte (padding) 

8 $55 bytes 

40 1 bits 

Data field identifier 

Track of next block 

Sector of next block 

254 bytes of data 

Sum of track, sector, data 

Off byte 

Off byte 

Variable intersector gap 


$08 (hex) 


Checksum 1 


Sector # 


Track # 


ID1 


ID 2 


$0F 


$0F 


Gap 1 


Sync Mark 2 


$07 (hex) 


Track 


Sector 


Data 


Checksum 2 


$00 


$00 


Gap 2 









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REVIEWS 



GEOSHELL 



If you're a typical GEOS us- 
er, you probably don't need 
ggoShell. If you use GEOS 
because it lets you manage 
your files and disks with 
sucti intuitive ease, then 
geoShell is not the interface 
for you. 

Oh, it will manage your 
disks and files, but this inter- 
face isn't going to hold your 
hand through the process. 
The whole desktop meta- 
phor is missing from 
geoShell. Gone is the easy- 
to-understand [ogic that 
gives a visual sense to your 
computing tasks. For exam- 
ple, you no longer pick up a 
file icon and drop it on the 
drive icon to copy it to that 
drive, There are no icons in 
geoShell: there's only a blink- 
ing cursor awaiting your 
typed commands. A lot of 
you should probably turn 
the page right now and for- 
get about this review. 

Still with me? Then brace 
yourself. Once you get the 
hang of using geoShell, you 
may never think of GEOS in 
the same way again. There 
are plenty of differences be- 
tween this interface and the 
deskTop. You have to mem- 
orize some commands or 
do as I do and keep the man- 
ual handy. There are no pret- 
ty little icons: geoShell uses 
a CLI or Command Line Inter- 
face. This means you con- 
trol what the computer does 
by typing in text commands. 

These commands give 
you unprecedented access 
to the workings of your 
GEOS system, It's kind of 
like the difference between 
driving a nice solid family sta- 
tion wagon or a sports car 
with a manual transmission. 
With geoShell, you can real- 
ly feel the road and control 
what's going on. The power 
lies with the fact that 
geoShell doesn't limit you to 

G-8 COMPUTE OCTOBER 1993 



a set of choices on a menu. 
Instead, geoShell gives you 
the tools and the access 
point to affect your equip- 
ment directly. 

Here's an example of 
what I'm talking about. 
When you want to print a 
document with deskTop, 
you simply select Print from 
the file menu or drop the doc- 
ument's icon on the printer 
icon. The system takes over 
and does whatever it needs 
to do to print that document 
as GEOS is programmed to 
doit. 

With geoShell, you can 
do the same thing by typing 
PRINT followed by the 
name of the file you want to 
print out. But you don't 
have to stop there. You can 
add various parameters to di- 
rectly address the printer 
and print out text using what- 
ever settings you care to in- 
clude. There's no way to do 
this gracefully under the 
deskTop. 

When you start up 
geoShell, your usual GEOS 
screen is replaced by a 
small 12-line window in the 
middle of the screen. You 
are also presented with a 
blinking cursor awaiting 
your Input. That's it (unless 
you spice up your screen 
with the BACKPATT com- 
mand, which lets you set 
the background pattern to 
any of 32 GEOS patterns). 

If you want to take a look 
at the files on a disk, you 
have to type the directory 
command, DIR. If you want 
to run a file, you either type 
the filename and hit Return 
or list the directory, cursor 
back to the file, and press 
Return after the name. File 
copying, deleting, renam- 
ing, and so on are also ac- 
complished by typing the ap- 
propriate command, fol- 
lowed by the name of the 
file. You can use the stan- 
dard wildcards to save a 



good deal of typing. 

In addition to letting you 
add parameters when ac- 
cessing your printer, 
geoShell lets you use vari- 
ous parameters with the DIR 
command. You can list only 
those files which fit certain 
limitations, such as a range 
of file dates or a specific file 
type. There are several vari- 
ations on the TYPE com- 
mand, which displays text 
files on the screen without 
opening an application. 

You can define the func- 
tion keys (which GEOS itself 
pretty much ignores altogeth- 
er) to fire off any commands 
you specify. On top of that, 
you can define hot keys, two- 
key combinations that load 
and run any application or 
desk accessory you pro- 
gram into a combination. 
For example, the hot-key se- 
quence W-R can be pro- 
grammed to load and run 
geoWrite. Some combina- 
tions are already pro- 
grammed, but you can de- 
fine up to 128 of them to 
make running your own sys- 
tem as quick and painless 
as possible. I found this to 
be a lifesaver when I had 
trouble remembering the cor- 
rect program name. Since 
geoShell is case sensitive, I 
couldn't remember if the 
spelling for geoWrite 128 
was geoWrite 128, GeoWrile 
128, or what. 

Compatibility is no prob- 
lem since geoShell supports 
every kind of Commodore 
drive and RAM device — 
from the 1541 to CMD's FD- 
4000 and from a 1764 REU 
to a multimegabyte RAM- 
Link. If you run geoShell 
from Gateway with its driv- 
ers set for native mode par- 
titions on CMD devices, 
geoShell will also support 
the native mode partitions. 
You can install and use a 
fourth drive and use Jif- 
fyDOS to control all of those 



devices. 

For using partitioned 
RAM. devices, FD drives, 
and hard drives. geoShell in- 
cludes a path command. 
This nifty feature lets you 
place geoShell itself in only 
one of the partitions and 
then specify the path to it 
for the system to use. From 
then on. no matter where 
you are. geoShell will be ac- 
cessible as long as you 
place a very small loader 
file called GETSHELL in eve- 
ry partition. The arrow keys 
access the last ten com- 
mands you've typed. Press- 
ing the Shift key and the 
Run key simultaneously 
loads and runs the first ex-- 
ecutable file on the active 
drive. You can also type 
more than one command on 
a line- 
Now I won't say that us- 
ing geoShell is simple, even 
with its extra features. The 
problem I experience most 
often is not knowing how a 
filename is spelled exactly 
or whether there are upper- 
case letters in the name. I 
had a lot of trouble in remem- 
bering which letters had to 
be capitalized while trying to 
install ImageWriterDS. 

Another minor inconven- 
ience is that geoShell won't 
let you run a 40-column pro- 
gram when you're using the 
128 in 80-column mode. Oth- 
er interfaces ask if you'd 
like to switch and then go 
ahead and do it if you say 
so. With geoShell. you must 
manually change screen 
modes {which in my case re- 
quired a scramble for the 
manual again to find the com- 
mand to type) and then run 
the file again. 

To be fair, I'm sure that 
each of these frustrations 
would vanish if I would start 
to use geoShell regularly. Af- 
ter all. the only reason I had 
to check where the upper- 
case letters were was be- 



t^ 



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REVIEWS 



cause I had forgotten that there was a 
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covered that the Alt key on my 128 will 
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documentation is excellent, by the 
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Oh, I know memorizing things like 
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HELP MASTER 64 

If you're a seasoned programmer who 
can use PEEK, POKE, VAL, FN, and oth- 
er BASIC commands as well as you 
can English, then this program isn't for 
you. If you're learning BASIC, however, 
and stumble occasionally over the prop- 
er syntax of a command, then check 
out Help Master 64, 

Help Master 64 offers instant on- 
screen help for 69 BASIC commands — 
everything from ABS to WAIT. What 
makes this program especially helpful 
is that it's at your fingertips even while 
you're programming. If you're in the mid- 
dle of a programming session and get 
stuck on a command, you can call up 
Help Master, get the information you 
need, and then return to your program- 
ming. Help Master doesn't interfere 
with BASIC or any program that you 
may have in memory. 

To get help on any command, sim- 
ply type a quotation mark (') and the 
command. Press Return, the top half of 
the screen clears and fills with helpful 
information about that command. 
Press f1, and the help screen disap- 
pears, returning you to your original 
screen. Some commands have more 
than one screen of information availa- 
ble. In this case, press f7 to advance 
to the next screen. 

When Help Master is activated, you 
can enter a quotation mark only and 
press Return to get a list of all com- 
mands for which help is available. 
This index screen also explains how to 



6-1D COMPUTE OCTOBER 1993 



get specific information about any of 
ttiese commands. 

When you call up a command's 
help screen, you get a variety of infor- 
mation. The screen presents the com- 
mand and its abbreviation, which usu- 
ally is the command's first letter and its 
shifted second letter. Next on the 
screen is the command's syntax, v^filh 
an example of how you might enter it in 
a program. Some portions of the syn- 
tax are set off in square brackets to in- 
dicate that they are optional. 

Beneath the command's syntax is a 
short explanation of what the com- 
mand does. Some screens are linked 
to additional screens if the explanation 
is too long to fit in the space provided. 
If that's the case, simply press f7 to 
call up the next page. 

Finally, at the bottom of the window, 
you'll see four page numbers. These 
are the pages in various reference 
books where you can find additional in- 
formation about the command in ques- 
tion. These books include Commodore 
64 Programmer's Reference Guide, 
Handbook for BASIC for the Commo- 
dore 64, and the two versions of Com- 
modore 64 User's Guide. 

Since Help Master resides in RAM un- 
der the BASIC 8K ROM (40960-49151 ) 
and in most of the 4K block that starts 
at 49152, it won't interfere with the 
DOS Wedge, which is located at 
52224-43247. Machine language pro- 
grams that operate within this range 
will not work with Help Master. 

If you're in the middle of a program- 
ming session and realize that you 
need Help Master but it isn't loaded, 
that's not a problem. You don't have to 
quit the first program. There's an al- 
ternative method for loading and run- 
ning Help Master after you have anoth- 
er program in memory. A simple SYS 
call then lets you activate Help Master. 

When you run Help Master, you'll 
probably notice its 1985 copyright no- 
tice. This little program has been 
around for a while. For any program to 
be in production this long, you know it 
must be doing something right. 

As I said at the beginning. Help Mas- 
ter 64 is not something an experienced 
programmer will need. It's designed for 
the person who is learning BASIC and 
still needs to consult reference materi- 
al frequently. It's also a boon to those 
who program infrequently and need to 
brush up on BASIC syntax and usage. 

CHRISTIAN FLEMING 



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OCTOBER 1993 COMPUTE G-11 



FEEDBACK 



Corrections to 

previous articles, 

the jiffy 

clock explained, 

a SpeedScript 

modification, and 

more 



Bug-Swatter 

There seems to be some text 
missing from John Elliott's "Up- 
grading Without Changing Plat- 
forms" in the June issue. 

JOHN KOESTNER 
HAZELWOOD, MO 

The printer inadvertently re- 
peated ttte line at the bottom 
of page 5 on the top of page 
6. This extra line pushed the fi- 
nal line of the article off the bot- 
tom of the page. We apolo- 
gize for the error The last sen- 
tence of the article should 
read as follows- 

"The investment of time, en- 
ergy, and money by the soft- 
ware and hardware develop- 
ers Is an indication of their con- 
viction that our Commodore 
computers will be productively 
used and enhanced by prod- 
ucts for many years to come. " 

Time of Day 

I was trying to figure out how 
to use TIS as a timer. Can 
this clock be reset to (or 
any number) without turning 
off the 64? Also, I thought 
that all numeric variables 
were used without a dollar 
sign on the variable name. 
Since TIS holds a number, 
why isn't it displayed as Tl? 

Evidently TIME is another 
clock, because when I type 
PRINT TIME, it displays a pro- 
gressively larger number. Af- 
ter some experimentation, 1 fig- 
ured that this number advanc- 
es approximately 60 times 
per second. Can you please 
explain about this also? 

RICK MONTOYA 
MIAMI, FL 



The variables TIS and Tl 
stand for TIMES and TIME, 
but only the first two letters of 
the variable name are signifi- 
cant. These two variables tell 
you the value in the jiffy 
clock, but they put the time in 
slightly different formats. As 
you've discovered, the clock 
ticks 60 times a second. The 

G-12 COMPUTE OCTOBER 1993 



Veo-second unit of time is re- 
ferred to as a jiffy. 

The clock is set to when- 
ever you turn on a 64 or 128. 
To reset it from BASIC, in- 
clude the line T!$ = "000000". 
Note that Tl = won't work. 
You can read the value of Tl, 
but you can't set it (except in- 
directly through TIS). You may 
set Tl$ to other values: for ex- 
ample, to set a time of 1:35 
you would use Tl$="013500". 
The time uses a 24-hour for- 
mat: After 23:59:59, Tl$ 
wraps around to 00:00:00. 

The variable Tl tells you the 
total number of jiffies that 
have passed since the clock 
was reset. Divide Tl by 60 to 
convert this value to seconds. 
TIS is just another way of look- 
Ing at the jiffy clock — // chang- 
es the number of jiffies to 
hours, minutes, and seconds. 
One reason to make TIS a 
string variable (with a S after 
the variable name) is that it 
prints the time in a consistent 
format with leading zeros. Be- 
cause TIS is a string, you can 
use the MID$ function to ex- 
tract the hours, minutes, and 
seconds. To convert a string 
to a numeric value, use the 
VAL function. For example, 
PRINT VAL(TI$) would print 
120 for a time of 000120. 

Tape or Disk? 

A friend of mine uses 
SpeedScript, and his version 
of your word processor does 
not use the prompt TAPE OR 
DISK? Wke mine does. I don't 
l^now of anyone who still uses 
a tape drive, and I'd love to de- 
lete this prompt. He said it 
took only a few POKEs, but 
he can't remennber where he 
saw them. Can you help? 

ALEX PARKS 
ALEXANDRIA, VA 

It has been a few years since 
we published this tip. but it is 
a helpful one if you never use 
a Datasette or tape drive with 
our word processor Load but 



don't run a copy of 
SpeedScript. Then type 
POKE 4904,162: POKE 
4905,8: POKE 4906,76: 
POKE 4907,61: POKE 4908, 
19. After you press Return, be 
sure to save this modified ver- 
sion of SpeedScript with a 
new filename. From then on 
when you load and run 
SpeedScript. it assumes that 
you'll be using a disk drive. 

Mass Deletions 

Is there a way I can delete a 
whole section of numbers 
from a BASIC program on my 
64? For example, can I delete 
lines 200-300 without typing 
each number and then press- 
ing Return? 

ROGER HOWARD 
LOS ANGELES, CA 

The 128 has a DELETE com- 
mand, but it's not available on 
the 64. There is one simple 
way that will save you some 
time and typing. If your lines 
are numbered by IDs, in imme- 
diate mode enter the follow- 
ing line with your program 
loaded. Change the STEP val- 
ue if your program is num- 
bered differently. 

FORT=2D0 TO 300 STEP 10: 
PRINT T: NEXT 

When you press Return, num- 
bers 200, 210, and so on will 
print to the screen. Cursor to 
the first number and press Re- 
turn. Keep pressing Return un- 
til you run out of numbers. If 
you need more lines, just en- 
ter the line again, covering 
the desired range. Be careful 
that you don' I print more than 
20 lines to the screen at one 
time, or they will scroll off. 



Do you have a question or 
comment? Write to Gazette 
Feedback COMPUTE Publica- 
tions, 324 West Wendover Av- 
enue, Suite 200, Greensboro, 
North Carolina 27408. G 



YOUR PRODUCTIVITY! 



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WORLD VIEW 



Edwin P. Krisch Stark 



Kbit won't find 

many Commodore 

dealers in 

Venezuela. What you 

will find is a loyal 

group of Commodore 

owners. 



G-14 COMPUTE OCTOBER 



VIEW FROM 
VENEZUELA 

jHola, amigos! Greetings 
from Caracas, Venezuela, to 
all 64 owners! I hope to give 
you a deep, although short, 
view of the Commodore world 
in the land of El Dorado and 
dense jungles- 

First of all, let me tell you that 
ov*/ning any computer is seen 
around here as a snobbish ges- 
ture. Very few people have 
them. In this worid, understand- 
ing these machines means so- 
cial catastrophe. There seems 
to be an exception, however, 
among 64 enthusiasts, who 
have formed an undeclared 
brotherhood or hackers. 

A 64 without disk drive 
would cost you two complete 
months of salary in local 
terms, which is about $100 
per month. And that's if you're 
lucky enough to find a dealer 
who will sell it to you. Most of 
us Commodore owners get 
equipment by ordering it direct- 
ly from the United States or by 
asking friends visiting there to 
purchase it. To make matters 
worse, the economical crisis 
here has made local govern- 
ments inhibit imports, so many 
computers reach their owners 
only after being smuggled 
through customs. 

The local computer market 
consists of dealers selling a 
myriad of PC clones; tons of 
them are brought in from Asia, 
most with strange and un- 
known names. Only a brave 
soul would be interested in mar- 
keting Commodore products, 
yet the night is not as dark as 
it may seem. A couple of deal- 
ers struggle but receive pop- 
ular support from the 64 and 
Amiga owners. These owners 
love computers that work right 
out of the box, without the has- 
sles of cards, video incompat- 
ibility, and cheap sound. 

Most 64s stay with their own- 
ers until the computers fail com- 

1993 



pletely or until the owners up- 
grade. Many of these are 
promptly replaced by Amigas 
because of an impressive loy- 
alty to Commodore and its 
products. 

There never has been any 
regular way of obtaining soft- 
ware for 64s, and I doubt that 
this will change since the inter- 
est is shifting to the MS-DOS 
market. It's a strange sight to 
find an original disk in any- 
one's software collection. This 
is a pirate's haven, and some 
even joke about the Colombi- 
an Connection: guys in Colom- 
bia who bring in pirated soft- 
ware from Europe. 

Since the source of new pro- 
grams for the 64 is drying up, 
many users have started 
what's become an intense 
craze that we call shared 
modeming. A group of desper- 
ate users started browsing pop- 
ular BBSs, sharing the expens- 
es of long distance telephone 
calls. The most irksome thing 
about this is that many sysops 
see that we're calling from Ven- 
ezuela and think it's a joke. 
Most sysops are too lazy or 
cheap to make the long dis- 
tance call to validate the guys 
v/ho just called in such an un- 
usual fashion, so they flush us 
out of their systems. This is al- 
so true with the commercial on- 
line systems. 

Those sysops who don't 
pay much attention to valida- 
tion usually trust their callers. 
In return, we provide a nice at- 
titude inside the system and a 
valid credit card number 
when ordering products. 
BBSs with 800 numbers are 
troublesome to use from here. 
Some modeming sharers 
have gone to the extreme of 
taking their computers and mo- 
dems to Miami just to get in- 
side some online services. 

Want to know something fun- 
ny? The 64s were considered 
game machines — not even a 
notch above toys — but now 
the PC clones are the most tar- 



geted market for games. Yet 
they still keep their status as se- 
rious machines. Anyway, I 
have found an advantage to 
this switched situation. I play 
games on clones, but I've start- 
ed writing ciue books for them 
on my 64. Many of these 
books are just for my own use, 
but some I sell. I just turn on 
the computer, load Speed- 
Script, and start typing. For em- 
bellishment, such as maps 
and graphics, I resort to 
GEOS and its power. And 
when I need extra assistance, 
I just transfer my fi les to my Ami- 
ga with a null modem. It works 
fine and keeps my pocket full 
for buying original software. 

Right now I am considering 
the idea of creating a BBS ded- 
icated to adventure games, 
where you can browse around 
to find the clues needed. The 
only thing stopping me is the 
final choice of the right pro- 
gram to handle my needs. 

Here are some final com- 
ments. Programmers, don't 
underestimate the 64. There 
are nearly 15 million of these 
great machines out there, and 
most of them are still in use. Us- 
ers, don't trash your 64. It's 
like Pandora's box in that it's 
full of grief, but it's also filled 
with lots of surprises. If you ev- 
er do upgrade, make it an Ami- 
ga, so Commodore will keep 
these great machines coming. 



Millions of 64s and 128s are 
in use around the world, so 
how about telling our readers 
about the Commodore activi- 
ties in your country? You 
might mention user group ac- 
tivities, software and BBS avail- 
ability, system costs, or any- 
thing of interest 64 and 128 
users. Send a 1000-word arti- 
cle on disk to COMPUTE'S Ga- 
zette, 324 West Wendover Av- 
enue, Suite 200, Greensboro, 
North Carolina 27408. We 
pay $150 for each "World 
View" that we publish. O 



PD PICKS 



Steve Vender Ark 



SOUND 
SELECTIONS 

Before I bring out my picks for 
this month, let me talk a little 
about formats. I'm not talking 
about disk formats, but about 
the method used to store data 
on disk. 

Many drawing or paint pro- 
grams have their own particu- 
lar way of storing the pictures 
that you create with them. 
Many of them use some kind 
of code attached to the name 
of the file to identify what that 
format is. If you are a fan of 
computer graphics, you prob- 
ably know the kind of format 
I'm referring to. 

Over time, certain of these 
various formats tend to be- 
come more common as users 
decide that they like one par- 
ticular program. One format 
will often become something 
of an unofficial standard, and 
its method of data storage is 
copied by other programs. 

Sometimes, though, a pro- 
gram appears that sets the 
standard nght off the bat, but 
in this case I'm not talking 
about graphics. That's pretty 
much what happened with 
Craig Chamberlain's excellent 
music editor called the En- 
hanced Music System, original- 
ly from COMPUTE Books, but 
now distributed by Parsec. 

Chamberlain's format for mu- 
sic files ended with the exten- 
sion MtJS. Due in part to the 
quality of his program and to 
the lack of serious competition 
at the time, this type of music 
file has become the standard 
for Commodore SID music. 

As the years went by. addi- 
tional extensions showed up: 
WDS for lyrics files, PIC for use 
with graphics screens, and so 
on. Those other types of files 
became an important part of 
the standard, thanks to a pro- 
gram called Stereo SID Player 
written by Mark Dickenson. 

Dickenson wrote DigiPlay- 



er. one of my featured selec- 
tions this month. DigiPlayer is 
a digitized sound player that 
has its own particular format. 
This format, the RAW file, has 
become the standard for dig- 
itized sound on the Commo- 
dore. OK, so RAW is the only 
digitized sound format for the 
Commodore, but that makes it 
the standard, right? 

Anyway, since MUS and 
RAW files are common, it's fair- 
ly easy to find enough of them 
to keep SID Player and Digi- 
Player cheerfully singing and 
talking for hours on end. Quan- 
tumLink has more SID music 
files than any other type of 
file, everything from rock-'n'- 
roll to Broadway tunes (my fa- 
vorites). There are also quite 
a few RAW files on Q-Link, in- 
cluding sound bites from Star 
Trek and Looney Tunes. 

But anyway, here's a closer 
lock at both programs. 

Stereo SID Player 10.3 by 
Mark A. Dickenson. Quantum- 
Link filename: STEREO10.3A 
and STEREO10DOC (docu- 
mentation) uploaded by Mark 
AD I, Public domain. 

The original SID Player was 
part of the SID Music System, 
but Stereo SID is definitely a 
new and improved version! 
For one thing (and this is a big- 
gie), this program plays six- 
voice stereo SID files. If you've 
never heard your Commodore 
play in stereo with the SID Sym- 
phony cartridge from Creative 
Micro Designs, you've missed 
a treat! Of course, it plays reg- 
ular three-voice SIDs as well. 

Remember what I was say- 
ing last month about really 
good utilities doing the mun- 
dane with flair and elegance? 
That's precisely what makes 
this program stand out above 
other SiD players. Stereo SID 
Player doesn't just sit there 
while the music plays. The 
screen is alive with wriggling 
shapes and flashing colors. 
There's even a tiny band up in 
the corner (on three-voice 



The screen is alive 
Willi wriggling 
shapes and Hashing 
colors, mere's 
even a tiny band up 
in Ihe comer 
playing its collective 
heart quL 



SIDs) playing its collective 
heart out. More useful is a dis- 
play — both on a keyboard and 
by note names — of the notes 
each voice is playing as the 
song progresses. 

On top of that, the program 
makes it a cinch to find and 
load any song you want from 
a disk and offers plenty of op- 
tions for playing it. The words 
to the song will scroll past if a 
WDS file is included. If there's 
a PIC file, a graphic image in 
Doodle or Koala format will fill 
the screen except for two 
lines of lyrics scrolling by at 
the bottom. But if nothing 
else, this program is worth get- 
ting just for the opening se- 
quence, a rock version of the 
theme from 2001: A Space Od- 
yssey mVn a snazzy bunch of 
screen effects to go with it. 

DigiPlayer By Mark A. Dick- 
enson. QuantumLink filename: 
DIGIPLAYER31.SDA upload- 
ed by Mark AD I. GEnie file 
number 8685: This program is 
shareware: the suggested do- 
nation is $5-$10. 

The first time someone sug- 
gested to me that the Commo- 
dore could play digitized 
sounds. I figured he was nuts. 
Everyone knows that recogniz- 
able digitized sound requires 
vast amounts of memory, and 
memory is one thing the good 
old 64 is short of. But Mark 
Dickenson has pulled it off 
and makes this player shine. 
Not only does DigiPlayer play 
the sound files, but it also lets 
you import digitized files from 
Amiga, Apple ll/GS. Mac, 
Atari ST and Digitalker 128. It 
supports the REU and will 
play digitized files of up to 
400K in size. 

if you want more RAW files 
from O-Link, your best bet is to 
browse that library directly be- 
cause the search function 
tends to ignore them, You'll 
find them tucked away in the 
software libraries under Music: 
MIDI and General/Digitized 
Sound & DigiPlayer Files. □ 

OCTOBER 1993 COMPUTE 



G-15 



BEGINNER BASIC 



Larry Cotton 



Prepare a list 
of things to do and 

then save the 
information to disk. 



WHERE'S THE 
DATA? PART 2 

Any information that you store 
within a BASIC program as DA- 
TA statements will be loaded 
or saved with the program 
whenever you load it from or 
save it to a disk. If the data is 
supplied by the program's us- 
er as INPUT or GET state- 
ments, however, then it's not 
part of the BASIC program. If 
the computer is turned off, the 
data will be lost, Therefore, if 
you want to save any data sup- 
plied by a user, it'll have to be 
saved as a separate program. 

Let's start by writing a sim- 
ple program which generates 
some data: a list of things to 
do. Without using a menu or 
other fancy features (I'll leave 
that to your own creativity), 
we'll ask for a to-do list, one 
item at a time, and then save 
the list to disk as data in the 
form of a PRG (PRoGram) file. 
A complete to-do program 
might include features such 
as saving and loading the list; 
adding, deleting, or rearrang- 
ing items; and printing the list. 

Here's a simple program for 
just getting the list and print- 
ing it to the screen. 

10 PRINTCHnS(147) 

20 DIMI$(10Q): PRINT" NO 

MORETHAMIDD ITEMS!": 

PRINT"[DOWN] PRESS 

ANY KEY TO BEGIN." 
30 BETAS: IFAS=""THEN30 
4DPRINTCHR$(147) 
50X=X+1: INPUT" TO 

D0";1$(X) 
60 IFI$(X)=""THENX=X-1: 

GOTO BO 
70 GOTO 40 
80 PRINT 
90 F0RT=1T0X: PRINT 

IS(T): NEXT 



When you run the program, en- 
ter a few tasks, item by item, 
such as WASH HOUSE, 
PAINT CLOTHES. IRON 
DOG. and so on. Press Re- 

G-16 COMPUTE OCTOBER 1993 



turn after you enter each item. 
When you've entered the last 
item, press Return on an emp- 
ty line. Your complete list, sil- 
ly though it may seem, will 
print on your TV or monitor 
screen. It's also neatly tucked 
away in your computer's mem- 
ory, but it'll disappear when 
you turn off your machine. 
Now let's add a routine that 
will save the information to 
disk. 

100 INPUT"[DOWN]NAMEOF 

LIST TO SAVE";U: 

IFL$=""THENEHD 
110GPEN1,8,1,LS 
120 PRINT#1,X 
130 F0RT=1T0X: PRINT#1, 

l$(T): NEXT 
140 CL0SE1 

Because you've modified the 
program, you'll need to reen- 
ter a to-do list. (You might 
want to make this one sensi- 
ble.) When you press Return 
on a blank line this time, your 
list will print onscreen and 
you'll be prompted to give it a 
name. After you name the 
list, it will be saved to disk in 
the order that you entered it. 

Here's how lines 100-140 
work. Line 100 is a normal IN- 
PUT statement which asks for 
the name of your list so that 
the disk drive can retrieve it lat- 
er. The most important line in 
the program is line 110. Its syn- 
tax is critical. 

When you communicate 
with peripheral equipment 
such as disk drives and print- 
ers, you need to open and 
close channels. Like the com- 
puter itself, the peripheral ex- 
pects to communicate in a syn- 
tax it recognizes. 

In line 110, the OPEN com- 
mand opens a channel for 
communication. The first 1 in 
the command is an arbitrary 
file number, which can be any- 
number from 1 to 127. (Think 
of opening a Manila file folder 
with the number 1 on it.) 
Once that file is opened, da- 



ta can be sent to it by refer- 
ring to its number. 

The next number, 8, sends 
information to the disk drive. 
(If you use a second drive, re- 
fer to it as device 9.) 

The next parameter, 1, 
tells the disk drive to save (as 
opposed to load) this informa- 
tion. L$ is the name of the 
file, which is the to-do list. 

In line 120, we use another 
BASIC statement. PRINT#, 
which sends information to 
the disk drive. PRINT* is simi- 
lar to PRINT except that it 
prints information to disk in- 
stead of to the screen. The 
first piece of information we 
send to the disk is the num- 
ber of items in the to-do list — 
the value of the counter X. 

Line 130 uses a FOR-NEXT 
loop and PRINT# to send the ar- 
ray IS(X) — the items in your to- 
do list— to the disk. 

After all the necessary infor- 
mation is sent to the disk, you 
must close your tile in line 
140. You can now turn off the 
computer, knowing that your 
information is safely stored on 
disk, ready to retrieve when 
we look at that next month. 

Here's a complete listing of 
the program with The Automat- 
ic Proofreader checksums. 



AM 


10 


PRINTCHR$(147) 


GQ 


20 


DIMl5(lfl0) :PRINT" 
{SPACE} NO MORE THA 
N 100 ITEMS !":PRIN 
T"{UOWN) PRESS ANY 
KEY TO BEGIN." 


GR 


30 


GETAS: IFAS=""THEN3 



PRrNTCHRS(147) 


BQ 


40 


CQ 


50 


X=X+1: INPUT" TO DO 
'•;IS(X) 


PF 


60 


IFIS (X)=""THENX=X- 
1:GOTO80 


BF 


70 


GOT040 


FM 


80 


PRINT 


KK 


90 


F0RT=1T0X:PRINTIS( 
T) :NEXT 


GC 


10G 


input"{down}name 
(space)of list to 
save";l$:ifls="" 

THENEND 


PA 


IIG 


0PEN1,8,1,LS 


QA 


12G 


PRINT#1,X 


FR 


136 


F0RT=1T0X:PRINT#1 
,IS (T) :NEXT 


BD 


140 


CLOSEl O 




Gazette 
Index 



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Choose from three modes of opera- 
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G-17 



MACHINE LANGUAGE 



Jim Butterfield 



The asterisk signals 

the current 

woi1(ing address as 

the assembler 

wor1(s through your 

source code. 



ASSEMBLER 
TRICKS 

Most machine language mon- 
itor programs contain tiny as- 
semblers that will help you to 
write machine language 
code. As you try more ambi- 
tious coding projects, you'll 
move along to a full-scale, sym- 
bolic assembler 

The big assembler packag- 
es give you more help in cod- 
ing. Perhaps more Important, 
they allow you to save source 
code that you have v/ritten. As 
the project develops, you can 
recall this source code and ed- 
it it — adding, subtracting, or 
changing text as appropriate. 

In this column, I'll talk about 
one aspect of a symbolic as- 
sembler: the asterisk {*) char- 
acter. Most programmers will 
tell you that the asterisk 
means "here" or, more specif- 
ically, "the assembler's work- 
address pointer." 

As the assembler works 
through your source code, it as- 
signs the data it is building to 
some location in memory, As 
more data is generated, the lo- 
cation moves along to a high- 
er address. The asterisk sig- 
nals the current working ad- 
dress. Often, the asterisk Is 
used in BASIC-like assign- 
ment statements. 

You can set the working ad- 
dress to a specific value. 
Thus, the command '=$2000 
means 'assign data starting at 
address hexadecimal 2000." 
Such a command is often 
seen at the start of a source list- 
ing, and it causes the assem- 
bled program to be placed at 
the named address. Some as- 
semblers prefer to do this us- 
ing the keyword EQU for 
(equate). 

If you wanted to skip over a 
number of bytes of memory, 
you naight code something 
like *=VS. This works much 
like BASIC'S X=X+8. As the as- 
sembler does its work, it obe- 



diently hops ahead. We are 
saying to the assembler that 
we don't care what the con- 
tents of these bytes are but to 
just make room for them. 
Some assemblers prefer to do 
this using the keyword BSS 
(Block Sequential Storage). 

One of tfie benefits of a sym- 
bolic assembler, as the name 
suggests, is that certain parts 
of the program may be identi- 
fied with symbolic names, or 
labels. A large number of la- 
bels, however, can slow down 
an assembly. Programmers 
sometimes like to reduce the 
number of labels by means of 
asterisk addresses. A quick 
loop might be coded as seen 
in the following example. 

LDA MESSAGE,/ 
INX 

CMP #50D 
BNE *-6 

The branch will go back to 
the LDA instruction. You must 
be careful here because not 
all assemblers do precisely 
the same calculation. Know 
your assembler, and test it if 
you're not sure. 

A label can be attached to 
a point within a program by 
simply placing it at the left 
side of the line, such as 
LOOP LDA MESSAGE, X. 

But some programmers 
don't want to glue the label 
and the instruction together. 
They reason that they might 
want to add another instruc- 
tion at the top of this loop. If 
so, they'd need to do some 
awkward editing. They would 
prefer to use the asterisk and 
code as in the following lines. 

LOOP =* 

LDA MESSAQE,X 

The effect is the same as the 
previous single line, but the as- 
terisk makes things much 
more flexible. 

Perhaps the most elegant 
use of the asterisk is to allow 



the length of a string or data 
area to be calculated automal- 
ically. Here's the source 
code for a small program. 

120 *=S2000 

130 LDX #0 

14Q LP1 LDA MSG1,X 

150 JSR $FF02 

160 INX 

170 CPX #IVI1LEN 

180 BNE LP1 

190 LDX #0 

200 LP2 LDA IVISG2,X 

210 JSRSFFD2 

220 INX 

230 CPX #IV12LEN 

240 BNE LP2 

250 RTS 

300 MSG1 .ASC "HELLO" 

310 .BYTE SOD 

320 MILEN = *-MSG1 

330 IV1SG2 -ASC •GOODBYE" 

340 .BYTE SOD 

350 IVI2LEN = *-MSG2 

Lines 320 and 350 show 
the length-calculation trick. 
Effectively, they say to calcu- 
late the difference between 
here and the start of the mes- 
sage. The assembler will obe- 
diently calculate values of 6 
and 8 for the two string 
lengths. Later, if you wanted 
to change HELLO to GREET- 
INGS— or BON JOUR or 
GUTEN MG— just type it in, 
and the assembler will figure 
out the revised numbers for 
you. 

The above program, which 
outputs HELLO and GOOD- 
BYE, isn't too exciting as a 
type-in project, but I won't in- 
clude a BASIC version with 
POKES this time. If you want 
to try entering the above 
code and have only a simple 
(nonsymfaolic) assembler, 
you'll find the following sym- 
bol values useful. 

2002 LP1 

20D4 LP2 

2006 MSGI 

2008 M1LEN 

2012 MSG2 

2014 MZLEN O 



G-18 COMPUTE OCTOBER 1993 



The Gazette 

Productivity 

Manager 

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database without the fuss! Nothing's easier — it's a 
truly simple computerized address file. Just type in 
your data on any one of the index cards. Need to edit? 
Just use the standard Commodore editing keys. 
Finished? Just save the data to floppy What could be 
easier? 

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PROGRAMMER'S PAGE 



Randy Thompson 



Let's examine 

what it lakes 

to program oOier 

computers and 

game machines. 



G-2Q COMPUTE OCTOBER 



LOOKING OVER 
THE FENCE 

Ever wonder what it's like to 
program computers otiier 
than the 64 or 128? For start- 
ers, your machine comes with 
BASIC iristalled. but the Ami- 
ga, fvlacintosh, and MS-DOS 
clones don't. If you want to run 
BASIC on any of these ma- 
chines, you must purchase a 
separate BASIC compiler. 

The Amiga has several ver- 
sions of BASIC available. Ear- 
ly machines came with ver- 
sions of Microsoft BASIC, but 
Microsoft used some poor pro- 
gramming practices, and its 
BASIC interpreter won't work 
on current Amigas. Fortunately, 
other Amiga BASIC compilers 
are of higher quality. More im- 
portantly, these other BASICS 
are not interpreters; they are 
compilers. This means your pro- 
grams are compiled into fast- 
executing machine language. 
The Amiga also has some spe- 
cialized versions of BASIC for 
programming games. 

Many PCs are stili sold with 
a BASIC interpreter that loads 
from disk, such as GW-BASIC. 
There's even a language 
called True BASIC that's avail- 
able for the Amiga, Macintosh, 
and PC. Any program written 
in True BASIC can be run on 
any computer equipped with 
True BASIC, However, BASIC 
is rarely the programming lan- 
guage of choice these days. 

The most popular language 
now is C, and this includes its 
object-oriented offspring, 
C++. Pascal and its close rel- 
ative Modula-2 are also popu- 
lar. None of these languages 
come free with a computer. 

The one language that all 
computers must support in 
one fashion or another is ma- 
chine language. Programming 
in machine language on a 64 
or 128 requires an assembler 
(unless you prefer coding 
directly to memory through 

1993 



POKE statements or using a 
machine language monitor). 

You need an assembler to 
v/rite Amiga. Macintosh, and 
PC machine language pro- 
grams as well, Because BA- 
SIC is the operating system for 
the 64 and 128, many assem- 
blers let you use your comput- 
er's built-in BASIC editor to 
v/rite machine language pro- 
grams. You must use a text ed- 
itor to create machine lan- 
guage source code on other 
computers. 

Both the Macintosh and the 
Amiga use Motorola's 68000 
family of CPUs. This family con- 
sists of the 68000, 68010, 
68020, 68030, and 68040. 
The higher the number, the 
newer and more powerful the 
CPU. All of these CPUs have 
basically the same instruction 
set, and all support the instruc- 
tions of their lower-numbered 
siblings. These chips are in- 
credibly powerful when com- 
pared to the 6502, For exam- 
ple, a lowly 68000 has 16 reg- 
isters, each of which can hold 
a 32-bit value (any number up 
through 4,294,967,295). The 
6502's 8-bit A, X, and Y regis- 
ters, on the other hand, can 
hold a number from to 255 
only— and think what you can 
do with that! 

The Intel chips found in PCs 
are a diverse bunch. The orig- 
inal 8088 is actually less pow- 
erful than the lower-numbered 
8086 because it uses an 8-bit 
data bus while the 8086 has a 
16-bit data bus. 

The 80286, 80386, and 
80486— often referred to as 
simply the 286, 386, and 486— 
quickly replaced the older 
8088 and 8086. The 386 was 
the first of the group to have 
32-bit registers like the 68000. 
The main advantage of these 
chips is raw speed. The 486, 
for example, can run at an 
amazing 66 MHz. In contrast, 
the 6510 in a 64 runs at a 
mere 1 MHz. 

Did you know that game ma- 



chines are really computers? 
SEGA Genesis, for example, 
uses the same 68000 proces- 
sor as the Amiga 500, 

The old 8-bit Nintendo uses 
a 6502, of sorts. It's a modified 
version of that chip that's fast- 
er but contains fewer instruc- 
tions. The SNES uses a 65816 
CPU that's closely related to 
the 6502. It is, in fact, a 16-bit 
version of that chip. So. if 
you've got 64 or 128 machine 
language experience, you're 
in a good position to become 
a Nintendo programmer. 

Nintendo's Game Boy uses 
a Z80 CPU. That's the same 
microprocessor found in old 
CP/M computers and the dis- 
continued Timex-Sinclair com- 
puters. The SEGA Genesis 
has a Z80 in it as well, but it's 
mainly used to control the ma- 
chine's FM sound chip. 

Since they don't have key- 
boards and disk drives, you 
might wonder how these 
game machines are pro- 
grammed. The answer? They 
use other computers. 

Most development systems 
(as they are called) are based 
around MS-DOS computers, 
and you use what's called a 
cross compiler to write your 
code. A cross compiler is a 
compiler or assembler (hat gen- 
erates code for a machine 
that IS different from the com- 
puter you are using. For exam- 
ple, you might use a PC to 
write and assemble 68000 
code for a SEGA Genesis. 
(Some companies have even 
been known to develop 64 
code on the PC.) Youthen use 
a special hardware interface 
to download the code to the 
game machine where you can 
run it and test your game. 

With such expensive and 
specialized equipment, it's no 
wonder you don't see very 
many hobbyists hacking out 
games for the SNES or SEGA 
Genesis. Fortunately, all you 
need to program the 64 or 128 
is to own one. D 



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G-21 



GEOS 



Steve Vander Ark 



A handful of 

companies and a lot 

of devoted users 

are not about to let 

GEOS and 

die 64 slip away. 



INTO THE BREACH 

What's all this talk about GEOS 
users throwing in the towel and 
giving up Iheir 64s and 128s? 
Its not time for that. 

True, there are fewer and 
fewer magazines devoted to 
the Commodore, but that's no 
reason to call it quits. Besides, 
users just recently have start- 
ed a new magazine specifical- 
ly for GEOS. it's a very nice 
publication called geoVISION. 

While Berkeley (now called 
GEOWORKS) no longer 
writes software for 8-bit 
GEOS, users again have 
leaped into the breach and 
are turning out all kinds of 
great programs. Of course 
there are still a number of com- 
panies such as Creative Micro 
Designs, RIO Computers, The 
Soft Group, and others that 
are still coming out with sur- 
prisingly high-tech hardware 
for lowly 64s and 128s, 

OK, I hear you asking me 
what the GEOS universe wil! 
look like in a year or two. What 
is there still to look forward to? 
Here are a few things I think 
might be waiting for us not too 
far down the line. 



Gateway NT. If you follow the 
wacky world of Microsoft and 
its choke hold on the IBfvl- 
clone world, you will recognize 
that wr means "new technol- 
ogy" I think that if Jim Collette 
ever sits down with Gateway 
and pushes it to the limits, we 
could see a whole new level of 
sophistication in a basic sys- 
tem manager program. 

The concept of pseudo multi- 
tasking has already been giv- 
en life with Gateway's Switch- 
er and the task switcher in 
geoWizard. Theoretically, you 
can store as many 'contexts" 
as you have room for in your 
RAM device. Maybe those lit- 
tle-used function keys could 
be dragged into the act to let 
you choose any of up to eight 
jobs in progress. 

G-22 COMPUTE OCTOBER 1993 



Along with that, we should 
see the development of a 
print spooler, a system which 
feeds document information to 
the printer to free your comput- 
er for other uses This spooler 
uses a RAM device to store 
the data temporarily before it 
trickles out for printing on 
your 9-pin printer. 

Screen savers. Yeah, yeah, 1 
know screen savers are frivo- 
lous. I know that simple blank- 
ing can protect your monitor 
screen perfectly weli. I know 
that i don't actually need to 
see little fish or fireworks bright- 
ening up my monitor, but — 
and I hate to admit it — I love 
a good screen saver. It's a lot 
of fun to mess with them, to 
give them just the right pizazz. 
This miracle of modern comput- 
er science would almost cer- 
tainly require a RAM device to 
store the information it needs. 

Programmers. More programs 
from people like Irv Cobb and 
Paul Murdaugh (I could list a 
whole lot more people here), 
truly clever and dedicated 
GEOS programmers who just 
keep going on doing things 
once thought impossible or 
never even dreamed of at all. 
They never seem to run out of 
good ideas for GEOS utilities, 
from Irv's program to alter the 
system font to Paul's outstand- 
ing DualTop. These people 
are the cutting edge, folks. 

GeoPublish 128. No, it won't 
be called that, and it won't be 
coming from California. No. 
this eagerly awaited program 
is being developed by Mau- 
rice Randall, who lives an 
hour away from me here in 
Michigan. He's the guy who 
wrote geoSHELL. If he ever 
gets this project finished, Mau- 
rice will have made an awful 
lot of people very happy. As of 
this writing, the project was 
still a long way from comple- 
tion, though, and who knows? 



Online services. I really hate to 
say it, but I get the impression 
that America Online (Quantum- 
Link's parent company) would 
be just as happy to see Q- 
Link die. The death blow 
could have been announced 
by the freezing of the librar- 
ies — which ooourred in Febru- 
ary This problem, according 
to an inside source, could 
have been fixed quickly and 
easily had certain data been 
made available to those who 
could make the repairs. 

As the months went by no 
one could find the time to 
pass that information along, 
and the problem remained. A 
lot of users have decided the 
solution isn't worth waiting for 
and have left Q-Link. 

For me. the very thought of 
that treasure house of files 
disappearing is enough to 
make me cry. Heck, there is 
so much in those libraries that 
it will be a long time before I 
run out of things to download. 

Of course, all these avid 
Commodore users will have to 
go somewhere, and it looks 
like GEnie is where many of 
them are ending up. The Flag- 
ship (that's GEnie's Commo- 
dore support area) has rapid- 
ly growing libraries of GEOS 
files, and many of the best 
programmers liave already 
switched to GEnie to upload 
their work. Next month's col- 
umn will be a GEOS user's 
guide to GEnie; I'll give you a 
better idea of what the Flag- 
ship is like at that time. 

There are a lot of exciting 
things still happening in this 
wonderful corner of the com- 
puter universe. I'm sure that 
I'm not seeing everything 
dead on as I peer into the fu- 
ture here. Hey, I'm just guess- 
ing by what I've been hearing 
lately. What I certainly don't 
see, however. Is the end of 
GEOS on the 64/128. This sys- 
tem is just too good and we us- 
ers are just too devoted for 
GEOS to die anytime soon! D 



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No Wild, No Wildlife. 

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DIVERSIONS 



Fred D'Ignazio 



If you start to feel 

your feet slide 

from under you, hang 

on! Ybu could be 

slipping into a digital 

black bole. 



INTO A DIGITAL 
BLACK HOLE 

Black holes are collapsed 
stars whose gravitational pull 
is so strong that anything near- 
by gets sucked into them. You 
may never visit one of these 
holes in outer space, but 
you're about to be pulled into 
what I call a digital black hole. 

Every day on the news we 
hear about industries switch- 
ing from traditional means of 
producing products (nondigi- 
tal) to a high-tech (digital) for- 
mat. Boundary lines between 
products are disappearing as 
articles race toward this digital 
black hole and begin blending 
and fusing. Here are some ex- 
amples of what I mean. 

TCI and Warner Cable Com- 
panies are workng together to 
fashion a new standard for dig- 
itizing and compressing TV sig- 
nals. The companies envision 
a marriage of computers and 
cable TV that will offer subscrib- 
ers all the TV shows and mov- 
ies ever produced, online ac- 
cess to electronic shopping 
malls, video games, electronic 
newspapers, online university 
courses, and the ability to at- 
tend meetings via TV. 

US West will invest $2.5 bil- 
lion in Time Warner's cable 
and film operations, including 
Warner Brothers' movie stu- 
dio, HBO, and cable franchis- 
es. This follows a pattern of con- 
vergence between the tele- 
phone and cable industries 
that has been developing in 
Great Britain for a decade and 
is now picking up steam in the 
U.S. The phone companies' 
powerful digital switching de- 
vices will soon connect to ca- 
ble companies' wide-band vid- 
eo pipelines and make "com- 
pu-TV-phones" a reality. 

Microsoft is teaming up 
with Hewlett-Packard, Ricoh, 
Compaq Computer, fVlinolta, 
McCaw Cellular, Canon, NEC, 
and Northern Telecom to link 



all office machines via Micro- 
soft at Work software. This pa- 
perless office would allow work- 
ers on-site and off-site to cre- 
ate and send work anywhere 
on the globe— or beyond. 

Newsweek magazine now 
publishes an Interactive News- 
week edition on tiny CD-ROfVl 
discs which fit inside a hand- 
held Sony player. Cox Enter- 
prises, publisherof the /A?/anfa 
Journal and the Atlanta Con- 
stitution, is joining BellSouth to 
create instant electronic clas- 
sified ads. news updates, 
stock quotes, sports results, 
and weather reports via tele- 
phone voice mail and mo- 
dems. Electronic newspapers, 
delivered via telephone at the 
breakfast table, are just 
around the corner. 

The proponents of these 
new technologies claim that 
fusing and linking all of our ma- 
chines into a single digital 
megamachine will make our 
lives much easier. In the 
1950s, we were told that tech- 
nology would make our lives 
easier, simpler, and more fun. 
We dreamed of more leisure 
time as laborsaving devices in 
glossy white enamel took over 
the menial household chores. 

Bong! It's 1993, and our 
lives have never been more 
complex. The machines that 
promised to become our will- 
ing slaves have become a 
new breed of round-the-clock 
taskmasters. Soon we'll enter 
the era of the "go-anywhere of- 
fice." Digital fax machines, cel- 
lular telephones, subnotebook 
computers, programmable dig- 
ital assistants, and other labor- 
saving devices will see to it 
that we're on the clock, seven 
days a week. Anyone who 
wants us will be able to dial us 
up and even do a "geodata 
fix" on us. The digital black 
hole will start by sucking up all 
the world's machines, but it 
can suck up you and me, too! 

Can you imagine the world 
in a few years when today's 



standard appliances have 
ceased to exist? This is a 
world in which the digital 
black hole has sucked every- 
thing into the floors, the walls, 
and the furniture. TVs will 
have become wallpaper, ex- 
cept that they will also be our 
telephones, our computers, 
and our newspapers and 
books. 

Much of family life will con- 
sist of people talking to and ar- 
guing over their electronic 
walls, using voice-zappers to 
split the surfaces into tiny pix- 
elated tiles of pictures inside 
pictures: sports channels, elec- 
tronic-mall channels, crime 
channels, real estate chan- 
nels, reality street channels, 
evangelical channels, well- 
ness channels, and so on. 

Video wallpaper will be so 
inexpensive that people will 
buy it for all four walls in order 
to keep the zapper arguments 
subhomicidal. Four people 
might each face a different 
wall of a room's four walls. 

If there are more than four 
people In the room, they 
could wear permanently mount- 
ed miniature earphones and 
mlnimikes in their mouths. 
This way, they could whisper 
commands to the magic 
screen on the wall and listen 
to its babble while remaining 
polite, inaudible, and insulat- 
ed from all social contact with 
family members and friends. A 
perfect evening at home will 
be spent in front of infinitely di- 
visible electronic hearths. 

This is an inevitable market 
just waiting to be digested by 
the technological juggernaut 
and the digital black hole. The 
real question is, Will this be 
progress? 

The digital black hole is out 
there, folks. It's waiting for us. 
So, if you feel your feet start to 
slide or your ears start pop- 
ping, grab onto something 
heavy and hang on. It's going 
to be one heck of a steep and 
slippery slope, folks! D 



G-24 COMPUTE OCTOBER 1993 



PROGRAMS 



COINS 



By Maurice Yanney 

Everyone enjoys finding money on a 
street; it's lil<e getting sometliing for nothi- 
ing. Of course, practically everything has 
its price, and this single-player arcade 
game for the 64 is no exception. As you 
maneuver about the screen picking up 
coins, four tanks will be shooting at you. 
Coins is written entirely in machine lan- 
guage, but it loads and runs like a BASIC 
program. To type it in, use IvlLX, our ma- 
chine language entry program. See "Typ- 
ing Aids" elsewhere in this section. 
When MLX prompts, respond with the 
following values. 

Starting address: 0BO1 
Ending address: 19D8 

Be sure to save a copy of the program 
before exiting fvlLX. 

Playing the Game 

After you load and run Coins, press the 
space bar or the joystick fire button to 
start the game. Use a joystick in port 2. 

The object of the game is to move 
about the screen gathering coins 
while doing your best to avoid the bul- 
lets fired by the tanks on each side of 
the screen. To collect a coin, just 
move over it. If you don't have a joys- 
tick, you can control the figure on the 
screen by using the I, J, K, and M 
keys to move up, left, right, and down, 
respectively. 

There are three different coins that 
appear: pennies, nickels, and dimes. 
To complete the first level, you need to 
gather 25 coins of any denomination. 
Five additional coins are needed to 
complete each subsequent level. To ad- 
vance beyond level 5, you'll have to col- 
lect 50 coins. The sum that you collect 
doesn't matter as far as advancing to 
a new level, but you do get points for 
each dime, nickel, or penny. More 
about scoring later. 

In addition to the randomly appear- 
ing coins, watch for an infrequent 
smart bomb. Smart bombs clear the 
screen of bullets and temporarily stun 
the tanks, preventing them from firing. 
When you maneuver over a smart 
bomb, you'll receive a bonus bomb 
that appears at the top of the screen, 
Smart bombs are fired by pressing the 



space bar or the fire button. At the 
start of each game you have six smart 
bombs. An extra smart bomb is award- 
ed upon successful completion of a lev- 
el, Use the smart bombs sparingly in 
the opening levels. Once you reach lev- 
el 5, the action picks up, and smart 
bombs will be very helpful. 

As the tanks fire, bullets move from 
one end of the screen to the other. If a 
bullet hits you, you lose a player. If a 
bullet hits a coin, the coin disappears. 

As if dodging bullets weren't hard 
enough, you must also race the clock. 
A time bar appears at the bottom of 
the screen. If time expires, you lose a 
player. When you lose all your players, 
the game is over. 

You start the game with one player 
onscreen and three extras. The players 
remaining are displayed at the bottom 
of the screen. For each 10,000 points 
reached, you receive an extra player. 
For each penny you gather, you get 
100 points. A nickel will earn you 500 
points, and a dime is worth 1000 
points. You also get bonus points at 
the end of each level based on how 
much time is remaining. 

To pause the game, hold down the 
Shift key or press the Shift Lock key. 
To continue playing, release the Shift 
key or press the Shift Lock key again. 



COINS 



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6C 



OCTOBER 1993 COMPUTE G-25 



PROGRAMS 



0B11 


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0C 


01 


0FD9:4C 


02 


10 


C9 


F5 


00 


0B 


A9 


EF 


0B81 


•20 


0A 


E5 


A9 


C9 


A0 


19 


20 


A4 


0DB1 


C9 


24 


00 


03 


20 


C0 


0C 


C9 


E9 


0FE1:64 


20 


64 


17 


20 


50 


18 


4C 


2B 


0B89 


IE 


AB 


A2 


17 


A0 


00 


18 


20 


B4 


0DB9 


21 


00 


03 


20 


DE 


0C 


AD 


19 


96 


0FE9:02 


10 


C9 


F6 


00 


0B 


A9 


32 


ED 


0B9L 


0A 


E5 


A9 


98 


A3 


18 


20 


IE 


A8 


0OC1 


lA 


D0 


07 


AD 


00 


DC 


29 


10 


AE 


0FF1:20 


64 


17 


20 


5D 


IB 


4C 


02 


04 


eB99 


AB 


A9 


AB 


3D 


E7 


07 


A0 


22 


9B 


0DC9 


F0 


28 


AO 


00 


DC 


29 


0F 


AA 


70 


0FF9:10 


A9 


0A 


20 


64 


17 


20 


5D 


EA 


0BA1 


99 


9D 


07 


88 


D0 


FA 


60 


A9 


32 


0DD1 


29 


01 


00 


03 


20 


DE 


0C 


8A 


2A 


1001:18 


AC 


EF 


19 


B9 


E5 


19 


AA 


2A 


0BA9 


F3 


8D 


F6 


19 


A9 


26 


8D 


F7 


86 


0DD9 


29 


02 


D0 


03 


20 


C0 


0C 


8A 


F9 


1009:B9 


E6 


19 


AS 


20 


05 


16 


AO 


92 


0BB1 


19 


A9 


lA 


8D 


06 


lA 


A9 


ES 


AF 


0DE1 


29 


04 


00 


03 


20 


CF 


0C 


8A 


BE 


1011:00 


A9 


20 


91 


FB 


AC 


EF 


19 


44 


0BB9 


8D 


E0 


19 


A9 


03 


8D 


El 


19 


B7 


0DE9 


29 


08 


00 


0E 


20 


Bl 


0C 


4C 


CI 


X019:AE 


F5 


19 


20 


59 


0E 


20 


Bl 


28 


0BC1 


A9 


00 


8D 


DB. 


19 


3D 


DC 


19 


ED 


0OF1 


FB 


00 


AD 


19 


lA 


D0 


03 


4C 


FA 


1021:0B 


AC 


EF 


19 


AE 


F5 


19 


20 


A2 


0BC9 


8D 


DD 


19 


BD 


OE 


19 


80 


19 


A9 


0OF9 


2A 


13 


AO 


19 


lA 


F0 


03 


CE 


9E 


1029:29 


0F 


A9 


04 


80 


F8 


19 


60 


F9 


0BD1 


lA 


8D 


DF 


19 


80 


E2 


19 


3D 


90 


0E01 


19 


lA 


60 


A9 


A0 


A0 


28 


99 


48 


1031:A9 


00 


30 


F8 


19 


AO 


00 


A2 


55 


0BD9 


SB 


lA 


8D 


18 


lA 


A9 


SE 


3D 


51 


0E09 


4F 


04 


99 


FF 


03 


99 


6F 


07 


65 


1039:00 


8C 


EF 


19 


8E 


F5 


19 


20 


AA 


0BE1 


12 


lA 


8D 


15 


lA 


A9 


B0 


8D 


F0 


0E11 


33 


D0 


F4 


A9 


28 


85 


FB 


A9 


D7 


1041:87 


0F 


AO 


F8 


19 


C9 


04 


F0 


17 


0BE9 


13 


lA 


8D 


16 


lA 


A9 


00 


8D 


28 


0E19 


04 


85 


FC 


A2 


00 


A9 


A0 


A0 


EA 


1049;1A 


AC 


EF 


19 


AE 


F5 


19 


C8 


79 


0BF1 


14 


lA 


3D 


17 


lA 


A0 


0A 


99 


EC 


0E21 


00 


91 


FB 


A0 


27 


91 


FB 


18 


BA 


1051:C8 


E8 


E0 


05 


DO 


E3 


AO 


FS 


E6 


0BF9 


E5 


19 


88 


D0 


FA 


A9 


56 


80 


20 


0E29 


A5 


FB 


69 


28 


85 


FB 


A5 


FC 


2B 


1059:19 


18 


69 


01 


C9 


04 


DO 


D2 


IC 


0C01 


E3 


19 


A9 


42 


8D 


E4 


19 


60 


30 


0E31 


69 


00 


85 


FC 


E8 


E0 


15 


00 


48 


1061:4C 


70 


10 


AD 


IF 


D0 


29 


01 


30 


0C09 


AS 


00 


B9 


F9 


18 


99 


C0 


02 


F2 


0E39 


E4 


60 


AO 


00 


A2 


00 


80 


EF 


12 


1069:C9 


01 


D0 


03 


4C 


31 


10 


60 


A0 


0C11 


ca 


C0 


40 


DO 


F5 


A9 


0B 


80 


CC 


0E41 


19 


BE 


F5 


19 


20 


59 


0E 


20 


80 


1071:B9 


FA 


19 


0A 


0A 


13 


69 


09 


7D 


0C19 


F3 


07 


AD 


15 


D0 


09 


01 


80 


B0 


0E49 


Bl 


0E 


AC 


EF 


19 


AE 


F5 


19 


DE 


1079:8D 


D9 


19 


B9 


FB 


19 


0A 


0A 


F7 


0C21 


15 


D0 


A9 


01 


8D 


27 


00 


A9 


91 


0E51 


C8 


C3 


E3 


E0 


05 


D0 


E7 


60 


CA 


1081:18 


69 


19 


8D 


DA 


19 


AO 


09 


74 


0C29 


00 


3D 


IB 


D0 


60 


A0 


3F 


A9 


C2 


0E59 


20 


97 


EB 


A5 


8F 


AA 


29 


01 


5C 


1089:19 


18 


60 


F8 


19 


CD 


E3 


19 


5A 


0C31 


00 


99 


3F 


03 


99 


7F 


03 


99 


32 


0E61 


F0 


05 


A 9 


F7 


4C 


7E 


0E 


8A 


EE 


1091:90 


25 


AO 


E3 


19 


18 


69 


05 


38 


0C39 


BF 


03 


99 


BF 


2F 


88 


D0 


Fl 


50 


0E69 


29 


06 


F0 


05 


A9 


F6 


4C 


7E 


4A 


1099:CD 


D9 


19 


90 


lA 


AO 


OA 


19 


99 


0C41 


A0 


00 


A2 


00 


BD 


40 


19 


99 


B3 


0E71 


0B 


SA 


29 


3C 


F0 


05 


A9 


F5 


OS 


10A1:18 


6D 


F3 


19 


CD 


E4 


19 


90 


9E 


0C49 


40 


03 


E8 


C8 


C8 


C8 


E0 


10 


27 


0E79 


4C 


7E 


0E 


A9 


EA 


AE 


F5 


19 


CR 


10A9:0E 


AD 


E4 


19 


18 


69 


09 


CD 


B0 


ac5i 


D0 


F2 


A0 


27 


A2 


00 


BD 


60 


06 


0Eai 


9D 


F0 


19 


20 


97 


EO 


A5 


8F 


ES 


10B1:DA 


19 


90 


03 


4C 


BB 


10 


A9 


E2 


0C59 


19 


99 


C0 


2F 


BD 


70 


19 


99 


EA 


0E39 


29 


IF 


18 


69 


04 


AC 


EF 


19 


67 


10B9:00 


60 


20 


01 


15 


A9 


IE 


80 


IF 


0C61 


30 


03 


E8 


C8 


BD 


60 


19 


99 


5F 


0E91 


99 


E5 


19 


20 


97 


E0 


AA 


A5 


54 


10C1:15 


D0 


20 


44 


18 


AD 


DE 


19 


37 


0C69 


C0 


2F 


BD 


70 


19 


99 


30 


03 


9F 


0E99 


BF 


29 


0F 


13 


69 


04 


AC 


EF 


CF 


10C9:C9 


FF 


00 


06 


20 


09 


0C 


A9 


30 


0C71 


E8 


C8 


C8 


E0 


10 


D0 


DF 


A0 


7B 


0BA1 


19 


99 


E6 


19 


8A 


29 


80 


F0 


0A 


10D1:01 


60 


20 


AA 


17 


20 


04 


0E 


88 


0C79 


00 


A2 


00 


BD 


50 


19 


C8 


C8 


57 


0EA9 


06 


AE 


EF 


19 


FE 


E6 


19 


60 


2A 


10D9:20 


12 


13 


20 


FA 


12 


A9 


IF 


85 


0C81 


99 


C0 


03 


C8 


E8 


E0 


10 


00 


3F 


0EB1 


AC 


EF 


19 


B9 


E5 


19 


8D 


D8 


66 


10E1:8D 


15 


00 


20 


37 


15 


A9 


26 


Bl 


0C89 


F2 


A9 


IE 


0D 


15 


D0 


80 


15 


36 


0EB9 


19 


B9 


E6 


19 


3D 


09 


19 


A0 


E5 


10E9:8D 


F7 


19 


A9 


AO 


A2 


21 


90 


FB 


0C91 


D0 


A9 


05 


A2 


04 


9D 


27 


D0 


FC 


0EC1 


00 


CC 


EF 


19 


F0 


10 


B9 


E5 


CI 


10F1:9D 


07 


CA 


D0 


FA 


20 


59 


16 


2A 


0C99 


CA 


D0 


FA 


A9 


00 


8D 


F9 


07 


DE 


0EC9- 


19 


CD 


D8 


19 


D0 


08 


B9 


E6 


93 


10F9:20 


44 


16 


A9 


00 


30 


DP 


19 


A 7 


0CA1 


A9 


0E 


8D 


FA 


07 


A9 


0F 


8D 


FD 


0EDi 


19 


CD 


D9 


19 


F0 


4C 


C8 


C8 


CO 


1101:A9 


91 


60 


A9 


00 


80 


F8 


19 


20 


0CA9 


FB 


07 


A9 


BF 


80 


FC 


07 


60 


31 


0ED9: 


C0 


0A 


D0 


E5 


AD 


D8 


19 


OA 


5E 


1139:A0 


00 


A2 


00 


8C 


EF 


19 


8E 


B4 


0CBI 


AC 


E3 


19 


C0 


9B 


B0 


07 


C8 


BE 


0EE1 


0A 


18 


69 


09 


80 


D8 


19 


AD 


76 


1111:F5 


19 


20 


71 


10 


D0 


IE 


AD 


3D 


0CB9- 


8C 


E3 


19 


20 


ED 


0C 


60 


AC 


43 


0EE9: 


D9 


19 


0A 


0A 


18 


69 


19 


80 


41 


1119:Fe 


19 


C9 


04 


F0 


17 


AC 


EF 


A4 


0CC1 


E4 


19 


C0 


64 


BO 


07 


C8 


8C 


B0 


0EF1 


D9 


19 


AD 


D3 


19 


18 


69 


03 


83 


1121:19 


AE 


F5 


19 


C8 


C8 


E8 


E0 


E7 


0CC9 


E4 


19 


20 


ED 


0C 


60 


AC 


E3 


9C 


0EF9: 


CD 


E3 


19 


90 


24 


AO 


E3 


19 


OA 


1129:04 


D0 


El 


AD 


F8 


19 


18 


69 


5E 


0CD1 


19 


C0 


12 


90 


07 


88 


8C 


E3 


49 


0F01- 


IB 


69 


05 


CD 


08 


19 


90 


19 


68 


1131:01 


C9 


04 


DO 


DO 


60 


A9 


56 


85 


0CD9 


19 


20 


ED 


0C 


60 


AC 


E4 


19 


9D 


0F09: 


AD 


D9 


19 


13 


69 


03 


CD 


E4 


F0 


1139:80 


E3 


19 


A9 


42 


80 


E4 


19 


04 


0CE1 


C0 


29 


90 


07 


83 


8C 


E4 


19 


80 


0rll: 


19 


90 


0E 


AO 


E4 


19 


18 


69 


Al 


1141:20 


6B 


16 


A9 


00 


8D 


0C 


lA 


14 


0CE9 


20 


ED 


0C 


60 


AD 


10 


D0 


29 


80 


0F19: 


09 


CD 


D9 


19 


90 


03 


4C 


23 


48 


1149:80 


0D 


lA 


8D 


E2 


19 


A9 


01 


61 


0CF1 


IE 


80 


10 


00 


A0 


00 


AD 


E3 


CF 


0F21 


0F 


60 


20 


59 


0E 


4C 


Bl 


0E 


8B 


1151:80 


0B 


lA 


A9 


IF 


8D 


15 


DO 


05 


0CF9 


19 


18 


6D 


E3 


19 


90 


02 


A0 


40 


0F29- 


8C 


EF 


19 


3E 


F5 


19 


AD 


lA 


IF 


1159:20 


12 


13 


20 


44 


16 


20 


55 


84 


0D01 


01 


8D 


00 


D0 


93 


0D 


10 


D0 


F5 


0F31 


lA 


00 


05 


BD 


OE 


lA 


D0 


3B 


C2 


1161:09 


20 


44 


16 


A5 


C5 


C9 


3C 


0E 


0D09 


8D 


10 


D0 


AD 


E4 


19 


18 


60 


0C 


0F39 


S9 


E5 


19 


AA 


B9 


E6 


19 


A8 


BF 


1169:F0 


0A 


AD 


00 


DC 


29 


10 


F0 


D8 


0DX1- 


E4 


19 


80 


01 


D0 


60 


AD 


10 


19 


0F41- 


20 


D5 


16 


AE 


F5 


19 


BD 


FO 


13 


1171:03 


4C 


76 


11 


60 


AD 


OC 


lA 


F3 


0D19 


D0 


29 


ID 


80 


10 


D0 


A9 


IF 


93 


0F49: 


19 


A0 


00 


91 


FB 


A5 


FC 


18 


BD 


1179:00 


21 


20 


97 


E0 


A5 


8F 


29 


AF 


0D21 


8D 


02 


D0 


AD 


12 


lA 


8D 


03 


8E 


0F51: 


69 


D4 


85 


FC 


BC 


F0 


19 


A9 


5F 


1181:1F 


69 


05 


8D 


0C 


lA 


20 


97 


A7 


0D29 


D0 


60 


AD 


10 


DO 


29 


IB 


80 


69 


0F59; 


0B 


C0 


EA 


00 


02 


F0 


0A 


A9 


29 


1189:E0 


A5 


8F 


29 


07 


8D 


00 


lA 


AC 


flD3l 


10 


D0 


A9 


CE 


80 


05 


D0 


AO 


79 


0F61- 


09 


C0 


F7 


00 


02 


F0 


02 


A9 


CI 


1191:09 


04 


B0 


07 


AD 


0C 


lA 


0A 


FB 


0D39 


14 


lA 


F0 


08 


AD 


10 


D0 


09 


DA 


0F69: 


0F 


A0 


00 


91 


FB 


AC 


EF 


19 


DB 


1199:30 


0C 


lA 


20 


F2 


16 


AC 


00 


20 



G-26 COMPUTE OCTOBER 1993 



IIAI 

11A9 

llBl: 

11B9 

llCl: 

11C9: 

llDl 

11D9: 

llEl: 

11E9: 

llFl; 

11F9; 

1201: 

1209 

1211: 

1219: 

1221: 

1229: 

1231: 

1239: 

1241: 

1249: 

1251: 

1259: 

1261: 

1269: 

1271: 

1279: 

1281: 

1289: 

1291: 

1299: 

12A1: 

12A9: 

12B1: 

12B9: 

12C1: 

12C9: 

12D1: 

12D9: 

12E1: 

12E9: 

12F1: 

12F9: 

1301: 

1309: 

1311: 

1319: 

1321: 

1329: 

1331: 

1339: 

1341; 

1349: 

1351 

1359 

1361 

1369 

1371 

1379 

1381 

1389 

1391 

1399 

13A1 

13A9 

13B1 

13B9 

13C1 

13C9 



lA 88 8C 
C9 02 B0 
CE 11 C9 
ac 4C CE 
20 C0 0C 
D0 03 20 
A9 01 20 
AD IF D0 
03 20 31 
69 01 29 
03 4C 62 
A0 D0 06 
11 20 



lA 
20 



04 80 
11 C9 
4C CE 
DE 3C 



75 
29 



10 AD 
7F BD 



7B 
AA 17 20 
20 12 13 
20 44 16 
20 0A E5 
IE RB A0 
0R E5 A9 
CD BD A2 
0A E5 A9 
AB A9 00 
:1A AD F7 
:20 DE 17 
:F0 42 18 
:8D 37 lA 
:8D 08 lA 
:20 0A E5 
:1A 20 CD 
:00 8D DF 
:17 A9 32 
:19 F0 03 
:16 4C 59 
:8D D8 19 
:F5 A2 21 
:CA D0 FA 
:0E A9 56 
:8D E4 19 
:17 A9 15 
:19 18 69 
:88 D0 F6 
:8D F7 19 
:8D 15 D0 
:18 A9 20 
:19 D0 FA 
:A0 0A 88 
:60 A9 20 
:1R D0 FA 
:A0 0A 88 
:60 A9 7D 
: lA D0 01 
:22 18 20 
;A2 03 A9 
:E0 FF D0 
:19 ED E0 
:DC 19 ED 
:90 14 18 
:8D E0 19 
:8D El 19 
:00 A2 00 
:1A A0 00 
:8E F5 19 
:1A 09 FA 
:19 B9 E6 
:FB 19 DO 
:B9 FB 19 
:20 A0 00 
: 20 Bl 0E 
:19 20 29 
:00 D0 06 



11 
20 
16 
04 



A9 00 
A0 OD 
A9 84 
lA A2 
00 AE 
0A A0 
92 A0 
8D 07 
19 C9 
AD F7 
AD 07 
AD 09 
A2 BA 
AD 8 
SO 20 

19 A9 
80 08 

20 06 
12 A2 
20 06 
A9 AH 
20 AA 
BD E3 
20 59 
8D 06 
05 C9 
8D 36 
20 5D 
20 ED 
A2 05 
20 75 
99 E5 
A2 04 
20 62 
99 FA 
8D 19 



60 
12 



7D 9D 
F6 60 

19 BD 
El 19 
AD E0 
AD El 

20 30 
8C 09 
A2 30 
B9 E5 
19 D0 

19 AC 
4C B9 
A3 20 
91 FB 
AC EF 
0F AC 

20 9C 



AD 0D 
Bl 0C 
06 20 

04 D0 
11 C9 
20 B0 
20 ED 
C9 01 
E2 19 
E2 19 
A2 07 

16 4C 
62 11 
20 FA 
BD 15 
A2 09 
A0 19 
09 18 
DD 19 
0F 18 
19 20 
lA 3D 

05 F0 
19 C9 
lA 69 
lA 69 
A0 16 
lA AE 
22 16 
01 20 
19 AD 

17 20 

16 A9 

17 CA 
90 90 

17 20 
19 A9 
16 20 
lA AC 
33 F0 
lA A9 

18 A9 
0C 4C 
CA 9D 
0F A9 

19 00 
CA 9D 
09 A9 

19 D0 
lA AD 
F0 15 

20 55 
3E lA 
38 AD 
D8 19 
00 08 
19 69 
19 69 
13 60 
lA 8E 
8C EF 

19 AC 
5A AC 
09 lA 
FA 19 
05 16 

20 59 
19 AE 
09 lA 
09 4C 



lA 01 
4C D3 
CF A6 

06 E5 
05 BD 
16 5F 
00 45 
D0 49 
18 F7 
F0 39 
C9 D5 
62 12 
23 B4 
12 85 
00 F7 
18 48 
20 28 
20 86 
20 48 
20 3A 
IE 0A 

08 4A 
4C 0F 
05 BF 
0A E9 
00 AF 
18 E2 

07 D4 
A9 AF 
64 94 
DF 31 
44 F9 
03 F0 
D0 E2 
07 F5 
4 CE 
42 14 
BE 35 
DD 37 
03 0E 
26 48 
IF BS 
07 7D 
F0 42 
00 84 
FA DC 

02 88 
00 6C 
FA 90 

18 17 
20 CD 

09 68 
CA AA 
DB 84 
AD DC 

19 D7 
E8 D9 

03 05 
AS 3F 
0A E3 
19 32 
09 29 
EF 65 
09 C0 
A A 31 
A9 87 
0E 4A 
F5 20 
C0 11 
E9 72 



13D1: 


13 


CS 


02 


D0 


06 


20 


AE 


09 


16 


1601:04 


4C 


02 


16 


8D 


01 


04 


A9 


28 


13D9: 


4C 


E9 


13 


C0 


04 


D0 


06 


20 


9E 


1609:13 


80 


04 


04 


A9 


00 


8D 


05 


50 


13E1: 


C0 


09 


4C 


E9 


13 


20 


D2 


09 


9A 


1611:D4 


A9 


F0 


8D 


06 


D4 


20 


02 


8F 


13E9: 


20 


B9 


15 


A0 


0A 


4C 


FA 


13 


C5 


1619:16 


A9 


4B 


8D 


08 


19 


4C 


06 


06 


13F1: 


AC 


EF 


19 


AE 


F5 


19 


C8 


C8 


E6 


1621:17 


A9 


58 


8D 


01 


04 


A9 


81 


57 


13F9: 


£8 


C0 


0A 


DO 


88 


AC 


09 


lA 


36 


1629:8D 


04 


04 


A9 


09 


8D 


05 


D4 


AF 


1401: 


AE 


0A 


lA 


C8 


C8 


E8 


E0 


04 


82 


1631:A9 


F0 


80 


36 


D4 


A9 


0F 


80 


79 


1409: 


F0 


03 


4C 


7C 


13 


60 


AD 


FF 


31 


1639:18 


D4 


A9 


F3 


8D 


D8 


19 


4C 


39 


1411: 


19 


0A 


0A 


0A 


18 


69 


2E 


CD 


BA 


1641:06 


17 


63 


A2 


19 


A9 


00 


90 


79 


1419: 


12 


lA 


F0 


14 


90 


09 


EE 


12 


C8 


1649:FF 


D3 


CA 


D3 


FA 


60 


20 


D5 


40 


1421: 


lA 


EE 


12 


lA 


4C 


17 


0D 


CE 


9D 


1651:16 


A9 


20 


A0 


00 


91 


FB 


60 


9F 


1429: 


12 


lA 


CE 


12 


lA 


4C 


17 


0D 


19 


1659:20 


3B 


0E 


A9- 


03 


20 


75 


0F 


3B 


1431: 


CE 


10 


lA 


60 


A0 


00 


AD 


14 


82 


1661:20 


55 


09 


20 


62 


09 


23 


89 


17 


1439: 


lA 


F0 


02 


A0 


30 


AD 


13 


lA 


EF 


1669:0D 


60 


A2 


17 


A0 


09 


18 


23 


73 


1441; 


4A 


8D 


D8 


19 


98 


13 


6D 


D3 


77 


i671:0A 


E5 


A9 


99 


A0 


19 


20 


IE 


B2 


1449: 


19 


8D 


D8 


19 


AD 


FC 


19 


0A 


AB 


1679:AB 


60 


A2 


17 


A0 


09 


18 


23 


D2 


1451 


0A 


18 


69 


0A 


CD 


DB 


19 


F0 


47 


1681:0A 


£5 


A 9 


Bl 


AO 


19 


20 


IE 


44 


1459 


2A 


90 


14 


AD 


13 


lA 


18 


69 


B2 


1689:AB 


60 


20 


AA 


17 


20 


AS 


0B 


E7 


1461 


02 


8D 


13 


lA 


AD 


14 


lA 


69 


4D 


1691:20 


70 


0B 


20 


04 


0E 


20 


5D 


46 


1469: 


00 


8D 


14 


lA 


4C 


2B 


0D 


AD 


EF 


1699:13 


A9 


IF 


80 


15 


D0 


20 


ED 


13 


1471- 


13 


lA 


38 


E9 


02 


BD 


13 


lA 


D5 


16A1:0C 


23 


59 


16 


A9 


20 


Ag 


lA 


91 


1479- 


AD 


14 


lA 


E9 


00 


BD 


14 


lA 


D7 


16A9:99 


34 


04 


88 


D3 


FA 


60 


20 


0C 


1481 


4C 


2B 


0D 


CS 


0F 


lA 


60 


AD 


78 


16B1:E4 


09 


20 


19 


0A 


23 


4E 


0A 


9F 


1489- 


01 


lA 


0A 


0A 


0A 


18 


69 


2E 


4C 


16B9:20 


83 


0A 


23 


62 


09 


4C 


78 


62 


1491 


CD 


15 


lA 


F0 


14 


90 


09 


EE 


IC 


16C1:13 


A9 


0F 


3D 


18 


04 


A9 


08 


CO 


1499 


15 


lA 


EE 


15 


lA 


4C 


4C 


0D 


A9 


1609:8D 


D3 


19 


23 


06 


17 


A9 


05 


FC 


14A1 


CE 


15 


lA 


CE 


15 


lA 


4C 


4C 


9C 


16D1:3D 


DF 


19 


60 


8A 


85 


FB 


A9 


Fl 


14A9 


00 


CE 


11 


lA 


60 


A0 


00 


AD 


33 


16D9:04 


85 


FC 


00 


00 


F0 


11 


18 


13 


14B1 


17 


lA 


F0 


02 


A0 


80 


AD 


16 


A2 


16E1:A5 


FB 


69 


28 


35 


FB 


A5 


FC 


F3 


14B9 


lA 


4A 


8D 


DB 


19 


98 


18 


6D 


89 


16E9:69 


00 


85 


FC 


83 


4C 


DC 


16 


90 


14C1 


D8 


19 


8D 


D8 


19 


AD 


FA 


19 


6A 


16F1:60 


AD 


DD 


19 


09 


05 


B0 


08 


D2 


14C9 


0A 


0A 


18 


69 


0A 


CD 


DB 


19 


65 


16F9:A9 


C0 


BD 


08 


19 


4C 


06 


17 


37 


14D1 


F0 


2A 


90 


14 


AO 


16 


lA 


18 


62 


1701:A9 


04 


3D 


D8 


19 


69 


01 


00 


B9 


14D9 


69 


02 


8D 


16 


lA 


AD 


17 


lA 


lA 


1709:FC 


EE 


DB 


19 


AD 


08 


19 


00 


Fl 


14E1 


69 


00 


8D 


17 


lA 


40 


68 


0D 


CI 


1711:F4 


60 


38 


A9 


OF 


ED 


D8 


19 


6E 


14E9 


AD 


16 


lA 


33 


E9 


02 


8D 


16 


BD 


1719:8D 


DA 


19 


A9 


27 


ED 


D9 


19 


40 


14F1 


lA 


AD 


17 


lA 


E9 


00 


8D 


17 


98 


1721:0D 


DA 


19 


90 


3D 


C3 


38 


A9 


DF 


14F9 


lA 


4C 


63 


0D 


CE 


0E 


lA 


60 


63 


1729:E7 


ED 


DB 


19 


8D 


DA 


19 


A9 


27 


1501 


A9 


00 


8D 


D9 


19 


A9 


00 


A0 


5F 


1731:03 


EO 


D9 


19 


3D 


OA 


19 


90 


BF 


1509 


40 


99 


BF 


02 


88 


D0 


FA 


AC 


FB 


1739:29 


C8 


38 


A9 


63 


ED 


D3 


19 


60 


1511 


D9 


19 


A2 


00 


BD 


F9 


18 


99 


62 


1741;8D 


DA 


19 


A9 


30 


ED 


09 


19 


2F 


1519 


C0 


02 


C8 


S3 


C0 


3F 


D0 


F4 


65 


1749:0D 


DA 


19 


90 


15 


C8 


38 


A9 


06 


1521 


AD 


D9 


19 


0A 


0A 


20 


05 


16 


4D 


1751:09 


ED 


D3 


19 


80 


OA 


19 


A9 


DF 


1529 


AD 


D9 


19 


18 


69 


03 


8D 


D9 


91 


1759:00 


EO 


D9 


19 


3D 


OA 


19 


90 


66 


1531 


19 


C9 


3F 


D0 


D0 


60 


A9 


56 


01 


1761:31 


08 


60 


80 


08 


19 


AD 


3B 


BB 


1539 


BD 


E3 


19 


A9 


42 


80 


E4 


19 


0C 


1769:1A 


00 


3D 


AD 


DB 


19 


13 


6D 


24 


1541 


A9 


3C 


3D 


09 


19 


20 


ED 


0C 


CF 


1771:DB 


19 


8D 


DB 


19 


AD 


DC 


19 


95 


1549 


A9 


00 


A0 


40 


99 


BF 


02 


83 


B8 


1779:69 


00 


8D 


DC 


19 


A2 


18 


AO 


FF 


1551 


D3 


FA 


AC 


D9 


19 


A2 


00 


BD 


E6 


1781:01 


AD 


DB 


19 


BD 


D3 


19 


AD 


58 


1559 


F9 


18 


99 


C0 


02 


C8 


E8 


00 


SB 


1789:00 


19 


BD 


D9 


19 


20 


13 


17 


42' 


1561 


. 3F 


D0 


F4 


AD 


D9 


19 


3A 


20 


40 


1791:18 


20 


0A 


E5 


A9 


01 


35 


07 


97 


1569 


05 


16 


AD 


D9 


19 


F0 


09 


38 


C5 


1799:AD 


DO 


19 


AE 


DB 


19 


23 


CD 


35 


1571 


:E9 


03 


80 


09 


19 


4C 


49 


15 


42 


17A1:BD 


A9 


00 


85 


C7 


20 


4E 


13 


DF 


1579 


.60 


AD 


E2 


19 


29 


07 


D3 


19 


4D 


17A9;60 


A0 


00 


A9 


20 


99 


78 


04 


27 


1581 


:A9 


90 


80 


01 


D4 


A9 


81 


8D 


44 


17B1:99 


00 


05 


99 


00 


06 


99 


98 


CA 


1589 


:04 


D4 


A9 


0F 


80 


05 


04 


A9 


E4 


17B9:06 


08 


D0 


Fl 


60 


AC 


DD 


19 


E0 


1591 


:F3 


80 


06 


D4 


A9 


09 


80 


18 


4A 


1701:C8 


8C 


DD 


19 


A2 


18 


AO 


24 


9F 


1599 


:D4 


20 


F2 


16 


20 


44 


16 


60 


94 


1709:18 


20 


0A 


ES 


A9 


01 


85 


07 


OF 


15A1 


:A9 


05 


BD 


01 


D4 


A9 


81 


3D 


81 


17D1:A9 


00 


AE 


DD 


19 


20 


CD 


BD 


2B 


15A9 


:04 


D4 


A9 


09 


8D 


05 


D4 


A9 


A4 


17D9:A9 


00 


85 


C7 


60 


AC 


F6 


19 


C6 


15B1 


:F0 


80 


06 


D4 


20 


02 


16 


60 


5E 


17E1:88 


8C 


F6 


19 


C0 


EA 


DO 


10 


4B 


15B9 


:A9 


37 


80 


01 


D4 


A9 


83 


3D 


2A 


17E9:A9 


F3 


8D 


F6 


19 


AE 


F7 


19 


97 


15C1 


:04 


D4 


A9 


F0 


8D 


05 


D4 


A9 


3B 


17F1:CA 


3E 


F7 


19 


E0 


05 


F0 


OD 


C3 


15C9 


:0F 


80 


06 


04 


20 


C2 


16 


60 


85 


17F9:AC 


F7 


19 


AD 


F6 


19 


C9 


F3 


IE 


15D1 


:A9 


C8 


80 


01 


D4 


A9 


13 


3D 


C5 


1801:F0 


03 


99 


98 


07 


60 


AO 


0B 


47 


15D9 


:04 


04 


A9 


FF 


8D 


05 


D4 


A9 


44 


1809: lA 


D3 


15 


AC 


18 


lA 


00 


lA 


AC 


15E1 


:0F 


80 


06 


D4 


20 


C2 


16 


A9 


E6 


1811:F0 


0E 


08 


8C 


18 


lA 


A9 


EA 


86 


15E9 


:FA 


80 


D8 


19 


4C 


06 


17 


A9 


F3 


1819:99 


34 


04 


A9 


0B 


99 


34 


08 


3E 


15F1 


:64 


80 


01 


D4 


A9 


13 


8D 


04 


D7 


1821:60 


AC 


18 


lA 


F0 


08 


A9 


20 


6C 


i5F9 


:D4 


A9 


E3 


BD 


05 


D4 


8D 


06 


EA 


1829:99 


34 


04 


CE 


18 


lA 


60 


20 


AA 



OCTOBER 1993 COMPUTE G-27 



PROGRAMS 



1831 


:D1 


15 


AC 


DE 


19 


C0 


09 


F0 


El 


1839 


:09 


C8 


8C 


DE 


19 


A9 


F4 


99 


92 


1841 


:D5 


07 


60 


20 


05 


16 


AC 


DE 


E4 


1849 


:19 


F0 


08 


A9 


20 


AC 


DE 


19 


68 


1851 


:99 


D5 


07 


C0 


FF 


F0 


04 


88 


05 


1859 


:8C 


DE 


19 


50 


AD 


0B 


lA 


D0 


4F 


1861 


:35 


38 


AD 


06 


lA 


F0 


2F 


E9 


2D 


1869 


:01 


8D 


06 


lA 


C9 


63 


D0 


05 


62 


1871 


;A9 


A0 


8D 


D0 


07 


C9 


09 


D0 


9F 


1879 


.05 


A9 


A0 


8D 


CF 


07 


A2 


18 


7B 


1881 


:A0 


0E 


18 


20 


0A 


E5 


A9 


01 


C6 


1889 


.85 


C7 


a9 


03 


AE 


06 


lA 


20 


8 5 


1891 


!CD 


BD 


A9 


00 


85 


C7 


60 


12 


SB 


1899 


20 


54 


49 


4D 


45 


3A 


0D 


12 


2C 


18A1 


20 


30 


30 


30 


30 


30 


30 


23 


B9 


18A9 


43 


4F 


49 


4E 


53 


3A 


20 


23 


41 


18B1 


20 


12 


20 


4D 


45 


4E 


3A 


92 


B9 


18B9 


20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


23 


E9 


18C1 


20 


12 


20 


4C 


45 


56 


3A 


20 


67 


18C9 


20 


20 


00 


00 


80 


C0 


E0 


F3 


CB 


18D1 


F8 


FC 


FE 


FF 


18 


24 


18 


24 


43 


18D9 


66 


BD 


24 


24 


3C 


7E 


Dl 


D5 


C8 


18E1 


D5 


Dl 


7E 


3C 


3C 


7E 


C3 


CF 


38 


13E9 


F3 


C3 


7E 


3C 


3C 


76 


E7 


F7 


IC 


18F1 


F7 


F7 


62 


3C 


03 


0C 


30 


C0 


95 


18F9 


00 


3C 


00 


00 


42 


00 


00 


81 


CC 


1901 


00 


00 


A5 


00 


00 


81 


00 


00 


ED 


1909 


42 


00 


90 


24 


00 


00 


18 


00 


CE 


1911 


00 


7E 


00 


00 


42 


00 


00 


DB 


D0 


1919 


00 


01 


C3 


80 


03 


5A 


C0 


02 


11 


1921 


42 


40 


00 


7E 


00 


00 


24 


00 


B4 


1929 


00 


24 


00 


00 


24 


00 


00 


24 


A9 


1931 


00 


00 


66 


00 


00 


00 


00 


01 


31 


1939 


3A 


74 


F2 


FE 


FE 


7C 


38 


F0 


3F 


1941 


F0 


FS 


FS 


FC 


FC 


FF 


E0 


E0 


A3 


1949 


FF 


FC 


FC 


F8 


F8 


F0 


F0 


0F 


66 


1951 


0F 


IF 


IF 


3F 


3F 


FF 


07 


07 


B9 


1959- 


FF 


3F 


3F 


IF 


IF 


0F 


0F 


FF 


88 


1961: 


FF 


FF 


FF 


FE 


7F 


FE 


7F 


3E 


BS 


1969: 


7C 


0E 


70 


02 


40 


02 


40 


02 


18 


1971: 


40 


02 


40 


0E 


70 


3E 


7C 


FE 


Al 


1979: 


7F 


FE 


7F 


FF 


FF 


FF 


FF 


8E 


A9 


1981: 


81 


93 


00 


92 


45 


4E 


44 


20 


8E 


1989: 


4F 


46 


20 


4C 


45 


56 


45 


4C 


18 


1991: 


00 


42 


4F 


4E 


55 


53 


3A 


00 


8F 


1999: 


12 


50 


52 


45 


53 


53 


20 


53 


03 


19A1: 


50 


41 


43 


45 


20 


4F 


52 


20 


0C 


19A9: 


42 


55 


54 


54 


4F 


4E 


92 


00 


FA 


19B1: 


12 


20 


20 


20 


20 


54 


4F 


20 


00 


19B9: 


S3 


54 


41 


52 


54 


20 


47 


41 


EA 


19C1: 


4D 


4 5 


20 


20 


20 


20 


92 


00 


98 


19C9: 


12 


53 


4D 


41 


52 


54 


20 


42 


FD 


19D1: 


4F 


4D 


42 


53 


3A 


92 


00 


00 


98 



Maurice Yanney is a frequent contrib- 
utor Some of his programs are Brick 
Layer, Umbrellas, and Cats & Mice. He 
lives in Lebanor), Pennsylvania. 

NAME MACHINE 

By Brent Spurlock 

Name Machine is a utility that lets you al- 
phabetize lists of peoples' names or oth- 
er items. To make the job easy for you, 
you can enter names in either first-name 
or last-name order, and the program wifl 

G-28 COMPUTE OCTOBEH 1993 



alphabetize the names by the last 
name. You can then print out the names 
in various formats, including first-name or 
Jast-name order, The program also lets 
you print the list in columns. 

Other features include the ability to 
save and (oad files and to handle items 
other than names, such as song titles, 
books, videos, and so on. The program 
is written to be as user friendly and 
crashproof as possible. Just be sure 
that your printer is on and ready when 
you're set to print. 

Typing It In 

Name f^achine is written entirely in BA- 
SIC. To help avoid typing errors, enter 
the program with The Automatic Proof- 
reader. See "Typing Aids" elsewhere in- 
this section. Be sure to save a copy of 
the program before you try to run it. 

When you run Name fVlachine, you'll 
see the main menu and its seven choic- 
es. Choices include Enter, Edit, Print, 
Save, Load, Choose Format, and 
Erase All Names. 

Before you alphabetize a list of 
names, you must first decide on a for- 
mat for entering them. By selecting 
Choose Format, you'll see three op- 
tions: Firs! name Last name; Last 
name, First name; and No names. The 
first two choices let you select which- 
ever way is easier for you to enter 
names, either with the first or last 
name first. In either of these formats, 
the program will still alphabetize the 
list by last names. 

The third choice allows you to enter 
items that are not names of people. 
These may be song titles or any other 
items you might lil<e. 

The current format is shown on the 
main menu under the Choose Format 
choice. The default format is First 
name Last name. After you've selected 
a format, select Enter from the main 
menu to begin entering your names. 

To enter a name, type it as indicat- 
ed by the prompt and then press Re- 
turn. The prompt states the current for- 
mat, and the current record number is 
at the top of the screen. To exit to the 
main menu, type M followed by Return. 
As a shortcut, you may go directly to 
the edit menu by typing E foliowed by 
Return. 

To edit or view the names, select Ed- 
it from the main menu. The names will 



be displayed up to 20 at a time. If the 
list is longer than 20 names, press Re- 
turn to continue listing. To return to the 
main menu, press M 

To edit a name, enter the number be- 
side that name and press Return. The 
name will be shown followed by a 
prompt to reenter the name correctly. 
Type the name as you would like it. If 
you would like to delete the name, 
type D followed by a Return. 

To print the list of names, select 
Print from the main menu. You will be 
asked if you want the first or last name 
printed first. Press either F or L. You'll 
then be asked whether on not you 
want the names numbered. You'll then 
be asked if you are using single 
sheets or continuous paper. 

You'll then be asked how many spac- 
es you want between names. You can 
have up to three spaces between 
each name. If your list is long enough 
to print more than one page, you'll be 
asked whether you want it printed in 
two columns. 

The final prompts asks for a list title. 
If you want one, enter a title and press 
Return. If any of your choices are 
wrong, press Q to quit and return to 
the main menu, fvlake sure the printer 
is on and the paper is ready and then 
press any key to print. 

To save or load a file, select the op- 
tion from the main menu and then 
type in the filename. The filename can 
contain up to 15 characters. If you 
change your mind, enter Mto return to 
the menu. Any disk errors will be dis- 
played on the screen, and you'll be giv- 
en a prompt to start over. 

To erase the names from a list, se- 
lect Erase Ail Names from the menu. 
You will be asked if you are sure. Be 
careful with this option; once the 
names have been erased, they cannot 
be recovered. 

NAME MACHINE 

MS 10 REM COPYRIGHT 1993 - COM 
PUTE PUBLICATIOHS INTL t, 
TD - ALL RIGHTS RESERVED 

RF 20 RT=0:FT=1:FT5 (1) ="FIRST 
(SPACE)NAME LAST NAHE":F 
T$(2)="LAST NAME, FIRST 
CSPACE)NAME" 

EE 30 FTS (3)="AS IS" 

KD 40 R$=CHRS (13) :NU=1:DIMNAS( 
350) ,OG$(350) :POKE53280, 
15:P0KE532ai,15:P0KE646, 



BH 52 
PP 55 



KP 


60 


DF 


61 


RK 


62 


XF 


63 


FH 


64 


JA 


70 


AJ 


80 


PP 


lee 



XA 50 PRINT'MCLR} {12 SPACES} 
{ YE L}iAj**** ********** 

XM 51 PRINT" *********** {W> 

{PUR} HAME { SHIFT-SPACE} MA 

CHIHE [YEL}{Q> ********** 

*";CHR$(14) 

PRINT"(12 SPACES}iZ} **** 

PRINT" (2 DOWnJ pLEASE EHT 

sr(shift-space Tn"umber 

tshift -space} of 

{ sh i ft -s pace } selection 

CBLU}"R5R5 

PRINT"1. . . ENTER" R$R5; "2, 

..EDIT"R$ 

PRINT"3. , , PRINT"R5R$"4. . 

.£AVE"RSRS"5. . .LOAD"R$R$ 

"6... ERASE ALL NAMES" 

PRINTRS " 7. . .CHANGE _I_NPUT 

FORMAT" 
IP FT=3 THEN PRINT" 
{4 SPACES} (NO NAMES) "sGO 
TO 70 
PRINT "{4 SPACES} ("FTS(F 

m \ tl V It 

GETA$i IFAS<"1"0RAS>"7"TH 

EN70 

A = VAL(A$) :OtIA GOTO 100,3 

00,600,800,930,1000,1100 

E=0:PRINT"{CLR| [YEL}"TA 

B(13) "<A} *********** {S> 
II 

KD ini PRINTTAB (13) "- {PUR}NAH 
E #"NU TAB(25) "(YEL}-" 

SS ld2 PRINT"{YEL}{40 T}" 

FX 103 PRINT"{BLU)TYPE {PUR}M 
{BLU3 to EXIT TO MAIN H 
ENO" 

MH 104 PRINT"TYPE {PUR}E{BLU} 
{SPACeTfOR EDIT MENU" 

BF 1(15 PRINT "{PrjR}"r3 D0WH} EHTE 
R { SH I FT-S PACE } NAME ("FT 
S(FT)") "R$"{BLLfTTDOWN}? 
{@>";:d5="" 

GJ 110 GOSaBl300 

KQ 130 IFA$=""THEN100 

CF 131 IFA$="M"ORA$="M"ORA$="M 

ENU"THEN280 
QK 132 IFA$="D"ORAS="D"THEN 50 


BF 133 IF E=l THEN GOSUB 290 
CH 134 IF A9="E" OR A$="E" OR 

{SPACE}AS="EDIT" THEN R 

T=l:GOTO3a0 
BC 135 0G$=A5 
XF 136 IF FT=3 THEN NAS=A$:GOT 

0200 
QH 138 IF FT=2 THEM 170 
DE 140 A=LEN{A$) :C=A:B=0 
RC 145 IF MIDS (A5,A,l)=" " THE 

N 160 
AF 150 A=A-1;B=B+1:1FA=0THENNA 

$=AS:GOTO200 
FA 155 G0TO145 
DR 160 B?=RIGHTS (AS,B) :C$=LEFT 



$(AS,C-B) ;NAS=B5+" , "+C 

$:GOTO200 
PK 170 A=LEN(A$) :C=A:B=i 
FP 175 IF MID$(AS,B,1)= "," TH 

EN 190 
XG 180 IF B=A THEN NA$=A$;GOTO 

200 
DX 185 B=B+1:GOT0175 
AM 190 B$=RIGHT${A$,C-B) :CS=LE 

FTS (AS, (B-1) ) :0GS = B5+" 

{SPACE}"+C$:NA$=AS 
EF 200 D=l 

KM 205 REM PRINTLENHRS (142) 
JQ 210 IFD>NUTHENNA$ (NU) =NAS:0 

G$(NU)=OGS:GOTO260 
KA 220 IFNAS>NAS (D)THEND=D+1:G 

OTO210 
EB 230 B=NU:FORI»lTONU-D 
FQ 240 NA$ (B) =NA${B-1) :0G5(B) = 

0G5(B-1) :B=b-1:neXT 

SP 250 NA$ (D) =NA5:0GS (D) =0GS 
GP 260 NU=NU+1:PRINTCHR$ (14) : I 

FE=1THEN458 
AB 270 GOTO100 
KJ 280 IFE=1THENE=0:GOTO458 
EC 282 IFRT=1THENRT=0:GOTO100 
CH 28 5 GOTO 50 
QM 290 NA9(C)=NA$ (C+l) :OG$(C)= 

0G$(C+1) : IFC<NU THEN C= 

C+1:GOTO290 
MS 298 NU=NU-1: RETURN 
XM 300 A=l 
RE 304 PRINT"{CLR} {6 SPACES} 

{PUR} PLEASE 

[SHI FT- SPACE} SELECT 

(SHI FT-S PACE} NUMBER 

{SHIFT-SPACE}TO 

( SH I FT-S PACE} EDIT (YEL}" 
GC 305 PRINT"{5 SPACES} t30 T> 

{BLU}" 
AE 306 IF NU<=20 THEN 309 
CS 308 PRINT" HIT (PUR] RETURN 

(BLU 5 TO {SHIFT -SPACE} CO 

NTI_NUETsH I FT -S PACE } LI_ST 

ING " 
FM 309 PRINT"TYPE (PUR}M{BLU} 

(SPACeTtO EXIT TO MAIN 

(SPACE)HENU" 
JS 310 FORI=1TO20 
QH 320 IFA<=9THENPRINT" ";A;NR 

S (A) :A=A+l:GOT0327 
FB 325 PRINTA;NAS (A) :A=A+1:C=0 
XB 327 NEXT:C=0 
DQ 330 PRINT"? ■f@J";:D$="" 
BX 331 GETZ$: IFZ$=""THEN331 
RR 332 IFZS=CHR$(13)0RZS=CHRS ( 

141)THENA$=D$:GOTO340 
AX 333 IFLEN(D$)=0ANDZ$=CHRS (2 

0)THEN331 
GP 334 IFZS=CHRS(2fl)THEND$=LEF 

T$(DS,LEN(DS) -1) : PRINT" 

{LEFT} (LEFT}"ZS"<@)-"; 
SS 335 IFZS<" "0RZS>CHR9 (130)A 

NDZ$<CHR$(160)THEN331 
PX 336 IFLEN(ZS)>3THEN331 
CK 338 IF ZS="M" OR ZS="M" OR 

(SPACE3zS="HENO"THEN28 2 



JG 339 D9=D$+Z$:PRINT"{LEFT}"Z 
5"{@}";:GOT0331 

PG 340 IF A5=""THEN370 

PE 350 B=VAL(AS) 

QE 355 IFB<=0ORB>=NUTHENFORI=0 
TOLEN{A$) :PRINT"{LEFT} 
{SPACE} {LEFT}"; : NEXT: PR 
INT"{@>"; :D$="":GOT0331 

BJ 360 GOTO400 

HA 370 IFA>=NUTHENA=l:GQT03a4 

KQ 3S0 GOTO 304 

AX 398 GOT0134 

RF 400 PRINT"{CLR}{3 D0WN}TYPE 
(PUR5D{BLU} TO DELETE- 

(spaceTname" 

CR 410 PRINT"TYPE (PUR}«(BLU} 

(SPACETtO return TO MEN 

U" 
QX 420 PRINT"{2 DOWN}OLD 

(SHI FT -SPACE} ENTRY — "NA 

$(B) 
SS 430 PRINT" {down} (pur) TYPE 

{SHIFT-SPACE}IN 

{SHIFT-SPACE} NEW 

(SHIFT-SPACE) ENTRY (LAS 

T NAME, FIRST NAME) 

{BLU3"R$RS"? t@}"; 
RS 450 E=1:Q=NU:TF=FT:D9="":C= 

B 
DG 453 IF FT=3 THEN 110 
DC 455 FT=2:GOTO110 
PJ 458 NU=Q:FT=TF:E=0:IF RT=1 

{SPACE}THEN RT=0:GOTO10 


PA 459 GOTO300 
FH 500 PRINTRSRS"ARE YOU SURE? 

(Y/N) " 
QC 510 GET A5:IFAS=""THEN519 
AK 520 IFA5="N"0RA$="N"THEN E= 

0:KU=Q;FT=TF: GOTO 300 
JC 530 GOSUB290:GOTO300 
ES 600 PRINT" fCLR} {DOWN} {POR} 

(5 SPACES }TYPE M TO RET 

URN TO MAIN MENUJYEL}" 
HF 605 paiNT"{5 SPACES}{29 T} 

(BLU} 
DH 608 PRINT" (DOWN}PRINT (PUR) 

F(BLU}IRST OR {PUR}L 

TbLU}AST name FIRST?"; 
XB 610 GET AS:IPA9<>"F"ANDA$<> 

"F"ANDA5<>"L"ANDA$<>"L" 

ANDA$<>"H"ANDA$<>"M"THE 

N 610 
KK 615 IFAS="M"ORA$="H"THEN50 
RH 620 PRINTAS:A=1:IFA$="F"0RA 

$="F"THEN A=0 
QK 626 PRINTRS"NUMBER LIST OF 

(SPACE 3 NAMES? (Y/N)"; 
HC 627 GOSUB797 

BP 623 IFAS="M"ORA$="H"THEN50 
JJ 629 PRINTA$:D=1: IFA$="Y"ORA 

$="Y"THEN D=0 
BX 630 PRINTR$"ARE YOU USING S 

INGLE SHEETS? (Y/N) "j 
PD 631 GOSUB797 
MJ 632 PRINTAS:0=1:IFA$="Y"0RA 

$="Y"THEN 0=0 

OCTOBER 1993 COMPUTE G-29 



PROGRAMS 



BX 635 PRINTRS"NUHBER OF LINES 

BETWEEN NAMES (0-3)?"; 

RD 636 GETA$:IFa'?"<"0"ORA$>"3"T 

HEN636 
AM 637 F=VAL(A$) :PRINTF 
CH 641 IF (NU* (F + 1) X55THEN645 
MJ 642 PRINTR5"PRINT IN TWO CO 

LUMNS? (Y/N)" 
XC 643 GOSUB797 
HS 644 P=a:IF AS="Y"ORAS= "Y"TH 

ENP = 1 
CR 645 PRINTR9"TYPE TITLE: {?} 

";:DS="":GOSUB1300:B$=A 

S 
XS 646 PRINTR$"{3 DOWN} ( PUR) PR 

ESS { SH I FT-S PACE } ANY 

ISHIFT-SPACE}KEY 

{SHIFT-SPACE}TO 

{SHI FT-S PACE }BEGIN 

{ SH I FT-S PACE } PRINTIMG " 
KG 647 PRINT" {2 DOW.M}TO CANCEL 

PRESS {RVS}Q{OFfT" 
GG 648 GETA$:IFAS=""THEN648 
HC 649 IF AS="Q"THEN50 
RB 650 OPEN 4,4,7:G=INT (LEN(BS 

)/2) :PRINT*4,RS 
AD 651 F0RI=1T0 (40-G) :PRINT#4, 

" "; :NEXT:PRIHT#4,BSRSR 

S 
BC 655 IFP=1THEN700 
PP 656 F0RI=1T0NU 
MD 657 GETA$: IFAS="Q"THEN50 
SM 658 IFM<=55THEN666 
KC 659 M=1:IF 0=1 THEN 664 
EJ 660 PRINT"{CLR} (3 D0WN} PRES 

S[SHIFT-SPACE} ANY 

TSHIFT-S PACE} KEY 

{SHIFT-SPACE}TO 

(SHIFT-SPACE } CONT I NUE " 
KG 661 PRINT" {2 DOWN}TO CANCEL 

PRESS [RVS}Q{OFfT" 
FJ 662 GETAS: IFA$=""THEN66Z 
PD 663 PRINT'MCLR}": PRINT#4,R 

$,R$,R5;GOT0666 
HC 664 F0RB=1T05:PRINT#4,RS:NE 

XTB 
GQ 666 IF D=0AND1<=9THENPRINT# 

4," ";I;:GOT0669 
BS 667 IF D=0THENPRINT#4,I; 
SG 669 IF A=0THEN PRINT#4,0G$( 

I) :GOTO680 
MS 670 IF A=1THEN PRINT#4,NAS( 

I) 
ES 680 IFF>0THENFORQ=lTOF:PRIN 

T#4,"":M=M+1:NEXTQ 
RD 682, H=M+l:NEXT:CL0SE4;G0'r05 


BR 700 M=1:0=1:I=1:LN=INT (55/( 

F+1) ) : IFF>0THEN LN=LN+1 
XB 705 K=I:IFI>NUTHENCL0SE4:G0 

TO50 
HR 708 GETA$: IFA$="0"THENCLOSE 

4:GOTO50 
JG 710 IFH<=LNTHEN745 
XH 715 M=1:I=I+LN:K=I:Q=1:IF 

=1 THEN 740 
BR 723 PRINT"{CLR}{3 DOMN} PRES 

G-30 COMPUTE OCTOBER 1993 



S{SHIFT-5PACE}ANY 

TsHIFT-SPftCE}KE¥ 

{ SHIFT-SPACE }T0 

{ SH I FT -S PACE } CONTINUE " 
MK 725 PRINT" {2 DOWN} TO CANCEL 

PRESS Q" 
HS 730 GETA5:IFA5=""THEN730 
JD 735 PRINT"{CLR}":PRINT#4,R$ 

,R$,R5:G0TO745 
RP 740 FORB=1TO10:PRINT#4,"":N 

EXTB 
KH 745 IF D=0ANDK<=9THENPRINT# 

4,"£3 SPACES}";Kr :G0T07 

55 
CK 750 IF D=0THENIFNA$(K) <>""T 

HENPRINT#4,"{2 SPACES}" 

• K ' 
DR 755 IF A=0THEN PRINT#4,0G$( 

K) ;:GOT0765 
RR 760 IF A=1THEN PRINT#4,NAS{ 

K) ; 
AQ 765 IF Q=0THEN78a 
XE 775 K=I+LN:FORJ=lTO40- (LEN( 

NAS (I) )+3) :PRINT#4," "; 

:NEXTJ:Q=0:GOTO745 
DK 780 K=I:Q=1 
CH 790 FORQA=0TOF:PRINT#4,"":N 

EXTQA 
PX 795 M=H+1: I=I+1:GOTO705 
CS 797 GET A$:rF A$<>"Y"ANDA$< 

>"Y"ANDA$<>"N"ANDAS<>"N 

"ANDA$<> "M" ANDA$<> "M"TH 

EN797 
HO 798 IFA$="M"ORA$="H"THEN50 
RP 799 RETURN 
MK 800 PRINT" {CLR}{DOWN}TyPE 

{PUR)H{BLU) to EXIT TO 

{SPACeJmAIN MENU" 
BP 805 PRINT"{2 DOWN}{PUR}TYPE 
TITLE TO SAVE: <(!} 

{BLU}"; :DS="":GOSUB130a 
AQ 808 1FAS="M"ORA$="M"THEN50 
JE 810 OPEN8,8,4,"@3:"+A5+",SE 

Q,W" 
EQ 820 PRINT#8,NU:F0RI=lT0NU:P 

RINT#8,0G$ (I) :NEXTI 
GB 890 CLOSE8:GOTO50 
CX 900 PRINT"{CLR} (DOWN} {BLU}T 

YPE CpUR3m{BLU) TO EXIT 
TO MAIN MENU" 
JH 905 PRINT" (2 DOWN} (PUrJtYPE 
TITLE TO LOAD: (BLuT 

i9>"} :DS="":GOSUB1300 
FM 908 IFA$="M"ORAS="M"THEN50 
JQ 910 0PEN8,8,4,A$+",SEQ,R" 
PM 919 INPUT#8,Na:FORI=lT0 (NU- 

1) :INPUT#8,0GS(I) :NEXTI 

:CL0SE8 
FX 920 IFOG$(l)<>""THEN924 
DS 921 OPEN15,8,15:INPUT{rl5,A$ 

, BS : PRINTR$R$RS " ( PUR} "B 

$:CL0SE15 
AX 922 NU=1:FORZ=1TO1000;NEXTZ 

:GOTO9O0 
FD 924 PRINTR$"(3 DOWN}(PUR}PL 

EASE WAIT{BLU}" 
DK 925 FORI=lT0NU:A$=OGS (I) 



AK 928 A=LEN(A$) :C=A:B=0 

BF 930 IFA=0THENOG$ (1)=" " : GOT 

0990 
KS 940 IFMID$(A$,A,1)=CHR$(32) 

THEN960 
XF 950 A=A-1:B=B+1:IFA=0THENNA 

S=A$:GOTO960 
AF 955 GOTO940 
ES 960 B$=RIGHT$(AS,B) :CS=LEFT 

$(AS,C-B) ;NA$ (I)=B$ + ", 

(SPACE}"+C5 
JA 990 NEXTI:GOTO50 
GE 1000 PRINT"(CLR}(3 DOWN}ERA 

SE ALL NAMES" 
KC 1005 PRINT" (DOWN} {PUR}ARE Y 

OU SURE (Y/N) {7}" 
RH 1010 GET AS:IFAS=""THEN 1.01 


fc 1015 print"(3 down] (pur}ple 
ase{ shi ft-s pace} wait 
Tblu}" 
gg 1020 ifas="n"then 50 
bp 1030 fori=0to349;na5(i}="": 

0G$ tI)="":NU = l:NEXTI:G 

OTO50 
MM 1100 PRINT" (CLR} f PUR} 

(2 DOWN} PLEASE 

{SHI FT-S PACE} SELECT 

{SHIFT-SPACE} FORMAT 

(SHIFT-SPACE } FOR 

(SHI FT -SPACE} ENTERING 

(SHI FT -SPACE} NAMES 

{BLU}" 
HP 1110 PRINT"{2 D0WN}1. . .FIRS 

T NAME LAST NAME" 
PE 1120 PRINT"(D0WN}2. . .LAST N 

AHE, FIRST NAME" 
AH 1130 PRINT" (DOWN} 3. . .NO NAM 

ES (USE FOR NAMES OTHE 

R THAN" 
HK 1140 PRINT SPC(14) "PEOPLE- 

{SPACE}SONG TITLES, ET 

C.) " 
RR 1145 PRINT"(2 DOWN 3 NOTE : TH 

E FORMAT IS FOR ENTERI 

NG NAMES" 
GQ 114 7 PRINT" {6 SPACES }ONLy. 

(2 SPACES }THEY WILL ST 

ILL BE ALPHA-" 
KP 1148 PRINT"{6 SPACES}BETI3E 

D BY THE LAST NAME, UN 

LESS" 
CM 1149 PRINT"(6 SPACES}NO NAM 

ES IS SELECTED." 
QC 1150 GET AS: IF AS<"1" OR A? 

>"3" THEN1150LIST1145- 
SA 1160 FT=VAL (AS) :GOTO50 
XR 1300 GETZ$:IFZS=""THEN1300 
FH 1310 IFZ$=CHR${13)0RZS=CHR$ 

(1 41) THENAS=DS: RETURN 
KP 1320 IFLEN(DS)=0ANDZ$=CHRS { 

20)THEN1300 

EQ 1330 IFZS=CHR$ (20)THEND$=LE 

FTS(D$,LEN(DS)-1) :PRIN 

T"{LEFT} {LEFT}"ZS"<@} 
II . 

SH 1340 IFZ$<" "ORZ5>CHR$(130) 



ANDZS<CHR$(160)THEN13a 


SE 1350 D$=D$+Z$:PRINT"{LEFT)" 

Z$"{&}"} ;GOTOI300 
XQ 1500 LD=1:GOTO50 

Brent Spurlock wrote this program af- 
ter his mother couldn 't understand why 
it was so much trouble to alphabetize 
a list of names using a database, i-ie 
lives in Green Forest, Arkansas. 



MEGAMORPH 



By Tom Zdanowicz 

If you've seen any sci-fi movies or TV 
shows recently, you've probably seen 
characters from the future who change 
their shapes at will. This metamorphic 
technique is achieved by computers, 
and now you can morph with your 64. 

Megamorph can take two bitmapped 
images and render up to a 99-frame mor- 
ph of the first image as it transforms into 
the second. The program works with any 
graphic images that you've saved to 
disk as either PRG or SEQ files. 

You'll also need a copy of Gazette's 
HAG (High-resolution Animation Gener- 
ator) from the April 1992 issue. HAG 
makes minimovies on a 64 by loading 
each frame, compressing it, and then sav- 
ing the whole sequence as a stand-aione 
program ready for playback. 

Megamorph will do all the hard work 
for you. It'll load your images one at a 
time, map each pixel to disk, and render 
each frame into a smooth metamorpho- 
sis of the first image as it changes into the 
second. 

All this work can tai<e a lot of time be- 
cause a single, full-screen bitmapped im- 
age can have up to 64,000 pixels. The 
computer doesn't have enough memory 
to store the coordinates of all the pixels 
in the first and second images, so the da- 
ta is stored on disk as what I call start 
points and stop points. 

The computer then reads the data and 
calculates and draws each frame of the 
transformation for you. You can custom- 
ize the animation by selecting the num- 
ber of frames and image size as well as 
other parameters. 

Entering the Program 

Megamorph's main program is written 
in BASIC, but it uses a machine lan- 
guage subroutine to speed up the scan- 
ning and plotting of images. To help 



avoid typing errors, use The Automat- 
ic Proofreader to enter the BASIC pro- 
gram. See "Typing Aids" elsewhere in 
this section. Be sure to save a copy be- 
fore you attempt to run it. Watch lines 
95 and 8242. They are too long to fit 
on two screen lines without using abbre- 
viations. For the proper Proofreader 
checksums, list the line after you've en- 
tered it, cursor to it, and press Return. 
To enter the machine language por- 
tion of the program, you'll need MLX, 
our machine language entry program; 
again, see "Typing Aids." When MLX 
prompts, reply with the following. 

Starting address: COOO 
Ending address: C1F7 

Save this routine with the filename 
MORPH.ML on the same disk as Mega- 
morph. The BASIC program will load 
the file when it is first run. 

Using the Program 

Load and run Megamorph as you 
would any BASIC program. After the 
ML file loads, you will be prompted for 
a work disk containing your two imag- 
es. These can be created with a graph- 
ics program such as The Print Shop, 
WorldMap 64, LISA, or whatever you 
have. The graphics should be two-col- 
or, high-resolution images saved as 
standard noncompressed PRG or SEQ 
files. 

Save the first image on your work 
disk with the filename 1PAG, and save 
the second image as 2PAG. If you are 
uncertain about the compatibility of 
your files, use the Look option in the 
main menu to check them. This option 
will be described in more detail later. 

Make sure there's enough room on 
your work disk to store all the slides 
and start points/stop points (S/S) files. 
Each frame can be anywhere from 2 to 
32 blocks in size, depending on the 
size of your images. These and the S/ 
S files can easily fill a disk. Keeping im- 
age sizes to half the screen or less will 
usually leave plenty of room for slides. 

After inserting the work disk, press a 
key to see the main menu. The num- 
bered options are as follows. 

1. Load keyframes and morph 
(builds S/S). This option loads and 
maps each image to disk and builds 
the start points and stop points files for 



morphing. After the S/S files have 
been created, the program will pro- 
ceed to render each frame of the mor- 
ph. (See Parameter Setup below.) 

2. Morph existing S/S files. In order 
for this option to work correctly, you 
must have first used option 1 to gener- 
ate the S/S files. Then this option will 
set up parameters and proceed with 
the rendering without having to rescan 
and map the original images. (See Pa- 
rameter Setup below.) 

3. Look. This option allows viewing 
of a PRG or SEQ bitmap file so you 
can check the compatibility of your 
graphics. After selecting the file type 
and name, your image will be dis- 
played if it's compatible. Press any key 
to exit this option. 

4. Exit. This option reboots BASIC 
and erases the program. 

Parameter Setup 

After selecting option 1 or 2, you will 
be prompted for the file type, number 
of rows in each image, the number of 
frames to render, and a frame offset. 

For file type simply press P for PRG 
or S for SEQ files. This is the file type 
of your before and after images. 

The number of rows refers to the 
size of each image. You have a mini- 
mum of 1 row and a maximum of 25. 
Measuring from the top of the screen, 
enter the approximate size in rows for 
each image. This determines how 
much of each image is to be scanned 
and mapped since you may not alwayfe 
want full-screen images. The size of 
each frame rendered will be the larger 
of the two images. 

The number of frames that you se- 
lect can be 2-99. The more frames, the 
smoother the morphing effect will be. 
But with more frames, you'll also use 
more disk space. If the disk fills up be- 
fore the last frame is rendered, no 
more frames will be saved. 

Finally, the frame offset enables you 
to start the rendering at a frame num- 
ber other than 1. Rendering will begin 
with the next frame after the offset. 
This means an offset of 5 will begin ren- 
dering at frame 6, which is useful in 
chaining one morph to another. 

Once your images are ready, load 
and display them with HAG. It will con- 
vert them into a stand-alone program 
for viewing. 

OCTOBER 1993 COMPUTE G-31 



PROGRAMS 



A Few Notes 

The amount of time it tal<es to render a 
sequence is related directly to [he num- 
ber of frames and the size of the imag- 
es. Smaller sequences can be ren- 
dered within an hour, while larger, 
more detailed sequences can take 8- 
12 hours or more. The results, howev- 
er, are well worth the wait. I usually set 
up large images on my computer be- 
fore I go to bed and awake to a new 
morph in the morning. 

Another thing worth mentioning is 
that during testing I seem to have dis- 
covered a possible bug in the HAG pro- 
gram in that no two slides can be iden- 
tical, HAG can load them, but when 
they're played back, strange things 
can happen. Also, with less than full- 
screen sequences, the HAG program 
doesn't blank the rest of the screen. 
While this can be annoying, it isn't a ma- 
jor problem. (Editor's note: HAG and all 
of the other programs on the April 
1992 Gazette Disk are still available. 
The U.S. price is $11.95. Write to Ga- 
zette Disk, COMPUTE Publications, 
324 West Wendover Avenue, Suite 
200, Greensboro. North Carolina 
27408. You can order by credit card 
by calling 919-275-9809.) 

To let the user know what the pro- 
gram is doing, the border color will 
change according to what is taking 
place, The colors are as follows. Blue 
indicates an image is loading. Red in- 
dicates an image is being scanned 
and mapped to disk. Yellow means the 
program is comparing and equalizing 
S/S files. Green indicates a frame is be- 
ing rendered. Light blue indicates the 
program is saving a slide to disk. 

When it has finished rendering, the 
program will flash the border and 
sound an alarm. Press any key to turn 
off the alarm and return to the main 
menu. 

Any disk errors that occur during 
mapping or rendering are usually fatal, 
so make sure that you have the prop- 
er files on your work disk. If you select 
option 1, make sure there are no S/S 
files on your work disk because it will 
try to create them, producing a disk er- 
ror and possible crash. Also, if your 
disk contains slides from another mor- 
ph, make sure you don't try to create 
slide numbers that already exist. This 
too will cause an error. If you wish to 

G-32 COMPUTE OCTOBER 1993 



add one morph to another, use the off- 
set to render the new morph, starting 
with the next available slide number. 

Experimentation is the best way to re- 
alize the full potential of Megamorph. 
There is no limit to the detail of the im- 
ages, and they don't even have to be 
the same size or on the same section 
of the screen. I've used this program to 
create some truly dazzling morphing se- 
quences that have been used for eye- 
catching titling and graphics effects. 

MEGAMORPH 

JF 13 REM HEGAMORPHS V2.0 BY T 

OH ZDANOWICZ 

HM 80 REM COPYRIGHT 1993 - COM 

PUTE PUBLICATICHS INTL L 

TD - ALL RIGHTS RESERVED 

SR 85 IFA=0THENA=1:LOAD"MORPM. 

ML ",8,1 
GS 94 OPEN15,8,15 
,AQ 95 PRINT"{CLR}":POKE53280,a 
:POKE53281,0:PRItgT" 
{2 SPACES}PLEASE INSERT 
{SPACE)WORK DISK WITH IM 
AGES" 
MC 96 PRINT"{5 SPACES)AND PRES 

S A KEY TO CONTINUE" 
CH 97 GETAS:IFA$=""THEN97 
AF 100 PRINT"{CLR}":POKE532Q0, 

a:POKE53281,a 
RJ lis PRINT:PRINT:PRINTSPC(14 

) "{BLUjMEGAMORPHS" 
CF 120 PRINT SPC{14)"-Cig Y}":P 

RINT:PRINT 
JG 130 PRINT "(CYN}1. LOAD KEY 
FRAMES & MORPH (BUILDS 
{SPACE}S/S) ":PRINT 
DR 140 PRINT "2. MORPH EXISTIN 
G S/S POINTS FILES":PRI 
NT 

PRINT 
PRINT 



BH 155 
BC 157 
DM 160 

CQ 173 

XF 183 
Cf 199 
DG 200 

PX 204 



MX 205 

QD 206 
XQ 230 

FF 241 

CB 250 



"3. LOOK":PRINT 

"5. EXIT" 
GET CS:C=VAL{C$) :IFC<10 
R05THEN 160 
ON C GOTO 200,190,6021, 
180 

SYS64733 

GQSUB 9000:GOTO8020 
REM *SET BITMAP hiiD LOA 
D KEYFRAMES* 
PRINT"IMAGE FILE TYPE ( 
{RVS)P{OFF)RG/(RVS)S 
{OFF}EQ) ":GETFTS 
IFFT$<>"S"ANDFTS<>"P"TH 
ENPRINT"{2 UP}":GOTO204 
GOSUB90O0 
REM *******LOAD KEYFRAM 

HB = N1*3 20:NMS="0: IP AG, " 
+PT9+",R" 

GOSUB5040:OPEN5,S,5, "'d: 
STARTPOINTS,S,W":YHAX=N 
l*8:GOSUB300:Ll=CT 



MB=N2*3 20:NM$="0: 2 PAG," 
+FT$+",R" 

GOSUB604 0:OPEN5,8,5,"a: 
STOPPOINTS,S,W": YMAX=N2 
*a:GOSUB 300:L2=CT 
GOSUB 7031:GOTO8026 
REM *** HAP IMAGE TO DI 
SK ***** 

POKE53 280,2:CT=0:FORY=a 
TOYMAX:FORX=0TO319 

HB=INT (X/256) :LB=X-(256 

*HB) 

POKE 840,LB:POKE841,HB: 

POKE842,Y:POKE 766,3:SY 

S49271 

IF PEEK(767)=0 THEN 340 

PRINT#5,X:PRINT#5,Y:CT= 

CT + 2 

NEXT: NEXT: CLOSES; RETURN 
REM ***VIEH IMAGE FILE 
***** 

GOSUB6a25:GOTO6105 
PRINT"IMAGE FILE TYPE 
{SPACE} ( {RVS]P{OFF}RG/ 
{RVS)S(OFF}EQ) ":GETFT$ 
IFFTS<>"S"ANDFT$<>"P"T 
HENPRINT"{2 UP)":G0T06 
025 

PRINT" {CLR}": INPUT"FIL 
ENAME TO VIEW";N$:NM5= 
"0: " + NS+","+FT$+",R" 
IFPTS="P"THEN6055 
INPUT"NUMBER OF ROWS T 
VIEW/SAVE";NR:MB=NR* 
320 

SYS4 9161:POKE680,12:SY 
S49220 

BC=PEEK(53280) :POKE532 
a 0,6: OPENS, 8, 5, NHS: GOT 
06357 

SYS4 9161: POKE680,12:SY 
S49 220:POKE147,0:SYS57 
812N$,8,l:SYS626 31:GOT 
06135 

AD=8192:NB=0 
GET#5,XS 

IFXS=""THENX$=CHRS (0) 
X=ASC(XS) :POKEAD,X: AD= 
AD+1:NB=NB+1:IFNB=MDTH 
EN6100 

IF ST=64THEN6100 
GOTO6060 

CL0SE5:P0KE53 2BR,BC:RE 
TURN 

GETAS:IFA$=""THEN6105 
REM ***RECOVER TEXT MO 
DE******{S SPACES}6108 
REH ***************** 
********* 

POKE5326S,PEEK(S3265) A 
ND223:P0KE53272, (PEEK( 
5 327 2) AND240)OR4:GOTO1 



XP 7010 REH ** REMAP AND EQUAL 

IZE **** 
PD 7020 REM * STARTPOINTS/STOP 

POINTS * 



JH 


252 


CM 


253 


RH 


260 


Bfi 


297 


ED 


300 


ER 


301 


FB 


310 


JB 


320 


QO 


330 


FD 


340 


KX 


6010 


FP 


6021 


BG 


6025 


AS 


6026 


JS 


6330 


HK 


6331 


CA 


6035 


MR 


6040 


PR 


6050 


CA 


6055 


SQ 


6057 


XD 


6060 


MP 


6070 


HG 


6075 


GJ 


6076 


RD 


6080 


RH 


6100 


PH 


6105 


CS 


6107 


HP 


6110 



KJ 7031 POKES1280,7 

BB 7040 IFLKL2THEN 7373 

XE 7050 IFL2<L1THEN 7200 

KH 706{l IFL1 = L2THEN RETURN 

EG 7070 OPEW5,8,5, "0:STARTCOPY 

,S,H":OPEB6,8, 6, "9: ST A 

RTPOINTS,S,R" 
KG 7080 INPUT#6,X: INPUT#6,Y:SU 

=ST:PRlNT#5,X:PRINTt5, 

Y:IPSU = 64THEt47100 
CA 7090 GOTO7080 
PQ 7100 CL0SE5:CL0SE6 
GS 7110 OPEN5,a,5,"0:STARTPOIN 

TS,A";OPEN6,8, 6,"0:STA 

RTCOPY,S,R" 
MB 7120 INPUT#6,X:INPUT#6,Y:SU 

=ST: PRINT#5,X:PRINTf5, 

Y:L1=L1+2:IFL1=L2THEN7 

150 
CF 7121 IFSO=64THEN7140 
CC 7130 GOTO 7120 
XE 7140 CLOSE6:OPSN6,a,6,"0:ST 

ARTCOPY,S,R":GOTO7120 
QF 7150 CLOSE5:CLOSE6:PRINT#15 

,"S0:STARTCOPY": RETURN 
PH 7200 OPEN5,8,5,"0:STOPCOPY, 

S,W":OPEN6,8,6,"0:STOP 

POINTS,S,R" 
JR 7210 INPUT#6,X:INPUT#6,Y:SU 

=ST:PRINT#5,X:PRINT#5, 

Y: IFSU = 64THEN7233 
ME 7220 GOT07213 
KF 7230 CLOSE5:CLOSE6 
BH 7240 OPEN5,8,5,"0:STOPPOINT 

S,A":OPEN6,8,6,"0;STOP 

COPY,S,R" 
BX 72S0 INPUT#6,X:INPUT#6,Y:SU 

=ST SPRINT* 5, X:PRINT*5, 

Y:L2=L2+2:IFL2=L1THEN7 

290 
RE 7269 IFSO=64TH1N7280 
XX 7270 GOTO 7250 
HQ 7289 CLOSE6:OPEN6,8,6,"0;ST 

OPCOPY , S , R" : GOTO7250 
PP 7290 CLOSE5:CLOSE6;PRINT#15 

,"S0:STOPCOPY": RETURN 
AD 800 REM ****************** 

****** 

FH 8010 REM *** MORPH TWO IMAG 

ES *** 
PF 8320 REM **** MAIN MENU OPT 

ION 2 HERE** 
EH 8021 PRINT:PRINT:OPEN5,8,5, 

"0:STARTPOINTS,S,R":L1 

= 
FQ 8022 INPUT#5,V:Ll=Ll+l:IFST 

O64THEN8022 
JC 8023 PRINT"{PUR)NUMBER OF P 

IXELS IN S/S FIi:,ES = 

[GRN}";INT (Ll/2) 
FD 8024 PRINT:PRINT"{7 SPACES} 

{REDHRVS]PRESS A KEY 

{SPACE}TO CONTINUE 

(OFF) {CYN}":CL0SE5 
RJ 8925 GETAS:IFAS=""THEN8025 
JS 8026 REM ***HRIN MENU OPTIO 

N 1 HERE** 



BM 8027 POKES3280,5 

HG 8030 SS=1/NS 

GD 8040 FORI=0TONS:SYS49161:PO 

KE68 0, 12:SYS49 229:IA=I 

*SS 
HQ 8045 OPEN5,8,5,"0:STARTPOIN 
TS,S,R":OPEN6,8,6,"0:S 
TOPPOINTS,S,R" 
FE 8050 FORJ=0TOL1STEP2 
AJ 8055 INPUT#5,X:INPUT#5,Y: IN 

PUT#6,X2: INPUT#6,Y2 
FP 8060 X1=X+IA*(X2-X) :Y1=Y+IA 

*(Y2-Y) 
KR 8070 HB=INT(Xl/256) :L6=Xl-( 

256*HB) 
SE 8080 POKE840,LB:POKE841,HB: 

P0KE842,Y1: POKE 766,1:3 

YS49271 
GX 8090 NEXT:CLOSE5:CLOSE6 
FC 8091 REM ***BUILD SLIDE FIL 

ENAME** 
DK 8092 IFI=SI THEN GOSUB 8700 
MH 8093 GOSUB 8500 
PE 8105 BC=PEEK(53280) : POKE532 

80, 14:SYS 49612: POKE 532 

80,BC:SEXT 
QR 8111 REM ****RECOVER TEXT M 

ODE**** 
MM 8200 POKE53265,PEEK(53265) A 

ND223:POKE53272, (PEEK( 

53272) AND 240) 0R4: PRINT 

"{CLR}" 
BQ 8201 PRINT: PRINT: PRINT" 

(11 SPACES) (CYN}MORPH 

{SPACElFINISHED" 
AS 8282 PRINT:PRINT:PRINT:PRIN 

T: PRINT: PRINT: PRINT" 

{11 SPACES] {RVS}{BLU}P 

RESS ANY KEY {OFF)" 
FS 8240 GETA$:IFAS<>""THEN100 
DP 3242 POKE54296,21:POKE54277 

,9:POKE5427 8,0:POKE542 

73,48:POKE54276,32:POK 

E54276,33 
FS 8244 POKE53280,253-(PEEK(53 

280>+l) :FORD=1TO300:NE 

XTJGOTO8240 
GQ 8500 SN=I+1+0S:S$=STR$(SN) 
FQ 8510 IFSN>9THEN8540 
CR 8520 S5=MID$(S$,2,1) :SS="0" 

+ S$ 
QS 3530 GOTO 8559 
AH 8543 S$=MID$(S$,2,2) 
KK 8553 SNS="SLIDE"+S$ 
KM 8560 MM=757:FORP=1T07:K$=MI 

DS (SN$,P,1) :POKEMM,ASC 
(K5) :MM=MM+1:NEXT 
BB 8570 IFN1>N2THENMB=N1*320 
XX 8589 IFN2>N1THENMB=N2*320 
AS 8599 IFN1=N2THENMB=N1*320 
GK 8690 LA=8192+MB:LH=INT (LA/2 

56) :LL=LA-(256*LH) :POK 

E7 55,Li:.:POKE756,LH:RET 

URN 
RK 8700 11=1 :O1=OS:OS=0 
FF 8710 FORI=SITOEI:GOSUB8500 
QC 8720 BC=PEEK(532B0) :P0KE532 



PP 8730 
PA 9000 



HP 9005 



AJ 9010 



AP 9012 
AM 9015 



80,14;SYS49612;POKE532 
8 , BC : HE XT 

i=i1;os=01:return 
input"#{right)rows in 

{SPACE)IMAG1(1-25)";N1 
: IFN1<10RN1>25THENPRIN 
T"{2 UP)":GOTO9000 
INPUT"#{RIGHT)R0WS IN 
{SPACE)IMAG2(1-25)";N2 
:IFN2<10RN2>2 5THENPRIN 
T"{2 UP)":GOTO9000 
INPUT"NUMBER OF FRAMES 
(2-9 9) ";NS:IFNS<20RNS> 
99THENPRINT"{2 UP)":GO 
TO9al0 
b!S=HS-l 

OS=0:INPUT"FRAME OFFSE 
T";OSS: IFVAL(0S5) >990R 
OS<0THENPRINT"{2 UP}": 
GOTO9015 



KX 9016 


OS 


=VAL{0 


S$) 


:re 


,TUI 


KH 




AK 10060 GOTO100 












MORPH.ML 
















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FE 


A5 


FF 


0A 


C10a:6D 


41 


93 


85 


FF 


AE 


3F 


03 


87 


C110:BD 


C4 


CI 


8D 


47 


03 


A0 


00 


3C 


C118:Bl 


FE 


2D 


47 


03 


F0 


08 


A9 


E3 


C120:01 


8D 


FF 


02 


4C 


2C 


CI 


A9 


E7 


C128:00 


80 


FF 


02 


Bl 


FE 


43 


AD 


F6 


C130:FE 


02 


F0 


07 


68 


00 


47 


03 


4B 


0138:91 


FE 


60 


68 


40 


47 


03 


91 


F5 


C140:FE 


60 


00 


00 


40 


01 


80 


02 


64 


C148:C0 


03 


00 


05 


40 


06 


30 


07 


SP 


C150:C0 


08 


00 


0A 


40 


0B 


30 


9C 


12 


C15B:C0 


0D 


00 


0F 


40 


10 


30 


11 


04 


C160:C0 


12 


00 


14 


40 


15 


80 


16 


77 



OCTOBER 1993 COMPUTE G-33 



PROGRAMS 



C168 


:ca 


17 


00 


19 


40 


lA 


80 


IB 


2A 


C170 


:C0 


IC 


00 


IE 


00 


00 


08 


00 


4D 


C178 


:10 


00 


18 


00 


20 


00 


28 


00 


58 


C180 


:3a 


00 


38 


00 


40 


00 


48 


00 


B5 


C138 


:50 


00 


58 


00 


60 


00 


68 


00 


13 


C19(! 


70 


00 


78 


00 


80 


09 


88 


00 


70 


C198 


90 


00 


93 


00 


A0 


00 


A3 


00 


cn 


ClAa 


B0 


00 


BS 


00 


C0 


00 


C8 


00 


2B 


C1A8 


D0 


00 


D8 


00 


E0 


00 


E8 


00 


38 


C1B0 


F0 


00 


F8 


00 


00 


01 


08 


01 


E0 


C1B8 


10 


01 


18 


01 


20 


01 


28 


01 


ED 


C1C3 


30 


31 


38 


01 


01 


02 


04 


08 


D3 


CICB 


10 


20 


40 


80 


A9 


05 


A2 


03 


IB 


C1D0 


A0 


FF 


20 


BA 


FF 


A9 


07 


A2 


AB 


C1D8 


F5 


A0 


02 


20 


BD 


FF 


A9 


00 


(i-\ 


ClEO 


85 


FC 


A9 


20 


85 


FD 


A9 


FC 


17. 


C1E8 


AE 


F3 


02 


AC 


F4 


02 


20 


08 


94 


C1F0 


FF 


60 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


8C 



Tom Zdanowicz is a 26-y ear-old film 
and video major at Pliillips Junior Col- 
lege in Dayiona Beacli, Florida. When 
lie's not at the beach, he enjoys writing 
software to prove the 64 can still keep 
up with the times. 



MENU MAKER 



By Rizwaan Ahmed Khan 
Have you ever loaded a disk directory 
and been confused by what you see? All 
the program names, filenames, and da- 
ta files can be confusing unless you use 
them every day. Does this program actu- 
ally run, or is it a data file for another pro- 
gram? If you're fed up searching clut- 
tered disk directories for programs, then 
you need Menu Maker. 

This program for the 64 creates a 
menu from which you can boot pro- 
grams. You specify the program names 
you want to appear on the menu, and 
Menu Maker does the rest. 

Typmg It In 

Menu Maker is written entirely in BA- 
SIC. To help avoid typing errors, enter 
it with The Automatic Proofreader. See 
"Typing Aids" elsewhere in this sec- 
tion. Be sure to save a copy of the pro- 
gram before you try to run it. 

Getting Started 

When you run Menu Maker, you'll be 
asked for the filenames of programs 
that you want to appear on your disk 
menu. At this point, make sure that you 
know the program filenames and that 
the desired disk is in the drive. 

Enter all the filenames that you'd nor- 
mally use to boot a program. Enter on- 
ly the name of any boot programs. Do 

G-34 COMPUTE OCTOBER 1993 



not include any secondary programs 
or data files. Remember, the whole 
point is to keep your disk menu unclut- 
tered for easy use. 

When you have finished entering file- 
names, enter an asterisk (*) to quit. 
Once again, make sure that the de- 
sired disk is in the drive. Menu Maker 
will modify itself and save a new ver- 
sion to your disk under the filename 
MENU, 

Once the process is complete, the 
READY prompt will appear, but your 
64 will be locked up. Simply reboot it. 
To make use of the new menu, simply 
type LOAD "MENU".8, 1 and press Re- 
turn, The menu program will load and 
run automatically. 

You'll then see a menu of the file- 
names that you entered. To select a pro- 
gram, highlight the desired program 
with the cursor keys or with a joystick 
plugged into either port. Run the high- 
lighted program by pressing Return or 
the fire button. 

Should you want to add additional 
programs to the menu at a later time, 
simply rerun Menu Maker. It will create 
a new version of the menu and delete 
the old one. 



MENU MAKER 

HJ GOTO601: REM 
93 - COMPUTE 
INTL LTD 

GQ 5 F=0:DIMN$(50) 
":POKE53281,0 
:J=S6320:K=56 

BK 6 Q=126:W=125:E 
=111:0=239:PR 
:PRINTCHRS (8) 

XD 7 X$="{CYNHRVS 
":YS="[0FF}{1 



COPYRIGHT 19 
PUBLICATIONS 

:PRINT"{CLR} 
:POKE53280,2 
321 

=254:R-253:Y 
INTCHRS (142) 

}{16 SPACES} 
6 SPACES}<6> 



SQ 9 DATA,"tCYN}{RVS} 

(16 SPACES)", "{RVS){CYN} 
[16 SPACES}" 

PG 190 READNS(F) :IFNS{F)="*"TH 
ENB=F-3:N$(F) =XS;F=F+1: 
N$ (F)=XS:GOTO200 

FX 195 F=F+1:GOTO190 

XK 200 PRINT'MHOME) [13 SPACES} 

{YEL} [RVS}AUT0 LOADER": 

P0KE198,3:L=1:0PEN1S,8, 

15,"I":CL0SE15 

KG 210 PRINT"[5 DOWN}{5>{40 P} 
ir 

XE 215 PRINT" [4 DOWN}{5>{40 Y> 

11 

QQ 216 PRINT" [6 DOWN} "; "{3 J- OS 
E CURSOR KEYS OR JOYSTI 
CK TO SELECT" 

EH 217 PRINT"[D0WN}{5 SPACES}? 



DQ 


230 


KG 


235 


SK 


240 


PH 


245 


PR 


250 


RH 


255 


FK 


495 



PS 41C 



JS 


415 


KK 


450 


KQ 


455 


6H 


460 


RD 


470 


PP 


500 



JF 505 

ME 510 
CQ 600 



JA 601 
EA 602 



BB 603 

HE 604 

QM 605 



PH 


606 


BE 


607 


MQ 


60S 


RQ 


615 


QG 


620 



RQ 622 



RESS 'RETURN' OR 'FIRE' 

TO LOAD." 
PRINT" {HOME} [5 D0WNK6> 
":I=L 

PRINT" {DOWN} [7 RIGHT) 
{6>";N$(I) ;Y5:L=I:I=I+1 
PRINT"(7 RIGHT}";N$(I) ; 
Y$:I=I+1 
PRINT"{7 RIGHT) [RVS} 

[YEL}";N$tl) ;yS:B$=nS(i 

) :I=I+1 

PRINT"{7 RIGHT}{6J'";N9 ( 

I) ;Y$:I=I+1 

PRINT"[7 RIGHT}";N$(I) ; 

Y$:I=I+1 

IFPEEK (J) =QORPEEK (K) =ET 

HENIFL<>1THENL=L-1:G0T0 

230 

IFPEEK (J) =WORPEEK(K) =RT 

HENIFL<>BTHENL=L+1;G0T0 

230 

IFPEEK (J) =YORPEEK(K)=UT 
HEN500 

GETA$: IFA$=" (DOWN} "THEN 
IFL<>BTHENL=L+1:GOTO2 30 
IFA$="[UP}"ORAS=" 
{RIGHT}"THENIPL<>1THENL 
=L-1:GOTO230 
IFA$=CHR$ (13)THENS00 
GOTO405 

L=L+2: PRINT" {BLK}(CLR} 
[HOHE}LOAD";CHR$(34) ;N$ 
(L) ;CHR$(34) ;",8,1":PRI 
NT"{4 DOWN}RUN" 
PRINT"[H0ME}{11 DOWN) 
[9 RIGHT) (PUR}LOADING : 
{CYN)";N$(L) ;"{BLK}":P 
RIUTCHRS(9) 

POKE631,19:POKE63 2,13:P 
OKE 6 3 3, 13: POKE 198, 3: END 
POKE1024,18:POKE102 5,1: 
POKE 1026, 11: POKE 10 27, 8: 
POKE 1028,1: POKE 1029, 14 
I.= 15:C»=0 

PRINT"{CLR} (YEL} [DOWN} 
MENU HAKER":POKS53281,0 
:POKE5328a,0 
PRINT"[DOWN) BY (RVS}R. 
A.KHAN":IFX=1THEN620 
PRINT" (2 DOWN} PRES.S '* 
' TO STOP"; PRINT" TYPE 
(SPACE)IN FILENAME":INP 
UTA$:L$=LS+A$+"," 
PRINT"(BLK}"; :C=C+1:IFA 
$="*"THENX=1:GOTO607 
IFCO4THEN602 
G=LEN(L$) :L$=LEFT$(L$,G 
-1) :PRINT"{CLR}(HOME}"; 
L;"DATA";LS:LS="" 
PRINT"L="L"+1:X="X":G0T 
0602" 

POKE6 31,19:POKE632,13:P 
OKE 63 3, 13: POKE 198, 3: END 
PRINT" (CLR) {H0ME)a POKE 
770,131:POKE771,164"tPR 
INT "GOTO 630" 
POKE631,19:POKE632,13:P 



OKE633,13:POKEl98,3:END 
CR 630 POKEl9B,0:C=6a0:Q=C+10 
KE 631 PRINT" {CLK} {HOME)"; 
QA 632 PRINT"{i:EL}";C:C=C+L:IF 

C=QTHENPRINT" {BLK}C="C" 

:Q=C+10:"; :GOT0634 
MS 633 GOT0632 
AE 634 PRINT"IFC=640THENPOKE19 

8,0:RUN9900" 
EH 635 PRINT"{2 DOWtJ}GOT063I" : 

G0TO636 
AS 636 POKE631,19:FORJ=632T064 

4: POKE J, 13: NEXT J: POKE 19 

8,13:END 
BQ 9899 END 

PG 9903 OPEN15,8,15,"I":CLOSEl 
5:OPEN15,8,15,"S0:MENU 
":C[,0SE15 
FQ 9935 PRINT"{CLR}{12 DOWN} 

{12 RIGHT}BOOTING MENU 

AE 9910 POKE770,113:eOKE771,16 
8:POKE43,0:POKE44,3:SA 
VE"HENU",8:END 

Rizwaan Ahmed Khan lives in 
Taihape, New Zealand. 

REDI-RITER128 

By Robert Nellist 

The elaborate features of commercial 
word processors are great if you use 
them every day, but occasional writers of- 
ten forget many of the complicated com- 
mands. Many times you have to pull out 
the instruction manual before you can 
write and print a simple document. As a 
consequence, many letters either never 
get written or are banged out on an old 
typewriter. 

If you can identify with the above par- 
agraph, Redi-Riter 128 is just for you. It's 
a simple-to-use word processor written en- 
tirely in BASIC 7.0, but you will need an 
80-column monitor. To help avoid typing 
errors, enter Redi-Riter 128 with The Au- 
tomatic Proofreader; see "Typing Aids" 
elsewhere in this section. Be sure to 
save a copy of the program before you 
try to run it. 

Starting to Write 

Redi-Riter 128 loads in about two sec- 
onds from a 1571 drive. The com- 
mands are constantly displayed at the 
top of the screen, so there's seldom a 
need to refer to the instructions. This is 
a true WYSIWYG word processor with 
word-wrap and fast typing response. 
Alt you have to do is select a margin 
and start typing. 



Since your letter prints line by line, 
it'll be ready for signing and mailing the 
instant you finish typing it. Just make 
sure your printer is ready when you 
start to write. Best of all, Redi-Riter 128 
provides some welcome options that 
are usually lacking in the more elabo- 
rate word processors- 

Unusud Features 

There are four quick-set options avail- 
able to you. An Option Status Bar, lo- 
cated just above the line numbers, 
provides important information such as 
when you can select an option and 
which one, if any, is in use. Only one op- 
tion can be in effect at any given time. 

The Tab key activates a paragraph 
indent. This option indents the first line 
of a paragraph, and the option stays in 
effect until you turn it off, 

Ctrl-C selects single-line auto center- 
ing, and Ctrl-R selects single-line right 
justification. Single-line options accept 
six fewer characters than normal lines 
and must be ended by a Return. To se- 
lect any one of the above options, be 
sure the Option Status Bar reads OK to 
select. You can then issue an appropri- 
ate command. 

There is one more option that won't 
be used much for letter writing but is 
great for an outline, list, or index. This 
feature lets you lock in a left margin in- 
dent of up to 20 characters. 

To activate it, first make sure the Op- 
tion Status Bar is clear and then press 
the space bar up to 20 times to posi- 
tion the cursor at the desired indent. 
The Option Status Bar will help you by 
displaying the indent count. When you 
have defined the indent, press Ctrl- 
Tab to lock it in. 

A document can contain as many dif- 
ferent indents as you desire. To 
change the indent, you must turn off 
the option (see below) and then repeat 
the above procedure. 

Pressing the Esc key immediately fol- 
lowing a Return will turn off any option 
and permit another to be selected. (Sin- 
gle-line options are automatically 
turned off when you press Return.) The 
Esc key will also cancel any option you 
may have chosen accidentally, as 
long as you use it before typing. 

Form feed occurs automatically after 
55 lines or whenever Ctrl-F is pressed 
immediately following a Return. Each 



line is numbered on the screen, so 
you1l always know where you are. A 
warning tone will sound for each of the 
last three lines on a page. 

Limitations 

Since each line is printed out as soon 
as it is completed, corrections must be 
made prior to printing. A beep warns 
you that a line will print after four more 
keypresses. When you hear this, it's a 
good idea to double-check the current 
line for errors. 

You can go back and correct any er- 
rors by pressing the Inst/Del key and re- 
typing the remainder of the line. Just 
as with a conventional typewriter, Redi- 
Riter 128 won't be able to save your 
document to disk or make duplicate 
printouts. Save that job for your regu- 
lar word processor. 

Customizing 

Its ease of customizing is one reason 1 
like BASIC, CHR$(12) is an almost uni- 
versal printer command for form feed. 
If you have a form-feed problem, you 
can change this command in lines 110 
and 470 to whatever command your 
printer requires. If you want the pro- 
gram to issue any whole-document 
printer commands (such as for NLQ), 
you can enter them in place of the 
REM statement in line 80. For example, 
to put my Panasonic printer in its NLQ 
mode, line 80 would read as follows. 

PRINT#2,CHR$(27)CHfl$(120)CHR$(1) 

iVlisceilaneous Memoranda 

Return is used to end paragraphs and 
the single-line options. You can also 
use it to create biank lines or to add 
more space at the top of a document. 
Press Ctrl-T to close the printer and 
end the program. If you have a docu- 
ment to send to the printer, be sure to 
use Ctrl-F first to issue a form feed. 

REDI-RITER 128 

BM REM COPYRIGHT 1993 - COMP 
UTE PUBLICATIONS INTL LTD 

- ALL RIGHTS RESERVED 
MM 10 CLR:FAST:DIMA$(89) :N=1:L 

=l;SP=l:COLOR5,l:COLOR6, 

16:F0RX=1T039:P$=P$+"*": 

NEXT 
AQ 20 SYS49474:SYS65520, ,6,20, 

0:PRINT"* * *(2 SPACES}R 
EDI-RITER 

OCTOBER 1993 COMPUTE G-35 



PROGRAMS 



DA 70 



AA 39 



{2 SPACES)! 2 8 

{2 SPACES}* * *" 
AA 30 SYS65520,,18,17,0;PRINT" 
PLEASE ENTER A MARGIN VA 
CUE BETWEEN 3 AND 20 "; : 
INPUTM:LS=H:LM=M:RS=31-( 
LM+M) :IFM<3ORM>20THEN30 
AD 40 PRINTCHRS (14)CHRS (147) "R 
ETURN = END PARAGRAPH"SP 
C(5) " CTRL -T = QUIT"SPC(6 
) " nJST/DEL = CORRECT IN 
■{SPACE }CURREtJT LINE" 
MD 50 PRINT "CTRL-TAB = LOCK IN 
DENT AT CURSOR , POSITION" 
SPC(5) " TAB KEY = AUTO PA 
RAGRAPK INDENT": PRINT"CT 
RL-C = CENTER 1 LINE"SPC 
(5) "ESC KEY = OPTION CAN 
CEL"SPC (4) ; 
CJ 60 PRINT" CTRL -R = RT.JUSTIF 
Y 1 LIHE":PRINT" BEEP = N 
EAR END OF LI NE"SPC (4 ) "T 
ONE = NEAR END OF PAGE"S 
PC (4) " CTRL -F = FORCED FO 
RM FEED" 

OPEN4,4,7:OPEN 2,4:SYS52 
591: WINDOWS, 4, 79, 24 ;PRIN 
T 

REM:YOU CAN ENTER YOUR P 
PINTER'S SPECIAL COMMAND 
(S) HERE (SEE INSTRUCTIO 
NS) 

FORX = NTORS:TRAP550:'lFX=R 
S-3THENSOUND1,7000,10 

IFX=NANDL>52THENPLAY"V1 

O4T0U9X0B" 

IFL = 56THENPRINT#2,CHRS ( 

12) :L=-1:PR1NTTAB(LH)P$ 

IFRT=1ANDC=1THENX=RS : LS 

=LS+4:RS=RS-4:RT=0:GOTO 

420 

IFX=1THENS=0:SP=1;SYSS1 

794:GOSUB500 

IFX<N+20RA${1)=CHR$(3 2) 

ANDB=0ANDC=0THENGOSUB51 



AS(X)="":Getk;eya$ (X) :l = 

ASC(A$(X)) !IFI=34THENI= 
39:A5 (X)=CHRS{39) 
IFX=1THEHBEGIN 
IFR=lANDI=3 2THEN153 
IFI=27THENX=RS:LS=M:LM= 
M:RS=81-{LM+M) :RT=a:C=0 
:B=0:R=0:GOTO420 
IFI=9ANDB=0ANDC=0THENC= 

I:rt=1:b5=" par. indent 
{SPACE}ON ":GOTO120 
IFI=3ANDB=0ANDC=0THENB= 
l:LS=M+INT (RS/2) :B$=" C 
ENTERING 0NC2 SPACES}": 
GOTO 130 

IFI=18ANDB=0ANDC=0THENB 
=2:LS=M+RS-1:BS=" RT.JU 
STIFY on ":GOTO130 
BEND: IFI=6ANDB=0THENL=5 
6:GOTO110 
IFI=24ANDB=0ANDC=0ANDSP 

G-36 COMPUTE OCTOBER 1993 



EM 


90 


JQ 


100 


GQ 


110 


RB 


120 


PG 


130 


MH 


140 



PQ 150 



GR 


163 


xo 


173 


MD 


180 


CJ 


190 


HX 


200 


EP 


210 


XJ 


220 


HB 


230 



AQ 
FQ 
KG 
XJ 


240 
250 
260 
270 


JE 


280 


CH 


290 


RB 


300 


BA 


310 


HS 


320 


FG 


330 


HR 


340 


OP 


350 


JK 


360 


EE 


370 


FQ 


380 


FD 


390 



HC 400 

RS 410 
SS 420 
FA 430 



AR 440 

JF 453 
DE 460 



QS 470 



AE 480 



GS 490 



EC 500 



QB 510 



=XANDX>1ANDX<22THENC=2: 

LM=M+X-1:X=RS:LS=LM:RS= 

81- (LM+M) :B5="INDENT LO 

CK ON ":N=1:GOTO420 

IFI=»32THENS = 0:SP=SP+I 

IF1=20ANDX>1THEN323 

IFI=30ANDX=1THEN430 

IFI=30THENS=0:RS=X-1:GO 

SUB440:GOTO430 

IFI=13THENA5 (X) =CHHS (95 

) :I«95;GOTO300 

IFI<320RI>96ANDI<19 30RB 

>0ANDX>RS-6THEN150 

IFB=1AHDX/2<>INT{X/2)0R 

B>0ANDI=9 5THENLS=LS+1 

IFB>0THENC$=C$+AS (X) : LS 

=LS-1:SYS517 94;GOSUBS03 

:PRINTC5; :GOTO360 

PRINTA$(X) ; :IFI=2 0THENB 

EGIN 

IFB=1AMDX/2=INT (X/2)THE 

NLS=LS-1 

IFB>0THENLL=LEN(CS) -1:C 

S = LF:FTS{C$,LL) :LS = LS + 1 

BEND:X=X-2!S=S-1:SP=SP- 

1:GOTO420 

IFI=95THENBEGIN:C5="":B 

=0:N=1:S=0:HT=1 :L=L+1 

IFX=1THENX=RS:PRINT#4:L 

S=LH:RS = 81- (LM+M) :R = 0tP 

RINT:GOTO420 

BEND:RS=X-1;GOSUB440:X= 

RS:GOTO420 

IFX=RSANDS=0ORX=RSANDI> 

43ANDI<480RX=RSANDI>57A 

NDI<60ORX=RSANDI=3 3ORX= 

RSANDI=6 3THENS=0:GOSUB4 

40:N=1:L=L+1:R=I:GOTO42 



IFX=RSTHENGOSUB4 43:N=S+ 

1:L=L+1:GOTO420 

S = S + 1 

NEXT: GOTO 90 

CLOSE4;CLOSE2:SYS52 639: 

PRINTCHRS(142)CHR5 (19)C 

HRS (19)CHR9 (147) :END 

R=0:FORZ=1TORS-S: IFZ=lT 

HENPRINT#4,""SPC(LS) ; 

PRINT#4,AS(3) ; :NEX'r;J = l 

PRINT#4:IFS=0THENPRINT: 

LS=LM:RS=81-(LM+M) :RETU 

RN 

F0RY=1T0S: PRINTCKRS (20) 

; :NEXT: IFL=55THENPRINT# 

2,CHRS (12) : PRINT: PRI NTT 

AB(LM)PS;:L=e 

PRINT; PRINTCHR$ (18)L+1C 

HRS(146)CHR$ (157)TAB(LM 

); 

F0RV=RS-(S-1)T0RS:AS (J) 
=A$ (V) ;PRINTAS (J) ; :J=J + 
1:NEXT:LS=LM:RS=81-(LH+ 
M) : RETURN 

PRINTCHR5(18)LCHRS (14 6) 
CHR$ ( 157 ) TAB (LS ) ; : RETUR 
N 
SYS 6 552 0, , , ,I:RREG,G,H: 



IFB=0ANDC=0ANDR=0THENB$ 

"" QK TO SELECT 

{2 SPACER}":ELSE540 
QJ 520 IFX>1THENB5=" DO NOT SE 

LECT{3 SPACES}" 
QF 530 IFX>1ANDX<22ANDSP=XTHEN 

B$="INDENT COUNT"+STRS( 

X-1)+CHR$(32) 
SR 540 PRINTCHR$ (19)CHR$ (1S)B5 

CHR$(146) ; :SYS65520, ,G, 

H,0: RETURN 
RE 550 IFER=30THENRESUME:ELSEP 

RINT:PRINTERR5(ER)EL:ST 

OP 

Robert Nellist, the author of Ancestry 
(January 1993), is an avid letter writer 
He lives in Brockport, New York. 

DOUBLE DUB 1541 

By Daniel Lightner 

With tliis utility program and two 1541 
disk drives, you can make duplicate cop- 
ies of any disk that doesn't contain copy 
protection. 

Double Dub 1541 is written in machine 
language, but it loads and runs like a BA- 
SIC program. To enter it, use MLX, our ma- 
chine language entry program, See "Typ- 
ing Aids" elsewhere in this section. When 
MLX prompts, respond with the following 
addresses. 

Startinci address: 0801 
Ending address; 0D53 

Be sure to save a copy of the program 
before you exit MLX. 

Copying Disks 

When you run Double Dub 1541, it 
prompts you to place the source disk 
in disk drive number 8. This is the disk 
that you wish to copy. Place the disk in 
drive 8 and press the space bar. At 
this point Double Dub 1541 reads the 
disk name and ID. 

It then prompts you to place the tar- 
get disk in drive 9. Put a blank disk in 
drive 9 and press the space bar. 
There is no need to use a formatted 
disk. Double Dub 1541 automatically for- 
mats the disk for you and copies the 
contents of the disk in drive 8 to the 
disk in drive 9. The screen will blank 
while the actual copying is. taking 
place. 

The program will inform you when 
the copy is complete. You will be 
asked if you wish to make more cop- 



ies. If you do, tap the Y key. If you 
don't, tap the N, and Double Dub 1541 
returns you to BASIC. 



DOUBLE DUB 

9801:33 08 

0309:31 30 

9811:D3 8D 

0819 :CC FF 

0821:20 8D 

0329:10 0B 

0331 :6F 8 5 

08 39 :B9 3 9 

0341:06 D0 

0349:20 Bl 

0351:93 FF 

0859:A8 FF 

0861:AE FF 

0369:30 A2 

0871:F0 04 

0879:12 D0 



08811 
0889; 



E8 A0 
03 E8 



0891:34 03 
0899:32 20 
38M:5A 0B 
08A9:20 45 
08B1:0D 20 
08B9:FF A9 
03C1:A0 00 
0aC9:ca C0 
0301:20 AE 
08D9:A0 03 
03E1:C8 CB 
08E9:A2 03 
08F1:B1 FF 
08F9:FF A0 
0901:FF C3 
0909:FF A2 
0911:89 55 
0919:00 D0 
0921:A9 6F 
0929:30 89 
0931:C0 07 
0939:AE FF 
a941:CD CB 
0949:CD C7 
0951:E8 BE 
0959:4C AF 
0961:09 4C 
0969:35 08 
0971:80 CF 
0979:69 01 
0981:80 CF 
0989:FF A9 
3991:20 A5 
0999:00 30 
09A1:C9 30 
09A9:08 20 
09B1:20 96 
09B9:02 C9 
09C1:3D El 
09C9iAB FF 
a9Dl:A0 02 
09D9:C8 C9 
09E1:A9 08 
09E9:20.CC 
09F1:A9 ID 
09F9:A0 00 



1541 

C8 07 
00 00 
21 D0 
A9 FF 
B2 02 
A9 08 
B9 20 
0C 20 
F5 20 
FF A9 
A0 00 
C3 C0 
A2 02 
00 20 
9D 38 
F0 A9 
00 20 
CS C0 
A2 00 
C3 FF 
20 66 
9B 4C 
91 0B 
6F 85 
B9 40 

07 D0 
FF A2 
20 CF 
00 D0 
20 C9 
A9 6F 
00 89 
C0 07 
03 20 
0D 20 
F5 A9 
85 B9 
54 0C 
D0 F5 
20 85 
02 D0 
02 D0 
54 0D 

08 4C 
B5 08 
13 AD 
02 60 
8D CD 
02 60 
6F 85 
FF 8D 
23 AS 
D0 2C 
B4 FF 
FF 2 
33 00 
02 C9 
20 A5 
20 A5 
3D 00 
20 C3 
FF A9 
20 D2 
B9 E3 



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32 


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54 


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40 


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02 


69 


01 


90 


18 


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CD 


02 


99 


2 


18 


A9 


00 


02 


A9 


09 


20 


B4 


FA 


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20 


96 


FF 


C7 


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02 


C9 


30 


08 


FF 


8D 


El 


02 


7A 


4C 


AB 


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A9 


3C 


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6F 


85 


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2E 


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80 


E0 


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20 


A5 


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36 


33 


D0 


09 


4C 


13 


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8D 


El 


02 


0C 


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99 


E0 


02 


3D 


F5 


20 


AB 


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F8 


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20 


A6 


OA 


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0D 


20 


D2 


FF 


68 


FF 


20 


D2 


FF 


77 


02 


20 


D2 


FF 


D7 



0A01 
0A09 
0A11 
0A19 
0A21 
0A29 
0A31 
0A39 
0A41 
0A49 
0A51 
0A59 
0A'61 
0A69 
0A71 
0A79 
0A81 
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0A91 
3A99 
aAAl 
0AA9 
0AB1 
3AB9 
0AC1 
0AC9 
0AD1 
0AD9 
OAEl 
0AE9 
0AF1 
0AF9 
0B01 
3B09 
0B11 
0B19 
0B21 
9029 
0B31 
0B39 
0B41 
3B49 
3B51 
0B59 
0B61 
0B69 
0B71 
0B79 
0B81 
0B89 
0B91 
0B99 
0BA1 
0BA9 
OBBl 
BBB9 
0BCI 
0BC9 
08D1 
0BD9 
08E1 
0BE9 
0BF1 
0BF9 
0C01 
0009 
00 11 
0C19 
0021 
0029 



:C8 09 00 
:68 A0 17 
:02 A9 00 
:B9 FB 02 
:B0 02 DO 
:FF AE CF 
:0B A0 00 
:FF 03 CO 
:A0 00 89 
:C8 CO 2D 
:C9 20 D0 
:94 00 20 
:D0 F5 40 
: 29 EF 8D 
:B1 FF A9 
:FF A0 00 
:FF 08 CO 
:FF A9 09 
:8S B9 20 
:62 3C 20 
:D0 F5 40 
:C3 FF A9 
:0O 20 09 
:FF AD 11 
:D9 A9 8 
:35 B9 23 
:65 00 23 
:D0 F5 20 
:B1 FF A9 
;FF A0 00 
:FF 08 00 
:FF 20 A6 
:0C 20 D2 
:F5 20 E4 
:C9 4E FO 
:40 OA 08 
:08 AO 00 
:FF 08 00 
:31 A2 38 
:A9 92 A2 
:FF 4C 03 
:A3 0C 20 
:09 A0 03 
:FF A9 4E 
:8D 36 03 
:13 AD 34 
:03 AD 34 
:23 BD FF 
:0F 2 BA 
:0F 20 03 
:BD IC 0C 
:02 BD 23 
:2A 00 30 
:BD 31 00 
:B4 02 8E 
:B0 02 A2 
:B0 AD B3 
:B4 02 FD 
:B4 02 AO 
:8D B3 02 
;F0 11 09 
:02 20 B5 
:02 F0 05 
:CA 10 04 
:64 00 E8 
:02 AC BO 
:20 FO 04 
:B1 02 60 
:1A IF 08 
: 23 00 00 



D0 F5 
40 FF 
20 30 
20 A8 
F4 A9 

02 A9 
B9 FB 
BO 02 
63 00 
00 F5 
F9 63 
D2 FF 
4E 0A 
11 D0 
6F 85 
89 62 
3 D0 
20 Bl 
9 3 FF 
A8 FF 
AE FF 

03 20 
FF A2 
00 09 
20 Bl 
9 3 FF 
A8 FF 
AE FF 
6F 85 
B9 65 
03 DO 
OA A0 
FF C8 
FF C9 

07 09 
40 E2 
B9 F3 
61 00 
A0 00 

08 AO 
FF A9 
BD PP 
20 BA 
8D 35 
A9 3A 
03 69 
03 A2 
A9 0F 
FF 20 
FF 20 
80 05 

00 8D 

09 02 
80 OB 
B3 02 

09 8E 
02 DD 
FO OB 
B3 02 
08 DO 
B0 F0 

02 30 
29 7F 
60 01 

03 10 
02 99 
C3 8C 

01 09 

10 11 
00 00 



68 68 
0A AE 
OS A0 
FF 08 
20 20 
00 20 

02 20 
D0 F4 
20 D2 
20 E4 
A3 30 
08 00 
AD 11 
A9 08 
B9 20 
9C 20 
F5 20 
FF A9 
A0 09 
08 C0 
A9 02 

03 FF 
00 20 

10 30 
FF A9 
A0 00 
08 00 
A9 09 

89 20 
0C 20 
F5 40 
00 B9 
C0 33 
00 F0 
59 F3 
PC 40 

00 20 
F5 60 
20 BD 

02 20 

01 A2 
A9 03 
FF 40 

03 A9 
8D 37 
03 3D 
35 AO 
A2 09 
00 FF 
AS 09 

02 8D 
C7 02 
8D CF 

02 60 
A2 00 
B5 02 
FC 08 

90 OF 
FD FC 
E3 98 

03 8D 
05 AD 
20 07 
00 0A 
27 80 
FB 02 
B0 02 

11 12 
18 19 
00 00 



68 25 
CD 74 
30 85 
CO EE 
A8 2E 
B0 41 
A8 5F 
60 01 
FF E9 
FF 9E 
B9 4B 
2D BD 
DO 03 
20 2E 
93 71 
A8 7D 
AE 5D 
6F 7B 
B9 50 
03 18 
20 DA 
A2 B7 
C6 23 
11 ID 
6F FB 
B9 38 
03 Dl 
20 9B 
93 El 
A8 06 
AE 26 
C0 04 
D0 FF 
F9 E8 
06 09 

18 89 
D2 El 
A9 68 
FF DD 
BA 81 
38 51 
A2 El 
00 A5 
30 B5 
03 40 
34 54 
03 59 
AO 5F 
A9 20 
60 BD 
CD 07 
BD 92 
02 06 
80 F9 
SE D8 
A0 70 
AD D8 
8D A0 
0B C0 
CA 82 
B5 5D 
B2 36 
00 0F 
00 34 
Bl 30 
09 0E 
AC 5A 

19 70 
IE 49 
00 02 



0031: 
0039: 
0C41: 
0049: 
0051: 
0059: 
0C61: 
0C69: 
0071: 
0079: 
0C81: 
0089; 
0C91i 
00991 
0CA1; 
0OA9; 
0CB1; 
0OB9; 
0001; 
0009; 
0CD1: 
0CD9; 
0CE1: 
0CE9; 
0CFl! 
0CF9; 
0D01: 
OD09; 
0011; 
0D19: 
0D21: 
0D29: 
0D31. 
0D39; 
0041: 
0D49; 
0051; 



14 14 
55 31 

38 20 
20 31 
20 30 
30 20 

30 55 
9A 20 
4F 55 

49 53 

52 49 

50 52 

41 43 
54 20 
54 29 
49 4E 
20 39 

53 20 
96 20 

43 4F 

44 20 
20 20 
4E 4F 
4F 50 
4E OD 
4F 55 

42 42 

31 0D 
59 52 

39 39 
4D 50 
42 4C 
4E 53 

40 54 
40 20 
20 52 
44 OD 



14 12 
20 32 
30 42 
34 34 
20 55 
42 2D 

49 2D 

50 55 

52 43 
4B 20 
56 45 
45 53 
45 00 
IC 54 
9A 44 
20 44 
20 10 

53 50 

20 43 
4D 50 

21 21 
4D 41 

54 48 
59 3F 
96 93 
4 2 4C 
45 52 
9A 20 
49 47 
33 00 

55 54 
49 43 
23 49 

44 00 
52 49 

45 53 
00 FF 



11 11 
20 30 
2D 50 
55 31 
32 20 
50 20 
55 49 
54 20 
45 20 
49 4E 

20 38 
53 20 
9A 20 
41 52 

49 53 
52 49 

50 52 
41 43 
4F 50 
4C 45 

21 0D 
4B 45 
45 52 
20 IC 
0D 20 
45 20 
20 31 
20 43 
48 54 
20 20 
45 20 
41 54 
4E 54 
20 20 
47 43 
45 52 
EA 00 



10 23 00 

20 31 A2 
20 32 04 
20 32 69 

33 20 77 
33 20 36 
2B 0D 16 
IC 53 E4 
9A 44 29 
20 44 7E 
20 10 72 
53 50 4E 

53 55 OF 
47 45 D3 
4B 20 01 
56 45 EB 
45 53 97 
45 00 Al 
59 20 F3 

54 45 6B 
00 9A 30 
20 41 B8 
20 43 FA 
59 2F 30 
20 44 ED 
44 55 A4 
35 34 FE 
4F 50 51 
20 31 OF 
4 3 4F AC 
50 55 86 
49 4F 12 
4C 20 50 
41 40 38 
54 53 BF 
56 45 4B 
00 00 09 



Daniel C. Lightner is a prolific program- 
mer who lives in Sidney, Montana. 



EXPLORER 64 



By Michael Bolin 

You look around furtively, hoping to see 
a passage through the tangled mass of 
rocks and trees. Suddenly you spy a 
opening in the bushes. You dash 
through it and pounce on the yellow 
stone lying on the ground. There! You've 
finally managed to recover that jewel. 
Now it's time to explore another maze to 
find the next jewel. 

Explorer is a one-player game for the 
64 written entirely in machine language. 
To enter it, use MLX, COMPUTE'S ma- 
chine language entry program. When 
MUX prompts, respond with the following 
addresses. 

Starting address: COOO 
Ending address: C9SF 

Be sure to save a copy of the program 
before you exit MLX. 

OCTOBER 1993 COMPUTE G-37 



PROGRAMS 



Into the Maie 

Load Explorer with the .8.1 extension 
and then run it by typing SYS 49152. 
You'll be presented with a menu. Use 
a joystick plugged into port 2 to move 
the green arrow up and down the 
menu. Press the fire button to select 
your option. 

The first time you select Play from 
the menu, don't be surprised if you see 
a window filled with gray @ symbols 
and reversed Commodore B charac- 
ters. This is because these characters 
normally are in memory after you turn 
on the computer. 

You'll also see a purple diamond in 
the center of this window. This dia- 
mond indicates the position of your ex- 
plorer. You can move the diamond 
across a huge map. 

The two numbers in the upper left of 
the screen indicate your explorer's stat- 
us. If either of these numbers reaches 
0, the game is over. 

On the map, you may encounter char- 
acters that raise or lower your statis- 
tics. Other characters will stop your 
movement completely, kill you on 
touch, speed you up, slow you down, 
or slow you only when you are touch- 
ing them. If you touch a certain char- 
acter, your player collects the jewel 
and wins the game. To exit a game, 
pull down on the joystick and simulta- 
neously press the fire button. 

Other Menu Selections 

If you select Edit from the menu, a win- 
dow twice as large as the playing win- 
dow will appear with a purple diamond 
in the center. This will let you design 
your own screens to explore. 

All 256 characters in the character 
set appear in the upper left of the 
screen. One of the characters (usually 
the ball) will be highlighted. Use the 
joystick to move around the map. 
Press the fire button to place the high- 
lighted character on the screen be- 
neath the cursor. 

In the editing mode, press Q to se- 
lect a different character. This shifts 
joystick control from the playing 
screen to the character table. You can 
now move the joystick to select differ- 
ent characters. Then, when you press 
the fire button, that character will ap- 
pear onscreen. If you hold down ttie 
fire button while moving the joystick, 

G-38 COMPUTE OCTOBER 1993 



you can place a continuous string of 
characters onscreen. 

Press Q again and notice that the cur- 
sor stops blinking. You can now 
change character color by pressing 
the back-arrow key Notice that all like 
characters onscreen will change to the 
new color. You can return to the menu 
at any time by tapping the A key 

Stop, Go, Destroy 

From the editor screen, press the 
space bar to change the attributes of 
the highlighted character. You have a 
choice of eight possible actions that 
will occur whenever your game charac- 
ter makes contact. You can choose to 
stop movement, reduce food, reduce 
life, disappear, destroy, speed up, 
slow down, or slow temporarily A plus 
sign following the action name indi- 
cates that it's active; a minus sign 
means that it's turned off. Press the ap- 
propriate number key to toggle the 
plus and minus signs. Press A when 
the character is the way you want it. 

Select Save from the menu to save 
your current game. The program will 
ask for a filename. The character attrib- 
utes are saved along with the map. 
The map is huge, so be sure you have 
at least 93 blocks free on your disk. 

Select Load to load a previously 
saved game. When the game prompts 
you for a filename, insert the disk on 
which you have saved a game, type in 
the filename, and press Return. You 
can then play the game or edit it. 

Quit returns you to BASIC, but you 
may return to the game by typing SYS 
49152. Since the game resets an impor- 
tant BASIC pointer, it's better to reset 
the computer when you've finished. 

More Control 

When you have designed a game, se- 
lect Quit from the menu. You can now 
select the character that you need to lo- 
cate to win. Select this character by en- 
tering POKE 51550, character. For the 
designated character, enter any of the 
Commodore screen characters. 

Here are some other POKEs to alter 
gameplay. Remember to enter values 
between 1 and 255 when poking num- 
bers for speed, food, and life. 
Starting speed: POKE 51547, speed 
Starting food: POKE 51549, food 
Starting life: POKE 51548. life 



Character to increase food: POKE 

51582, character 

Character to increase life: POKE 

51583, character 

Character that appears when you hit a 
character that has the Disappear op- 
tion on: POKE 51572, character 

When you've finished customizing 
your game, type SYS 49152 to return 
to the action. 

Design 

To construct interesting adventure 
screens, you need to use the right 
characters and colors. For example, 
change the cursor color to green and 
then press Shift-Q to make symbols for 
a forest. The following key and color 
suggestions should help. 

Water: blue reverse Space 
Path: brown Commodore key-+ 
Bricks: red reverse Shift-® 
Lava: pink Shift-V 
Plain: yellow semicolon (;) 
Field: green Shift-3 

Explorer is compact, using only 2448 
bytes of memory at 49152 ($C000), but 
it gives you an infinite number of 
games— thanks to its editor. It's fun to 
create a great adventure and then let 
someone who hasn't seen it play it. 

EXPLORER 



0003 


A9 


00 


8D 


06 


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28 


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C9 


4F 


C540 


:36 


CS 


40 


BE 


04 


A9 


2B 


3D 


A6 


C0E3: 


C9 


AC 


5A 


C9 


Bl 


02 


91 


04 


IF 


0318 


FF 


FO 


03 


8D 


58 


09 


A9 


FF 


52 


C548 


B4 


04 


A9 


08 


23 


86 


05 


40 


D7 


C0F0: 


85 


0A 


98 


48 


A4 


0A 


B9 


08 


D8 


0320 


SD 


05 


06 


60 


AD 


05 


C6 


8D 


5E 


€550 


:BE 


04 


A9 


2B 


8D 


DC 


04 


A9 


E5 


C0F8: 


ce 


85 


0A 


68 


A8 


AS 


0A 


91 


88 


0328 


58 


09 


09 


01 


FO 


09 


CE 


05 


Ae 


0553 


10 


20 


86 


05 


40 


BE 


04 


A9 


Bl 


C100: 


06 


88 


19 


E8 


BA 


48 


A2 


02 


P5 


C330 


06 


AD 


05 


06 


8D 


58 


09 


60 


6D 


C560 


2B 


8D 


04 


05 


A9 


20 


20 


86 


4A 


C108: 


A9 


96 


20 


9E 


C6 


A2 


04 


A9 


66 


0338 


AD 


C5 


06 


80 


58 


09 


C9 


FF 


37 


0568 


05 


40 


BE 


04 


A9 


2B 


8D 


20 


4F 


C110: 


28 


20 


9E 


C6 


A2 


06 


A9 


28 


98 


C340 


F0 


F5 


EE 


05 


C6 


AD 


05 


06 


37 


C570 


05 


A9 


40 


20 


86 


05 


40 


BE 


95 


CllS: 


20 


9E 


C6 


68 


AA 


CA 


10 


G9 


10 


0348 


8D 


53 


09 


60 


A9 


19 


8D 


C5 


7E 


CS73 


04 


A9 


2B 


80 


54 


35 


A9 


80 


99 


C120: 


60 


A9 


26 


85 


04 


A9 


05 


85 


Bl 


0350 


C6 


20 


44 


E5 


29 


E3 


00 


A9 


E5 


0580 


20 


86 


C5 


40 


BE 


04 


85 


0A 


59 


C128: 


05 


A9 


26 


85 


06 


A9 


D9 


35 


05 


0358 


5A 


8D 


F3 


05 


A9 


04 


SD 


F3 


AB 


0583 


AO 


40 


9D 


B9 


40 


90 


45 


0A 


D2 


C130: 


07 


A9 


00 


85 


02 


A9 


40 


85 


B6 


0360 


D9 


AO 


90 


98 


99 


00 


04 


A9 


05 


CS90 


99 


40 


90 


60 


85 


06 


40 


54 


06 


C138: 


03 


AD 


C7 


C6 


FO 


0F 


A8 


A5 


08 


0368 


31 


99 


00 


D8 


88 


D0 


F4 


AC 


82 


C598 


03 


A2 


A9 


A9 


06 


20 


84 


06 


74 


C140: 


02 


18 


69 


96 


85 


02 


90 


02 


B8 


0370 


08 


07 


89 


C8 


06 


99 


90 


D8 


87 


C5A0 


A9 


0B 


85 


FB 


A9 


04 


85 


FC 


99 


C148: 


E6 


03 


88 


D0 


F2 


A5 


02 


18 


68 


0378 


A9 


00 


85 


06 


20 


78 


06 


AD 


10 


05A8 


A9 


IF 


A0 


00 


91 


FB 


20 


78 


lA 


C150' 


6D 


C6 


C6 


85 


02 


90 


02 


E6 


AA 


0380 


00 


DC 


85 


02 


29 


01 


F9 


2E 


6D 


C5B0 


06 


AD 


00 


DC 


09 


7D 


F0 


0E 


0D 


C158: 


03 


60 


A9 


5A 


8D 


78 


05 


A9 


52 


0388 


A5 


02 


29 


02 


F0 


2B 


A5 


02 


2A 


C5Ba 


09 


7E 


F0 


20 


C9 


6F 


FO 


32 


09 


C160 


04 


80 


78 


D9 


A0 


FF 


AD 


00 


56 


C399 


29 


04 


FO 


2E 


AS 


02 


29 


08 


3E 


0500 


40 


A8 


05 


40 


A8 


05 


A5 


FB 


BD 


C168- 


DC 


C9 


7F 


D0 


03 


88 


D0 


F6 


90 


0398 


F0 


25 


A5 


02 


29 


10 


F0 


10 


3E 


C5C8 


09 


AB 


F3 


F7 


A9 


20 


AO 


00 


D0 


C170 


C9 


7E 


F0 


20 


C9 


7D 


F0 


23 


El 


C3A0 


A5 


05 


09 


30 


F0 


IF 


09 


3E 


3F 


C5D0 


91 


FB 


A5 


PB 


18 


69 


23 


85 


04 


C178 


C9 


77 


F0 


26 


09 


7B 


F0 


29 


86 


C3A8 


F3 


24 


09 


9A 


F0 


ID 


40 


54 


74 


C5D8 


FB 


4C 


C3 


05 


A5 


FB 


09 


OB 


06 


C180 


C9 


6D 


F8 


0B 


A9 


00 


80 


73 


EE 


C3B0 


03 


D0 


Al 


40 


00 


00 


40 


04 


B4 


CSE0 


F0 


El 


A3 


00 


A9 


20 


91 


FB 


5E 


C188 


ca 


8D 


74 


C8 


4C 


D0 


C2 


68 


82 


C3B8 


03 


40 


DF 


03 


4C 


EF 


03 


40 


63 


C5E8 


A5 


FB 


33 


E9 


28 


85 


FB 


40 


87 


C190 


68 


4C 


08 


C0 


A0 


81 


A2 


00 


B8 


C3C0 


88 


04 


40 


15 


04 


20 


95 


C4 


EE 


O5F0 


03 


05 


A5 


FB 


09 


AB 


F0 


OF 


32 


CX98 


4C 


AD 


CI 


A0 


01 


A2 


00 


40 


CE 


C3C8 


40 


4C 


03 


40 


08 


00 


20 


23 


6D 


C5F8 


09 


83 


F0 


13 


09 


5B 


F0 


12 


49 


C1A0 


AD 


CI 


A0 


00 


A2 


01 


4C 


AD 


DE 


C3D0 


04 


40 


54 


03 


AD 


C7 


06 


F0 


9F 


0600 


09 


33 


F0 


11 


40 


42 


00 


A 9 


95 


C1A8 


CI 


A0 


00 


A2 


81 


AD 


05 


06 


74 


C3D3 


13 


CE 


07 


06 


40 


BE 


03 


AD 


04 


0608 


01 


8D 


86 


02 


4C 


44 


E5 


40 


F5 


C1B0 


C9 


FF 


F0 


06 


AD 


05 


C6 


8D 


37 


C3E0 


07 


06 


09 


90 


F0 


06 


EE 


07 


35 


0610 


20 


06 


40 


37 


C6 


A9 


00 


8D 


06 


ClBS 


58 


C9 


AD 


C6 


C6 


8D 


6F 


08 


11 


C3E3 


06 


40 


8E 


03 


40 


54 


C3 


20 


53 


0618 


06 


06 


8D 


07 


06 


40 


40 


03 


AO 


C1C0 


8D 


71 


C8 


AD 


C7 


C6 


8D 


70 


40 


O3F0 


21 


01 


A0 


05 


A2 


02 


A9 


97 


E5 


0620 


20 


46 


C6 


A9 


F2 


35 


FB 


A9 


12 


C1C8 


C8 


8D 


72 


C8 


8E 


73 


C8 


8C 


4F 


03FB 


20 


9E 


06 


88 


D0 


F6 


AD 


08 


29 


0623 


42 


35 


FC 


A9 


FB 


A2 


40 


A9 


FD 


C1D0 


74 


ca 


AD 


73 


C8 


30 


03 


F0 


B5 


0400 


07 


A9 


00 


91 


02 


40 


54 


03 


50 


0630 


9D 


20 


D8 


FF 


40 


08 


00 


20 


D3 


C1D8 


09 


EE 


6F 


C8 


4C 


E2 


01 


CE 


57 


0498 


AO 


06 


06 


09 


90 


F0 


11 


EE 


E3 


0633 


46 


C6 


A9 


00 


A2 


F2 


AO 


42 


34 


C1E0 


6F 


C8 


AD 


74 


ca 


30 


03 


F0 


53 


,0419 


06 


06 


40 


9A 


03 


AD 


06 


06 


0B 


0640 


20 


05 


FF 


40 


08 


CO 


A2 


61 


02 


C1E8 


09 


EE 


70 


C8 


40 


F2 


01 


CE 


07 


0418 


Fa 


06 


OE 


06 


06 


40 


9A 


03 


42 


0648 


A9 


08 


20 


34 


06 


20 


63 


A5 


01 


C1F3 


70 


C8 


AD 


6F 


ca 


09 


94 


FO 


13 


C420 


40 


54 


03 


A0 


00 


98 


99 


09 


FC 


0650 


A9 


00 


B9 


00 


02 


F0 


06 


99 


DE 


C1F8 


15 


C9 


02 


F0 


11 


3D 


06 


06 


DB 


0428 


04 


A9 


01 


99 


00 


D8 


38 


D0 


ID 


0658 


80 


09 


08 


DO 


F5 


00 


00 


F3 


62 


C200 


AD 


70 


C8 


C9 


94 


F0 


07 


09 


6E 


C430 


F4 


AO 


03 


07 


B9 


03 


C6 


99 


00 


0669 


E5 


09 


11 


B0 


El 


98 


48 


A9 


E9 


C20a 


2 


F0 


03 


8D 


07 


C6 


20 


21 


BE 


0438 


00 


08 


29 


78 


06 


AD 


00 


DO 


4D 


0663 


01 


A2 


08 


A0 


00 


20 


BA 


FF 


20 


C210 


CI 


A0 


02 


A2 


02 


A9 


97 


20 


0F 


0440 


09 


7E 


F0 


32 


09 


6F 


F0 


3A 


B7 


0673 


68 


A2 


80 


A0 


09 


4C 


BD 


FF 


EF 


C2ia 


9E 


C6 


aa 


D0 


F6 


A0 


00 


AD 


A4 


0448 


C9 


7D 


F9 


37 


09 


77 


F0 


3F 


F4 


0678 


AE 


05 


06 


AO 


00 


88 


00 


FD 


73 


C220 


71 


ce 


8D 


C6 


C6 


AD 


72 


08 


49 


C450 


09 


7B 


F0 


10 


A5 


05 


09 


39 


3E 


0680 


CA 


D0 


F8 


60 


8E 


80 


06 


80 


91 


C22S 


8D 


C7 


C6 


Bl 


02 


CD 


5E 


09 


28 


0458 


D0 


E3 


AE 


C8 


C7 


FE 


08 


06 


38 


0688 


SE 


C6 


AO 


09 


B9 


FF 


FF 


FO 


El 


C230 


D0 


05 


A9 


02 


8D 


57 


09 


Bl 


03 


0460 


29 


E3 


00 


A9 


5A 


3D 


F3 


05 


9B 


C690 


OC 


20 


D2 


FF 


C3 


D0 


F5 


EE 


EA 


C238 


02 


CD 


7E 


C9 


D0 


06 


EE 


75 


90 


0468 


A9 


04 


3D 


F3 


D9 


40 


23 


04 


03 


C698 


aE 


06 


40 


BO 


06 


60 


18 


75 


CE 


C240 


C8 


20 


06 


03 


Bl 


02 


CD 


7F 


DF 


0470 


CE 


08 


07 


40 


23 


04 


AD 


08 


Al 


C6A0 


00 


95 


00 


B9 


01 


60 


P6 


01 


17 


C248 


.C9 


D0 


96 


EE 


6D 


C3 


20 


06 


6B 


0478 


07 


38 


E9 


28 


8D 


03 


C7 


40 


IF 


C6A8 


60 


IE 


93 


9F 


50 


40 


41 


59 


E9 


C250 


:C3 


AS 


B9 


40 


9C 


29 


01 


F0 


99 


0480 


23 


04 


60 


AD 


08 


07 


18 


69 


B2 


C6B0 


0D 


45 


44 


49 


54 


0D 


40 


4F 


Fl 


C258 


:03 


29 


El 


C2 


B9 


40 


90 


29 


01 


0438 


23 


8D 


08 


07 


40 


23 


04 


EE 


86 


C6B8 


41 


44 


0D 


53 


41 


56 


45 


OD 


09 


C260 


:02 


F0 


03 


20 


EE 


C2 


B9 


40 


BB 


0490 


C8 


07 


40 


23 


04 


A9 


01 


80 


88 


0600 


51 


55 


49 


54 


00 


00 


00 


00 


BA 


C268 


.9C 


29 


04 


Fa 


03 


20 


FO 


02 


6D 


0498 


86 


02 


20 


44 


E5 


AD 


08 


07 


6D 


0608 


0F 


0F 


0F 


0F 


3F 


OF 


OF' 


0F 


56 


C270 


B9 


40 


9C 


29 


08 


F0 


03 


20 


33 


O4A0 


8D 


40 


9D 


A2 


09 


A0 


G7 


20 


5F 


C6D0 


0F 


0F 


0F 


OF 


OF 


OF 


OF 


OF 


5E 


C278 


.06 


C3 


B9 


43 


9C 


29 


la 


FO 


07 


04A8 


84 


06 


A9 


90 


AE 


40 


90 


20 


2D 


C6Da 


9F 


OF 


OF 


OF 


OF 


OF 


0F 


0F 


66 


C280 


03 


20 


0E 


C3 


B9 


40 


90 


29 


BE 


04B9 


CD 


BD 


A9 


0D 


20 


D2 


FF 


A2 


85 


C6E0 


0F 


0F 


0F 


OF 


OF 


OP 


0F 


0F 


6E 


C288 


■20 


F3 


03 


20 


24 


03 


B9 


40 


A0 


04B8 


DE 


A0 


07 


20 


84 


06 


A9 


30 


A3 


C6E8: 


9F 


0F 


0F 


OF 


0F 


0F 


0F 


9F 


76 


C290 


:9C 


29 


40 


F0 


33 


20 


38 


C3 


92 


0409 


85 


FB 


A9 


94 


85 


FO 


A9 


01 


F5 


06F9 


0F 


OF 


0F 


OF 


0F 


0F 


OF 


9F 


7E 


C298 


:B9 


40 


9C 


29 


80 


FO 


06 


20 


25 


0408 


35 


8 


AC 


40 


9D 


B9 


49 


90 


Al 


06F8: 


OF 


0F 


0F 


0F 


0F 


0F 


OF 


0F 


86 


C2A0 


14 


03 


4C 


AB 


02 


AD 


58 


09 


AC 


O4D0 


25 


08 


F0 


09 


A9 


2B 


A0 


00 


D8 


0703- 


OF 


0F 


0F 


0F 


0F 


0F 


0F 


0F 


8F 


C2A8 


.8D 


C5 


C6 


Bl 


02 


09 


E0 


D0 


24 


04D8 


91 


FB 


40 


E3 


04 


A9 


2D 


AO 


B9 


0708 


OF 


9F 


0F 


0F 


OF 


OF 


0F 


OF 


97 


C2B0 


03 


EE 


75 


C8 


AD 


6F 


08 


09 


35 


C4E9 


00 


91 


FB 


A2 


FB 


A9 


28 


20 


6F 


0710- 


OF 


0F 


9F 


OF 


OF 


0F 


OF 


0F 


9F 


C2B8 


:94 


F0 


07 


C9 


02 


FO 


03 


3D 


A9 


C4E3 


9E 


C6 


18 


06 


08 


99 


DB 


A9 


BA 


0718: 


OF 


OF 


OF 


0F 


0F 


OF 


0F 


OF 


A7 


C2C0 


:C6 


C6 


AD 


70 


C8 


C9 


94 


F0 


9F 


C4F0 


00 


85 


C6 


A5 


06 


F0 


FO 


A5 


A8 


C720: 


0F 


OF 


OF 


OP 


0F 


0F 


0F 


OF 


AF 


C2C3 


:07 


C9 


02 


F0 


03 


8D 


07 


06 


38 


C4Fa 


05 


09 


38 


FO 


21 


C9 


3B 


FO 


85 


0728: 


0F 


OF 


OF 


OF 


9F 


9F 


0F 


OF 


B7 


C2D0 


:AD 


75 


C8 


D0 


03 


20 


BE 


03 


29 


C500 


2A 


09 


08 


FO 


33 


09 


0B 


F0 


EA 


0730: 


0F 


OF 


OF 


0F 


0F 


0F 


0F 


0F 


BF 


C2D8 


:CE 


76 


C8 


D0 


03 


CE 


75 


C8 


90 


C508 


30 


09 


10 


FO 


45 


09 


13 


F0 


9D 


0733: 


0F 


0F 


OF 


0F 


0F 


OF. 


OF 


0P 


07 


C2E0 


:e0 


AD 


71 


C8 


8D 


6F 


08 


AD 


26 


C510 


4E 


C9 


18 


FO 


57 


09 


IB 


F0 


50 


0740: 


3F 


0F 


0F 


ap 


OP 


OF 


OF 


0F 


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C2E8 


:72 


C8 


3D 


70 


08 


60 


AD 


75 


2B 


0518 


60 


C9 


0A 


D0 


D6 


60 


A9 


2B 


4B 


0748: 


9F 


0F 


0F 


OF 


0F 


0F 


0F 


OF 


D7 


C2F0 


:C8 


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04 


CE 


75 


08 


60 


A9 


BD 


C520 


8D 


30 


04 


A9 


01 


20 


86 


05 


F7 


0750: 


9F 


0F 


OF 


OF 


OF 


0F 


0F 


9F 


DF 


C2F8 


:01 


8D 


57 


C9 


60 


AD 


6D 


08 


47 


0528 


40 


BE 


C4 


A9 


2B 


ao 


64 


04 


19 


0758: 


0F 


0F 


0F 


OF 


OF 


OF 


0F 


aF 


E7 


C300 


:F0 


F5 


CE 


6D 


C3 


60 


A0 


00 


37 


C530 


A9 


02 


20 


86 


05 


40 


BE 


04 


IF 


0763: 


0F 


BF 


OP 


OF 


0F 


OF 


OF 


9F 


EF 


C308 


:AD 


74 


C9 


91 


02 


60 


A9 


01 


BB 


0538 


A9 


2B 


8D 


8C 


04 


A9 


04 


20 


CO 


C768: 


0F 


OF 


0F 


OF 


0F 


OF 


OF 


0F 


F7 



OCTOBER 1993 COMPUTE G-39 



PROGRAMS 



C770 


:0F 


0F 


0F 


0F 


0F 


0F 


0F 


0F 


FF 


C778 


:0F 


0F 


0F 


0F 


0F 


0F 


0F 


0F 


08 


C780 


:0F 


0F 


0F 


gp 


0F 


0F 


0F 


0F 


10 


C788 


:0F 


0F 


0F 


0F 


0F 


0F 


0F 


0F 


18 


C790 


:0F 


0F 


0F 


0F 


0F 


0F 


0F 


0F 


20 


C798 


:0F 


0F 


0F 


0F 


0F 


0F 


OF 


0F 


28 


C7A0 


:0F 


0F 


0F 


0F 


0F 


0F 


0F 


OF 


30 


C7A8 


:9F 


0F 


0F 


0F 


0F 


0F 


OF 


OF 


38 


C7Ba 


:0F 


0F 


0F 


3F 


0F 


OF 


OF 


OF 


40 


C7B8 


:0F 


0F 


0F 


0F 


0P 


0F 


0F 


OF 


48 


C7C0 


:0F 


0F 


0P 


0F 


0F 


0F 


OF 


OF 


50 


C7ca 


:51 


05 


93 


43 


55 


52 


52 


45 


C6 


C7D0 


:4E 


54 


20 


43 


43 


41 


52 


41 


02 


C7Da 


43 


54 


45 


52 


3A 


00 


31 


2E 


4F 


C7E0 


:20 


53 


54 


4F 


50 


53 


20 


4D 


32 


C7E8 


4F 


56 


45 


4D 


45 


4E 


54 


9D 


4C 


C7F0 


32 


2E 


20 


52 


45 


44 


55 


43 


77 


C7F8 


45 


53 


20 


46 


4F 


4F 


44 


0D 


B5 


C800 


33 


2E 


20 


52 


45 


44 


55 


43 


09 


C8a8 


45 


53 


20 


4C 


49 


46 


45 


20 


E7 


C8ia 


0D 


34 


2E 


20 


44 


49 


53 


41 


2C 


C818 


50 


50 


45 


41 


52 


53 


20 


0D 


CF 


ca20 


35 


2E 


20 


44 


45 


53 


54 


52 


92 


C828 


4F 


59 


53 


20 


0D 


36 


2E 


20 


El 


C830 


53 


50 


45 


45 


44 


53 


20 


55 


81 


C838 


50 


20 


0D 


37 


2E 


20 


53 


4C 


F3 


C840 


4F 


57 


53 


20 


44 


4P 


57 


4E 


18 


C848 


20 


0D 


38 


2E 


20 


53 


4C 


4F 


4D 


C853 


57 


53 


20 


54 


45 


4D 


50 


4F 


PA 


C858 


52 


41 


52 


49 


4C 


59 


20 


OD 


57 


C860 


00 


05 


93 


46 


49 


4C 


45 


4E 


5E 


C868 


41 


4D 


45 


3A 


00 


00 


00 


00 


3A 


C870 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


FF 


05 


07 


C37a 


93 


59 


4F 


55 


20 


48 


41 


56 


64 


CS80 


45 


20 


46 


41 


49 


4C 


45 


44 


E3 


C888 


20 


59 


4F 


55 


52 


20 


51 


55 


CA 


C890 


45 


53 


54 


0D 


46 


4F 


52 


20 


29 


C89S 


54 


48 


45 


20 


4A 


45 


57 


45 


6C 


C8A0 


4C 


2E 


20 


50 


52 


45 


53 


53 


3E 


C8A8 


20 


41 


4E 


59 


20 


4B 


45 


59 


0C 


C8B0 


00 


05 


93 


59 


4F 


55 


20 


43 


E3 


CSBS 


41 


56 


45 


23 


53 


55 


43 


43 


E4 


C8C0 


45 


45 


44 


45 


44 


20 


49 


4E 


A6 


C8C8 


20 


52 


45 


54 


55 


52 


4E 


49 


C6 


C8D0 


4E 


47 


20 


54 


48 


45 


OD 


4A 


60 


caoa 


45 


57 


45 


4C 


2E 


20 


50 


52 


35 


C8E0 


45 


53 


53 


20 


41 


4E 


59 


20 


6C 


C8E8 


4B 


45 


59 


00 


9E 


93 


12 


20 


24 


caF0 


20 


23 


23 


20 


20 


20 


20 


54 


B6 


C8F8 


48 


45 


23 


51 


55 


4 5 


53 


54 


D3 


C900 


23 


20 


46 


4F 


52 


20 


54 


43 


6D 


C908 


45 


20 


4A 


45 


57 


45 


4C 


20 


6C 


C910 


20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


OD 


90 


C918 


0D 


59 


4F 


55 


20 


4D 


55 


53 


FB 


C920 


54 


20 


46 


49 


4E 


44 


20 


54 


5B 


C928 


48 


45 


20 


4A 


45 


57 


45 


4C 


38 


C930 


20 


57 


48 


49 


43 


48 


20 


49 


0C 


C938: 


53 


20 


4C 


4F 


53 


54 


20 


49 


71 


C940: 


4E 


00 


54 


48 


45 


20 


48 


55 


DD 


C948 


47 


45 


20 


57 


49 


4C 


44 


45 


93 


C950: 


52 


4E 


45 


53 


53 


2E 


00 


00 


Dl 


C95a 


90 


00 


00 


96 


64 


64 


5A 


00 


BE 


C960 


05 


13 


4C 


49 


46 


45 


3A 


20 


35 


C968- 


20 


20 


0D 


46 


4F 


4F 


44 


3A 


94 


C970 


20 


20 


20 


00 


20 


00 


00 


00 


21 


C97B 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


OC 


C98B 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


14 


C988 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


00 


IC 



Michael Botin lives in Rockwell, lowa.O 

G-40 COMPUTE OCTOBER 1993 



TYPING AIDS 

MLX, our machine language entry 
program for the 64 and 128, and 
The Automatic Proofreader are util- 
ities that help you type in Gazette pro- 
grams without making mistakes. To 
make room for more programs, we 
no longer include these labor-saving 
utilities in every issue, but they can 
be found on each Gazette Disk and 
are printed in all issues of Gazette 
through June 1990. 

If you don't have access to a 
back issue or to one of our disks, 
write to us, and we'll send you free 
printed copies of both of these 
handy programs for you to type in. 
We'll also include instructions on 
how to type in Gazette programs. 
Please enclose a self-addressed, 
stamped envelope. Send a self-ad- 
dressed disk mailer with appropriate 
postage to receive these programs 
on disk. 

Write to Typing Aids. COM- 
PUTE'S Gazette, 324 West Wen- 
dover Avenue, Suite 200, Greens- 
boro, North Carolina 27408. 



ATTENTION 

WRITERS 

PROGRAMMERS 

Gazette wants to purchase and pub- 
lish your utiities, applications, 
games, educational programs, and 
tutorial articles. If you've preated a 
program that you think other read- 
ers might enjoy or find useful, send 
it and the docunnentation on disk to 
the following address. 

Gazette Submissions Reviewer 
COMPUTE Publications 
324 W. Wendover, Ste. 200 
Greensboro, NC 27408 

Please enclose an SASE if you 
want to have your material returned. 



ONLY 

ON 

DISK 



In addition to the type-in pro- 
grams found in each issue of the 
magazine. Gazette Disk offers bo- 
nus programs. Here's a special 
program that you'll find only on 
this month's disk. 

Bowling Manager 

By Tim Rich 
Austin, TX 

Keeping track of your team's 
weekly bowling scores by hand 
can be a tedious and time-con- 
suming exercise, With Bowling 
fvlanager, you can use the pow- 
er of your 64 to keep track of a 
team's weekly statistics for an en- 
tire season. 

Once you've entered the 
players' names. Bowling fvlanag- 
er lets you enter and edit each 
bowler's score by name and 
date. You can then see a date- 
by-date listing of your team's per- 
formance. All statistical data is 
saved to disk for easy retrieval 
and editing. 

Bowling f\/!anager automati- 
cally computes a player's aver- 
age, tracks high and low scores, 
tracks high and low series, and 
more. This is a great program for 
any active bowler. 

You can have this program, 
our PD picks, and all the others 
that appear in this issue by order- 
ing the October Gazette Disk. 
The U.S. price is $9.95 plus 
$2.00 shipping and handling. 
Send your order to Gazette Disk, 
COMPUTE Publications, 324 
West Wendover Avenue, Suite 
200, Greensboro, North Carolina 
27408. 



REVIEWS 



OMNIBOOK 300 

It sounds too good to be 
true. A 20-MHz 386 note- 
book computer thiat runs Win- 
dows from a ROM card, 
weighs only 2.9 pounds, 
and gets nine Inours of bat- 
tery life with continuous use. 
It even includes a built-in 
mouse that pops out when 
needed and slides back for 
traveling. Could this really 
be the road warrior's dream 
machine? 

First, the bad news. The 
OmniBook's VGA screen 
isn't backlit, though it is one 
of the best reflective LCD 
screens around. In bright to 
moderately bright light, you 
shouldn't have any trouble 
reading it (except possibly 
with very small type, if you 
and your eyes are over 40). 
In dim light to near dark- 
ness, you'll either have to re- 
frain from computing alto- 
gether or seei< out the near- 
est light. 

If you're looking for a 
DOS machine, this isn't it. 
The OmniBook was opti- 
mized for Windows. Even 
when I stripped out some of 
the drivers, I could squeeze 
out only 470K for DOS pro- 
grams. In addition, the Om- 
niBook's ROM-based Win- 
dows can't run in 386 en- 
hanced mode, so you won't 
be able to multitask DOS pro- 
grams under Windows. 

Back to the good stuff. 
The OmniBook comes in 
two models: one with a 
40MB hard drive and one 
with a 10MB Flash-RAM 
card. Both storage devices 
are automatically com- 
pressed by the built-in Dou- 
bleSpace compression (es- 
sentially doubling the capac- 
ity of either card), and both 
are PCMCIA cards (making 
them easy to upgrade later 
on). The hard drive model 
gives you more storage 
(80MB versus 20MB) for 



less money ($1,950 versus 
$2,375), but the Flash-RAM 
model can run as long as 
nine hours on the Om- 
niBook's rechargeable bat- 
tery; it can also run from 
four ordinary alkaline AA bat- 
teries. The hard disk model 
can run as long as five 
hours on the rechargeable 



tional Type II PCMCIA slot, 
if you buy the Flash-RAM 
model, you'll have two addi- 
tional Type II PCMCIA slots. 
Besides being able to use 
most Type II cards, you can 
also use many Type I 
cards. 

I was able to move data 
between the OmniBook and 



■HiBiiii;piiiiil 




Hewlett-Packard's OmniBook 300 packs up to ten hours of battery 
power and Windows in ROM in a 2.9 pound package. 



battery; it can also use four 
lithium AA batteries, 

Despite the OmniBook's 
light weight and compact 
proportions (11.1 x 6.4 x 
1.4 inches), its keyboard is 
full-size — except for the 
Home, End, PgUp, PgDn, 
Tab. and cursor keys. The 
screen is a generous nine 
inches wide, with contrast 
buttons mounted nearby, 
The unit ships with 2MB of 
RAM (which isn't as bad as 
it sounds, since Windows 
3.1, Microsoft Word for Win- 
dows 2.0c, Microsoft Excel 
4.0a, and LapLink come on 
a ROM card and use only 
small amounts of system 
memory when they run). A 
separate slot lets you add an- 
other 2MB or 6MB of system 
RAM, 

If you buy the hard disk 
model, you'll have an addi- 



an HP 95LX palmtop using 
an Epson 2MB RAM card. 
And you don't have to give 
up a PCMCIA slot for com- 
munications — HP offers an 
optional internal fax/data mo- 
dem that fits into yet anoth- 
er slot. 

The OmniBook 300 is noth- 
ing short of a technical mar- 
vel, with its light weight, com- 
pact size, all-PCMCIA stor- 
age, and small hideaway 
mouse. If you can live with 
the nonbacklit screen (and 
many can't), the OmniBook 
is the state of the art for high- 
tech traveling. 

DAVID ENGLISH 

Hewlett-Packard 
(800) 443-1254 

OmniBook 300 witti 40MB hard 
drive— SI ,950 

OmniBook 300 with 10MB Flash- 
RAM drive— $2,375 
Circle Reader Service Number 434 



PAGEMAKER 5.0 

At the high end of the desk- 
top-publishing market, 
Aldus and Quark play a per- 
petual game of one-upman- 
ship. Quark extended the bat- 
tle beyond the Macintosh 
platform with its recent Win- 
dows version of XPress, but 
the new PageMaker 5.0 for 
Windows and the Macintosh 
promises to secure Aidus's 
place as king of the desktop 
publishing hill. 

Of course, PageMaker 
5.0 sports all the features 
that made the previous re- 
leases of the program suc- 
cessful, such as easy inter- 
change of documents be- 
tween the PC and Mac, the 
pasteboard interface (which 
allows you to drop docu- 
ment elements off the side 
of a page for safekeeping 
while you shuffle them 
around), the speedy Story 
Editor for altering or adding 
text, the handy Table Editor 
program, and professional 
output to personal printers 
and typesetters alike. 

Version 5.0 adds a raft of 
new features that overcome 
previous iimitations and di- 
rectly compete with those in 
archrival XPress. One of the 
most useful and long-await- 
ed improvements is the abil- 
ity to open multiple docu- 
nnents (limited only by avail- 
able memory) and drag and 
drop elements from one to 
another, Text and graphics 
rotation and skewing are oth- 
er major enhancements, al- 
lowing for much more flexi- 
ble and creative layouts. 
You can rotate text and 
graphics in 0.01 -degree in- 
crements and directly edit ro- 
tated text. And you no long- 
er have to purchase an add- 
on program to do process- 
color separations — that's 
now a standard feature. 

Most of the bugs In earli- 
er versions have been elimi- 

OCTOBER 1993 COMPUTE 97 







The Official Guide 
to 

ROGER WILCO 

SPACE 
ADVENTURES 

Second Edition 



The complete guide to Space Quests l-V. Includes 
maps, screen shots, and solutions to all five Space 
Quest adventures. 

To order your copy send S16.95 plus $2.50 for shipping and handling (U.S., $4 to Canada and $6 
other) to COMPUTE Books, do CCC, 2500 McCiellan Ave., Pennsauken. NJ 08109. (Residents 
of NC, NJ, and NY please add appropriate tax; Canadian orders add 7% Goods and Services Tax.) 
VISA and Mastercard accepted: be sure lo include your account number, expiration date, and signa- 
ture. All orders must be paid in U.S. funds drawn on a U.S. bank. Orders will be shipped via UPS 
Ground Service. Offer good while supplies last. 




PLEASE RUSH ME THE PENTHOUSE INTERACTIVE CD-ROM: 

_ = $ Total Orders = S 



S1 29.95 + S4.50 (shipping & handling) x 
Name 



_ Address- 



City. 



-State. 



I 



Check Money Order Visa MasterCard ct«ticarTjh 
Card Acc't.* Exp. dale 



-Zip. 



-800-999-23 1 4 



-Signature. 



Paymeni muir accompany order. Al o,^ J-G wmtki (o.' Otrli^eiy, 
J.S, MAILCRDEH: PENTHOUSE VIDEO. JNC , PO Bo. 31D 1 73. N^v,rng[Ort. COrifl. 05131 



REVIEWS 



nated. Gone is thie annoying glitch in 
PageMaker 4.0 for Windows (hat 
would truncate your font list if it extend- 
ed to the bottom of the screen. The 
Font menu now uses submenus to dis- 
play your entire list. PageMaker also 
used to hate 32,768-color video 




PageMaker 5.0 adds multiple documents, 
rotation, and a control palette. 

modes, but no longer; we were able to 
use it with a 32,768-color driver on a 
Dell 466/M with no problems. 

Manipulating text and graphic ele- 
ments on the page is much easier and 
faster with PageMaker's new floating 
control palette. This narrow little panel 
is tool-sensitive, so whenever you 
change tools, the most often-used func- 
tions are only a mouse click away. 
When you select the text tool, the con- 
trol palette lets you switch between par- 
agraph and character modes to give 
you complete text control without your 
having to access the Type menu. Inter- 
ruptible screen redraws also boost pro- 
ductivity; you no longer have to wait for 
the entire screen to redraw before you 
take another action. 

Version 5.0 is shipped with more 
than 20 Aldus Additions: macros and 
independent software components 
used for making drop caps, bulleting 
or numbering lists, creating shortcut 
printer style sets, listing styles used in 
your document, balancing columns, 
and more. Many of these Additions 
were written with PageMaker's new 
script language. Third-party Additions 
are already available, and you can cre- 
ate your own using the script lan- 
guage. The script-language manual 
isn't included, but it's available free to 
registered users. 

Aldus provides more than 65 filters 
for importing data; PageMaker now sup- 
ports Photo CD and Ventura Publisher 
files, and you can import Windows Me- 
tafiles and PICT images directly into ei- 
ther the Windows or Macintosh plat- 
form. You have the option of convert- 
ing images from one format to the oth- 
er when you transfer documents 



98 



COriflPUTE OCTOBER 1993 



across platforms, or you can leave 
them unconverted if you plan to trans- 
fer ttie document back to its original 
platform. Unfortunately, the popular 
JPEG 24-bit format isn't supported, but 
we were able to import JPEG images us- 
ing Pagefvlaker's OLE support and a 
third-party program. 

PageMaker has new features and en- 
hancements for nearly every aspect of 
page layout. Three leading methods, ba- 
seline shift, and precise control of kern- 
ing from within the control palette great- 
ly simplify typesetting. You can now 
scan directly into a PageMaker docu- 
ment using a TWAIN-standard scan- 
ning device. Panose font mapping sim- 
plifies bringing documents from sys- 
tems with different typefaces, and six 
color libraries (including PANTONE) 
make color matching a snap; you can 
even create custom color libraries. 
There are many other improvements, 
including automatic true typographer's 
quotation marks, support for printing 
nonconsecutive groups of pages, and 
new printing code that no longer re- 
quires custom drivers. 

There's a lot more that's new than 
we have room to describe here. Suffice 
it to say that Aldus has taken a good 
program and made it great, and that 
current users will find PageMaker 5.0 
to be well worth the $150 upgrade 
price. Documentation is complete, and 
the program includes free technical sup- 
port for 90 days after the first call. 
Whether you're putting out a laser-print- 
ed company newsletter or a color-sep- 
arated national magazine, you'll find 
PageMaker 5.0 is up to the task. 

PHILLIP MORGAN and DENNY ATKIN 

Aldus 

(206) 625-2320 

$895 

Circle Reader Service Ngmber 435 

LEMMINGS 2: THE 
TRIBES 

When asked to give our two cents 
worth about Lemmings 2; The Tribes, 
our reaction has to be that two cents 
isn't nearly enough! This sequel is pack- 
ed with cute, engaging new features, 
more Lemming abilities, and oodles of 
new scenarios, if the original Lem- 
mings was a perfect arcade game, 
then this is perfection improved upon. 
Once again, the goal is to guide a 
bunch of suicidal Lemmings from one 
part of the screen to another. This 
time, though, your seemingly endless 
quest to save your Lemming friends 
from calamity involves 12 tribes of 60 
of the diminutive rodents. Each tnbe is 
native to a different part of Lemming Is- 



Most People Can't See a 

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Something Besides SlmClty* 

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Coming this Christmas, i 



MIA X I S 



Circle Reader Service Number 158 



NEW FROMonnrui bddks 



onnmi 



BEST SCIENCE 
ncnON THREE 




EDfTtD BV E.ULN DaTIOW 

Oii^nti KQfte by lint^ K. Le Gtin. Thome 

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WUion. Pk Ck1%vi. SoMt B«k»l. Un McOoo*kl, 

Bftue McAnttcr. And Smvxt Inss- 



INCLUDES TEN NEW,NEVER- 
BEFORE PUBUSHED STORIES 
AND ONE REPRINT FROM 
OMNI MAGAZINE 

WITH STORIES BY; 

BRUCE McAllister simon ings 

THOAMSM.DISCH 
URSU^K. LeGUIN GAHAN 
WILSON JOHN CROWLEY 
PATCADIGAN IAN McDONALD 
SCOTT BAKER PAT MURPHY 



Send me the Omni Best 
Science Fiction checked below: 

n Omni Best Science Ration 

Three (S10.00) S 

n Omni Best Science Fiction 

One (SS.95) S 

n Omni Best Science Fiction 

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Shipping and handling 

($2 U.S., S4 Canada S6 Other) S 

Sales tax. Residents of 

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sales tax. Canadian orders 

add 7% GST $ 



Name_ 



Address 


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Sianature 



Total. 



Mail to: Omni Books 
c/oCCC 

2500 McCIellan Avenue 
Pennsauken, NJ 08109 

All osiers must be paid in U.S. funds drawn on a 
U.S. l3ank. Offer good while supplies last. 



OCTOBER 1993 COMPUTE 99 



REVIEWS 



land, a strange land com- 
posed of polar ice, tropical 
beach, highlands, medieval 
adventure, Egyptian thrills, 
circus fun, caves, and even 
outer space! You guide 
each tribe through ten levels 
of obstacles, and each level 
starts with the number of 
Lemmings you've saved in 
the previous one. The re- 
ward for guiding all 60 Lem- 
mings through all ten levels 
is a piece of the sacred 
Gold Talisman, necessary to 
the ultimate salvation of the 
tribes — evacuating them to 
the safety of the Ark, 

If you played Lemmings 
and Oh No! fvlore Lem- 
mings, you'll be delighted 
as you encounter many new 
features and innovations 
with Lemmings 2. There are 
now 50 Lemming skills, in- 
cluding kayaking, riding mag- 
ic carpets, flying jet-packs, 
and pole-vaulting. We've 
spent many rewarding 
hours rescuing the original 
Lemmings, and we're reap- 
ing the same harvest of en- 
joyment and pleasure with 
Lemmings 2. 

As an extra bonus for 
those with sound cards, 
each of the 12 tribes has a 
different musical accompani- 
ment. Jazzy tunes will draw 
you even deeper into the 
mood of the game. 

Just one warning: Sneak 
Lemmings 2 into your home 
and try it out before anyone 
else has a chance! If not, 
be prepared to give up your 
PC, Even the most comput- 
er-averse folks in your fami- 
ly will become engrossed in 
this cute game. We applaud 
Psygnosis for doing it 
again— at least 12 times bet- 
ter than the first time! 

BRUCE and MARGARET BOWDEN 



Psygnosis 
(617) 497-7794 
$59.95 

Circle Reader Service Number 436 

100 COMPUTE OCTOBER 1993 



STACKER 3.1 

Who needs more hard disk 
space? Everyone does, as 
fvlicrosoft admitted when it in- 
cluded DoubleSpace with 
fvlS-DOS 6. If you're uncom- 
fortable using Dou- 
bleSpace, however, or if you 



and disk and file compres- 
sion statistics are available 
from Windows File Manager 
and the DOS Dir command, 
f^y favorite feature, howev- 
er, is one that's buried m the 
on-disk README file: When 
you exit Windows, Stacker 
3.1 flushes the SMARTDrive 




Lemmings 2: The Jr,bes ^ .. ^;,., , .\. ,. different skills to use to 
save the cute little rodents from extinction. 



want slightly faster and tight- 
er compression with a more 
flexible interface, try Stacker 
3,1. 

This newest version of 
Stacker comes in two ver- 
sions: a special version for 
DOS 6 and another version 
for all other DOSs. If you're 
not using DOS 6, however, 
you can probably skip the up- 
grade, because many of the 
program's best features re- 
quire the new DOS. I'll focus 
on the DOS 6 version. 

The biggest news with 
Stacker 3.1 is that the Stack- 
er device driver loads be- 
fore CONFIG.SYS and AU- 
TOEXEC.BAT run. so the 
days of mirrored system 
files are over. With 3.1, you 
have one set of system 
files, and they're on drive C, 
just where they should be. 

Other new features 
abound. Stacker 3.1 can con- 
vert DoubleSpace drives to 
Stacker drives, it sports an 
editable STACKER, INI file. 



cache. Safety first. That's 
Stac's motto, and I like it. 

CLIFTON KARMES 

Stac Electronics 

(619) 431-7474 

DOS 6 version— $79.95 

Stacker 30 upgrade— $19.95 

Circle Reader Service Number 437 



KIDCUTS 



Those brightly colored mini- 
ature pairs of scissors, the 
kind you used when you 
were a kid, can coexist nice- 
ly with mice and keyboards 
in the Computer Age. In its 
new creativity kit, KidCuts, 
Brederbund pairs them with 
software to give kids the 
tools they need to create pa- 
per dolls, masks, hats, 
cards, puzzles, puppets, 
and animal cutouts. 

KidCuts puts a party on 
the keyboard. Kids use 
many of the same tools that 
delight them in Broder- 
bund's blockbuster drawing 



program, KidPix, to color in 
ready-made forms of cat- 
face masks, princess paper 
dolls, monster puppets, and 
a host of imaginative charac- 
ters, cards, and party fa- 
vors. Just as in KidPix, 
they'll find the familiar Undo 
Guy, paint can, rubber 
stamps of funny creatures 
and facial expressions, 
wacky brushes and pencils 
that spatter and drip, crazy 
erasures, and odd little 
sound effects that accompa- 
ny every dot, line, splotch, 
or smudge they make on- 
screen. And there's a new 
tool, the magic wand, that 
does different things depend- 
ing on the project they're 
working on. The program 
comes with real plastic scis- 
sors to cut out creations. 

Children work from a 
main menu, or Project Pick- 
er, where they choose what 
they'll create. With every se- 
lection, submenus pop up 
and present them with differ- 
ent options. If they choose 
puppets, for instance, the 
submenu asks if they want 
to create a clown, baby, vam- 
pire, or robot. 

The printouts also pre- 
sent surprises. If they print a 
cat mask, for instance, the 
program prints a mask sur- 
rounded by drawings of 
claws and a mouse ring 
that the kids can wear as 
pari of the disguise. And 
there are clever little notes 
on the printouts, like "Try Kit- 
ty Cat press-on nails! Kitty 
claws to tape on your 
paws!" The manual offers 
tips on how to milk the most 
fun from the activities. 
KidCuts provides an excel- 
lent blend of computer- and 
paper-based creativity. 

CAROL ELLISON 



Broderbund 
(800) 521-6263 
Approximately $30 

Circle Reader Service Number 438 





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Imprisoned in a Nazi Fbifi%ss' 

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■ Hear professionally composed 
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Call Toll Free 1-800-GAME123 

For the cost of shipping and handling, only $4.00, you'll receive 
Episode One, Escape from Wolfeiistein. Or download Episode One 
and pay no shipping and handling. Call the Software Creations BBS 
and check out our FREE Apogee file section. BBS Phone Lines are: 
• (508) 365-2359:2400 BAUD 

- (508) 368-7036:2400-9600 , ,,. 

- (508) 368-4137:2400-14.4JC 

Episodes tivo through six are sold separate}]/ and can be purchased hj " P.O. Box 476389 " software 
catling Apogee's toll-free number, shown above. Garland, TX 75047 

circle Reader Service Number 300 

Not Recommended for Younger Viewers Due to Realistic Depictions of Violence 

Wollenstein 3-D requires an IBM or 100% compatible campuier with 640K RAM, a VGA graphics card, and a hard disk drive. Extended memory (XMS), expanded 

- memory (EMS), joystick, and mouse are optional. IBM is a registered trademark of International Busirress Machines, Inc. Sound Blaster is a registered trademark of 

Creative Labs, Inc. AdLib is a registered trademark of AdLib, Inc. 



SOFTWARE 



REVIEWS 



SCANPLUS COLOR 
6000 

Combining professional im- 
age capture and OCR in a 
small package is what the 
ScanPlus Color 6000 sheet- 
fed scanner is all about. The 
scanner is tiny. Its footprint 
is barely larger than a sheet 
of paper: a couple of inches 
wider and a couple of inch- 
es shorter. Yet it can gather 
enough information in a sin- 
gle pass to create a 24-blt 
color image at 600 dpi — plen- 
ty of resolution for profession- 
al work. 

The unit is quiet and 
quick, feeding a sheet of pa- 
per through for a 1GMB 24- 
bit scan in six minutes and 
scanning a typewritten 




Plusiek's ScanPlus Color 6000 gives your PC the capability to scan 
art in 600 dpi color tor an amazingly low price. 



page for OCR in 35 sec- 
onds, then interpreting the 
text (a software function 



that'll vary depending on the 
OCR package selected) in 
an additional 55 seconds. 



You can select your im- 
age-editing and OCR soft- 
ware from among some of 
the top contenders: Read- 
Right, Perceive/286, Omni- 
Page, TextPert, Wordscan, 
and Wordscan Plus, as well 
as PC Paintbrush IV Plus, 
WinRIX, and Micrografx Pic- 
lure Publisher. Picture Pub- 
lisher (a COMPUTE Choice 
winner) and Wordscan are 
the manufacturer's recom- 
mendations and the soft- 
ware tested here. 

This suite of applications 
and a high-resolution color 
scanner make a team that 
would be hard to beat. If 
you're looking for simple 
OCR, this machine's fea- 
tures and power would be 
overkill; you should consider 
the much less expensive, 



UNKS 386 PRO 

«"PC Game of the Year"^ 



— Game player Magazine 



"READER'S Choice Award*' 



— Multimedia World 



"Golden Triad Award" 



— Computer Game Review 



"Compute's Choice Award" 



-Compute 



"BEST Graphics Award" 

— Video Games and Computer Entertainment 

If you DON*r have Unks 386 Pro yet, you owe it to yourselj" to put this magazine oowivf 

RIGHT NOW AND GO OUT AND BUY IT AT YOUR LOCAL SOFTWARE RETAILER! 



300-clpi, black-and-white 
ScanPlus B/W 300 
PageReader LT scanner. 

On the other hand, the 
eOGO's price is amazingly 
low for 600-dpi color scan- 
ning. (In contrast, the 600- 
dpi Sharp flatbed JX 610 col- 
or scanner costs $13,500.) 
Being sheet fed reduces the 
scanner's versatility vis-a- 
vis a flatbed scanner, but 
for desktop publishing or 
photo editing, the system 
will fill the bill. 

A model of the ScanPlus 
Color 6000 with 1MB of 
RAM {to speed scanning) 
and an automatic sheet feed- 
er is available for $1,299. 
Plustek US also offers a 600- 
dpi gray-scale scanner with 
a sheet feeder for S899. 

ROBERT BIXBy 



Plusiek US 

(800) 685-8088 

(408)980-1234 

$899 

Circle Reader Service Number 439 

STRIKE 
COMMANDER 

When it was first shown at 
CES in 1991, Ongin's Strike 
Commander promised to 
set a new standard for detail 
and audiovisual experience 
in PC flight simulators. The 
long-delayed game didn't 
ship until late April of this 
year, and in the meantime, 
many other companies had 
almost caught up technolog- 
ically. However, the delay 
was good, because it gave 
the PC game-hardware 



base time to catch up as 

well — Strike Commander is 
a game that's most at home 
on a very fast 486 with a re- 
ally big hard drive. 

You're a flyer in Stern's 
Wildcats, a mercenary F-16 
squadron in a bleak, not-loo- 
distant future where the U.S. 
has splintered into a num- 
ber of republics and the IRS 
has hired its own guns to col- 
lect taxes from the breaka- 
way states, Early in the 
game, Commander Stern 
doesn't make it home from a 
mission, and you find your- 
self in command, charged 
with keeping the squadron fi- 
nancially solvent while up- 
holding Stern's ideals. Un- 
like most mere squads, 
Stern's Wildcats have a rep- 
utation for turning down mor- 



ally questionable missions. 

The game unfolds much 
like Wing Commander, with 
cinematic interludes alternat- 
ing with pulse-pounding ac- 
tion missions. During the cin- 
ematic sequences, you 
choose which missions to 
commit the Wildcats to, and 
who will be your wing man 
(or wing woman, as the 
case may be — some of the 
hottest pilots in this game 
are women, a welcome 
change in the typically 
testosteronecentric flight 
Sim arena). You'll also have 
to decide which weapons 
you can afford to buy while 
balancing the budget. 

At the end of each inter- 
lude, you're given an oppor- 
tunity to arm your plane (a 
full suite of modern air-to-air 



^ 




UD GOLD!! 



J* • 



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"SPA Award'! 

iH Best Sports i 
Program 1993 

- — SOFTWARE PUBLISHERS ASSOCIATION 

'The best golf game 

ON THE planet!" 

— PC Home Journal 

"#1 SELLING 
ENTERTAINMENT 

PRODUCT IN AMERICA." 

— PC Research (Oct,'92) 

IF YOU CAN'T FIND LINKS 386 PRO NEAR YOU, CALL 
1-800-800^4880 FOR QUESTIONS OR ORDERING . 







--:- SOFTWARE INCORPORATED 

4910 W. Amelia Earhart Dr., SLC, UT 84116 



Circle Reader Service Number 169 



REVIEWS 



and aiNo-ground weapons 
is available), and then it's off 
into the wild blue yonder. Up- 
on taking to the skies, you'll 
find that this isn't a complicat- 
ed Sim like Falcon 3.0, but 
neither is it an arcade game 
like Wing Commander. 
Strike Commander has 
found a near-perfect bal- 
ance between realism and 
playability which won't intim- 
idate the novice pilot but is 
accurate enough to satisfy 
the majority of PC pilots. 
Three levels of challenge 
await you in combat, and 
you'll face hot pilots in a 
wide variety of aircraft, rang- 
ing from the old l\/liG-21 
Foxbat to the newer F-15 Ea- 
gle to the stealthy F-23 
Black Widow, with a few sit- 
ting-duck 747 and AWACS 
aircraft thrown in for fun 
You'll also fly air-to-ground 
missions against both fixed 
and mobile targets. Toward 
the end of the game, you 
get to trade In your F-16 for 
an F-22 Lightning II, a hot Ut- 
ile plane. Early demo ver- 
sions shown at trade shows 
offered many planes — even 
a P-38 Lightning — but this 
feature was dropped 

Strike Commander's graph- 
ics are remarkable. The 
ground interludes have the 
quality of a graphic novel, 
and the air-to-air detail is strik- 
ing — you can actually see 
squadron markings and ejec- 
tion seat warnings on enemy 
planes. There's a price to 
pay for this detail, though; Al- 
though Origin says the game 
can be played on a 386, an- 
yone running on less than a 
486SX/25 is sure to be disap- 
pointed. I found graphic up- 
dates troublesomely slow in 
gun combat even on a 
486DX/33, although the 
game was quite playable. 
Owners of DX2 machines 
will love this game, and it's a 
great way to show off that 
new Pentium system. The 

104 COMPUTE OCTOBER 1993 




Origin's Strike Cornmander sets a new graphics standard for PC 
flight simulators, but it requires a lot of horsepower 




With a 40MB hard drive and 286-class performance, the tiny 
Handbook is great for taking DOS apps on tlie road. 



gaming experience is made 
even better by a great musi- 
cal score and digitized 
sound effects; an optional 
speech pack is a must-have 
if you can afford the hard 
drive space — SMB. in addi- 
tion to the 33MB the base 
game takes up. (Although it 
will run from a Stacker or Dou- 
bleSpace drive, the files are 
already compressed and 
won't shrink much, if at all.) 
You'll want a joystick to play 
this game, and while Strike 
Commander supports the 
Thrustf^asler WCS throttle, I 
couldn't get the FCS coolie 
hat to work, and the game 



won't work properly with rud- 
der pedals hooked up. 

If you're not a detail purist 
and you have the horsepow- 
er and disk space to acco- 
modate this game, you'll 
find hours of fast-action fun. 
Although it doesn't have the 
realism of Falcon, its audio- 
visual punch and playability 
keep me coming back to it 
more than any other sim. 

DENNY "CRASH" ATKIN 



Origin 

(512) 335-5200 

S79.95 

Speech Accessory Pacl< - J24.95 

Circle Reader Service Number 440 



GATEWAY 2000 
HANDBOOK 

Portable computers are cram- 
ming more of the functional- 
ity of their desktop counter- 
parts info their slim cases 
every day — you can now 
get a screaming-fast 
486DX2 color notebook with 
a huge hard drive if that's 
what you need. But if you're 
like me, you leave the desk- 
lop publishing and national- 
debt balancing back at the 
office and use your road ma- 
chine primarily for writing 
and communications. If hav- 
ing a little space left in your 
briefcase is more important 
than hypersonic perform- 
ance, Gateway 2000's little 
Handbook may be your tick- 
et to portable productivity. 

Measuring 9.8 x 5.9 x 
1 .4 inches and weighing on- 
ly 2.75 pounds with its bat- 
tery, the Handbook is small 
enough and light enough to 
take along just about any- 
where, but it's large enough 
to comfortably touch-type 
on, The 10-MHz Chips and 
Technologies 8680 "PC on 
a Chip" processor gives the 
Handbook 286-class perform- 
ance, and the backlit dou- 
ble-scan 640 X 400 CGA dis- 
play is fine for most MS- 
DOS applications. The 8680 
processor doesn't fully emu- 
late a 286 chip (it's actually 
an enhanced 80186 clone), 
so you can't run Windows 
3.1 on the Handbook. 

Shipped with 1MB of 
RAM, the Handbook is ex- 
pandable to 3MB, which 
can be configured as extend- 
ed Of expanded memory. I 
found the Handbook's 
40MB hard drive much easi- 
er to work with than the PC- 
MCIA RAM cards used for 
storage by many computers 
in this size class. There's no 
built-in floppy drive, but an 
external 1.44MB floppy 



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A// Tmdemarks are property of their respective owners 
Circle Reader Service Number 207 



T|5r i^^ 



drive that also sports a sec- 
ond serial port and a full- 
size parallel port is available 
as an option. The back of 
the Handbook has a 9-pin se- 
rial port and a custom mini 
parallel connector (an adapt- 
er is included that converts 
it to a full-size port). 

Battery life is good, at 2.5 
hours with power saving disa- 
bled and nearly 4 hours 
with it enabled. The battery 
is literally a snap to remove 
and replace, and a special 
pack is available that will let 
you use AA batteries in a 
pinch, When you turn the 
Handbook off, it actually 
goes into a suspend mode, 
so when you turn it back on 
you're right where left off. 

The almost full-size key- 
board is remarkably easy to 
type on for a computer this 
small, but some Handbook 
owners won't like the fact 
that the Home, End, Page 
Up, and Page Down func- 
tions require you to hit an Fn 
key and a cursor key. Al- 
though the screen is only 
CGA, it's very sharp; I had 



Lilc iJrivc BcEontlgurc Qptrani l)Hp 



t,tpp|;n!rmi.-mTB!Sitn 







The Norton Speedcache+ 4.0, which supports CD-ROM drives as 
welt as hard dist<s. includes a Windows control interface. 



no complaints when running 
DOS applications. 

Bundled with your choice 
of fvIS Works 2.0 or WordPer- 
fect for DOS, the Handbook 
is a superb value for those 
who need to do basic work 
and have a heavy-duty PC 
on the desk at home or at 
the office- And it's so light 
and small that I don't leave 
home without it. And if you 
do need to run Windows 



apps on the road, Gateway 
is about to ship the Hand- 
book486, a 486SX version 
with a VGA display, Win- 
dows 3.1, PCf^CIA Type II 
slot, and pointing stick that 
will start at $1495. 

DENNY ATKIN 



Gateway 2000 
(800) 846-2059 
$995 

Circle Reader Service Number 441 



THE NORTON 
SPEEDCACHE+ 4.0 

A disk cache program is 
one of the best and least- 
expensive ways to speed 
up your computer. It can 
breathe new life into a slow 
hard drive and make a fast 
one seem even faster. 
While a cache only speeds 
up access to data that's 
needed more than once, 
that speed increase can be 
as much as 4000 percent. 

The Microsoft SMART- 
Drive cache program 
comes with both DOS and 
Windows, so it's essentially 
free. SfvlARTDrive works 
fine, but The Norton Speed- 
cache+ runs faster (Norton 
claims two to three times fast- 
er) and adds support for 
both CD-ROM and remova- 
ble cartridge drives, On the 
down side, Speedcache+ re- 
quires more memory than 
SfvlARTDrive. While 

SMARTDrive uses about 
28K of memory, Speed- 
cache+ uses about 68K 

IXITOBER 1993 COIvSPUTE 105 



CATALOG 
GROUP 



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The most sensual catalogs ever 
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24 hrs a day, 7 days a week. 



Sen d to: D PI, P.O. Box 77902, Dept, 4CPTI00193, 
I^M San Francisco, CA <?4 1 07-0902 j^=, 

PLEASE PRINT CLEARLY 

Name ..._ 



Address . 
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State Zip 

Phonel ) .:____ 

I Please rush me my first copy of Voyages 
Catalog Group, I have enclosed $10 

Coih Ocheck QMon./ Order Qcied.! Cord Q 



JL 



AtfrhoriHd 5^}A«tfcrt . r frm 9>ar i I jvori h:/ ognf 



REVIEWS 



when its CD-ROM caching is turned on 
(you should be able to load some or all 
of a cache program into upper memo- 
ry using QEMfvl-386 or a third-party 
memory manager). 

Because CD-ROfyi drives access 
their data about 25 times slower than 
hard drives, Speedcache-h can make a 
big difference with CD-ROM programs, 
It significantly smooths operation of Mi- 
crosoft Encarta, a CD-ROM-based en- 
cyclopedia with lots of high-resolution 
graphics and CD-quality sounds. With 
SMARTDrive, Encarta can bog down 
when you move from one section of 
the program to another. With Speed- 
cache-t-, Encarta runs dramatically fast- 
er, especially on a relatively slow CD- 
ROM drive, 

Like any good cache program, 
Speedcache+ offers a variety of op- 
tions, including the ability to turn off 
write caching and to specify which 
drives will be cached. It automatically 
recognizes compression programs 
such as Stacker and DoubleSpace, 

If you don't own a CD-ROM drive, 
you can take advantage of Speed- 
cache-i- as a faster alternative to 
SMARTDrive. If you do own a CD-ROM 
drive, your CD-ROMs will perform no- 
ticeably better. For owners of Level 1 
MPC and sub-MPC CD-ROM drives, 
Speedcache+ may be the least expen- 
sive way to keep up with today's more 
demanding CD-ROM programs. 

DAVID ENGLISH 

Symaniec 
(800) 441-7234 

$99 ($19 for registered users of The Norton Utili- 
ties and The Norton Desklop for DOS) 
circle Reader Service Number 442 



MILLIE'S MATH HOUSE 

Edmark's preschool introduction to num- 
bers and geometry, Millie's Math 
House, is one of those rare and delight- 
ful programs parents can use with very 
young children. Rated for ages 2 to 6, 
it comes with nursery theme music, talk- 
ing animals, and screen images as an- 
imated and colorful as a cartoon. 

The program is designed for use 
both at home and in a preschool envi- 
ronment. Parents and teachers partici- 
pate in the learning, supplementing the 
concepts taught onscreen with fun- 
filled activities outlined in the manual. 
The program features an adult mode, 
accessed via a three-key combination, 
that not only offers tips on home and 
school play but also outlines how the 
games are played, what each game's 
learning goals are, and how much you 



should expect children of various ages 
to accomplish. 

The program features six games. 
Each is accessed from a screen 
which features Millie, a cartoon horse, 
sitting in her "main room," On the wall 
of the room is a shelf with toys. Click 
on a toy to access a game: Build-a- 
Bug, Number Machine, and Cookie 
Factory teach numbers and counting; 




Miilie's Math House uses cartoon graphics 
to introduce numbers and geometry. 

Mouse House, Bing & Boing, and Lit- 
tle, Middle, & Big teach shapes, sizes, 
patterns, and relationships. 

Each game has two modes. The Ex- 
plore and Discover mode allows chil- 
dren to browse the game, clicking on 
objects and numbers. As they click on 
objects, the game will read the names 
of game elements or play sound ef- 
fects associated with those objects. 

The Question and Answer mode pre- 
sents children with a challenge. For in- 
stance, in Bing & Boing's Explore and 
Discover mode, children click on pic- 
tures of animals (a dog, duck, and pig) 
to hear an animal sound and on 
shapes (a triangle, circle, and square} 
to hear a noise. In Question and An- 
swer mode, the game arranges the pic- 
tures in sets of two or three and plays 
the associated sounds. Then it challeng- 
es children to arrange objects to 
match the pattern and sounds it has 
presented. If your sound card has a re- 
cording feature, you can record your 
own sounds and use those in place of 
the ones in the game. 

An outstanding manual offers game 
information, along with tips for extend- 
ing the play into household or class- 
room situations by reinforcing the con- 
cepts in the game. That's just one of 
the beauties of the program. Learning 
isn't something that should stop at a 
keyboard or in a classroom. Millie's 
Math House treats math as an activity 
kids will take through life. 

CAROL ELLISOt^ 



Edmatk 
(80D) 556-8484 
(206) 861-8200 
S49.95 

Circle Reader Service Number 443 



BiSS&] Software 



(800) 638-5757 



Orders Only 



International Orders: (317) 878-5342 FAX Orders: (317) 878-4751 



C h e s t n u t " *1 5 

Bibles & HeHglon - New S Old Testaments. Study guides, covers Judaism. Chrisrianiry, Islam 
CUpart Goliath - Thousands of images (or all uses, In PCX & TIFF tormat! For DTP programs 
Colossal CooltbDOk ■ More recipes than "Joy of Coaking". Plus njlirlian guides, more'' 
Complcia Bookshop - An eniire bookshop. Inciudes: classics, poelry, humor, hislory. more' 
Deaihslar Arcade Battles Excihng VGA spaca wars, s hoot- err; ups. sports, & more 
Dictionaries & Language • Diclionanes. ihesaurjs. word proc. slyte spell checkers, foreign languages 
HAM Radio v3.a Packe! radio. saiePiEe. Iteq lists, service, mods. SSTV, FCC rags, exams, more! 
Our SoEar System - Encning NASA phoiOS d planetarium programs, siar'planei tocalors 
Shareware Overload! - 6Q0WB. all kinds of sppficaljors, ZiPPEDf Lots □! Windows prcgs, & gan^es 
Sound Sensations! - Sound Effects, vqiceSh music, utils, for AdLib & SounBlaster. S olher cards 
TechnoTools - C'C-+, Basjc, dBase, networkir^g, Unix. OSi2. Windows, assembly. Pascal, more! 
Too Many Typolonts - Counlloss typefonls in ATM. TrueType, GhQstSCripl. HP LasQr. and more. 
WIndowaro - Utiliiies, wallpaper, ertucaiion, icons, lont inslallars, games, and more lor Windows. 

AfEW/ Chesnul CD-ROM Titles 
Encyclopedia of Sound ■ Over 250 sound liies by the Music Factory in WAV format 
World Traveler - Photos by Mdiael NMBrath & Paul Elmendorf in PCX & GIF lormat 




Ne0d more descriptions? Call for our latest catalog. 



CD-ROM Hardware 



CD-ROM Drives 

Backpack CD (Transporteble) 389.00 

Mitsumi COROUHHImornal 199 00 

TeMi DM3024 (dnve onlyl 399.00 

Toshiba XM.3401 B (drive onlyl 479.00 

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VGA. 1MB. 540«480l!6.7. 




10Z4«76a«256, 12a0«1024i(16, 


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CD ROM 

Multimedia 

Itrlagazine 
Information 
on latest 
CD-ROM 
releases 
'3.00 



SonyCDU-581 
Teac CD-50 
Texel DM3024 



• MediaVision PAS16SCSI 

■ MediaVision PAS16SCSI 

■ MediaVision PAS16SCSI 



Speakers + 1 Software Bundle 

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CD-Format : Audio-Combined, fulode 1 & 2 Data Discs, CD-Audio Discs. CD-ROM XA (pictures). 
Audio compatibility: MPC and MS Windows with MultiMedia, AdLib, Soutvd Blaster. & Real Sound. 

^^ Software for Bundles Above (choose one) 

KB MPC Software Toolworks Encyclopedia (Grolier's), MPC US Atlas, MPC World Atlas. 

W MPC The Animals!, MPC Guiness Book Of World Records (1993) 

ee 

#% MPC Software Toolworks Encyclopedia (Grolier's), MPC US Atlas, MPC World Atlas, 
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0MPC Software Toolworks Encyclopedia (Grolier's), MPC US Atlas, MPC World Atlas, 
MPC Mavis Beacon Teaches Typing, MPC ChessMaster 3000 
oa 

©The Secrets of Monl^ey Island (5 Languages), Sporl's Best(3 games, 4 languages), 
MPC Wizard, CICA Windows Programs & Utilities, Jets and PropK, World View 
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Microsoft Works 


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My Advr^cd Label Designer 


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19 00 MIDI Music Shop 


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ProPhonss 1993 


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1Q4-0Q Leader Board Collection 


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Pto Pfione Business 1993 


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QSA 


59,0'0 Carmen San Diego 


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49.00 Win CD 


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30.00 


Secrets EKecutive Success 


30.00 Compton's Family Choice 


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Monster Media '93 


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26.00 


Clipari i Graahlcs 


Dinosaurs 


79.00 Mantis 


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Action 


29^00 Education. Mazier 


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1 S.OO C Source Users Lib 


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33.00 


Animation Magic 


57.00 ElecmcJty i Magnetism 


45.00 Penlomino 


25,00 IBM Libra/y lor AIX 


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29-QO Girls of Vnnd VI 


49.00 


Apollo {Space Senes:) 


39.00 European Monarchs 


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45.00 IBM NBl»iork Sottcopy Coll 


9.00 Phoenix 3 


1 9.00 Girls of Vivid V2 


49.00 


Audubon Birds 


29.00 Kid's Can Read: 


Pull Putt Joins tne Parade 


49,00 LAN Master 


29.00 Phoenix Phun ft Games 


25.00 Hidden Obsessions 


45.00 


Audubon Mammals 


29.00 Aesop's Fables 


Ringworld 


55,00 MS-DOS Collection 


15.00 QRZ Ham Radio 


19.00 HolPix2 


33-00 


CD Cad 3.7 


35.00 Cinderella 


Sci.Pi Fanlasv 


30.00 Power Tools tot DOS 


15.00 Shareware "93 


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33.00 


Clipari Galore 


29.00 Heather Hits Her 1st Home Pun Secret ■. Luttwatte 


25.00 Power Tools tor Windows 


15.00 Shwre Extravaganza (4 disks) 45.00 Hot PIx 4 


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25-OQ Programmers ROM 


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Clipari Heaven 


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C ipmaster Pro 


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Sherlock Cons 1 


J6-O0 Source C CD 


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39.00 


Color Magic 


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Corel Art Show HI 


59.0C Scary Poems For Rotten Kids Sherlock Cons 3 


59.00 fieifremx 


Shareware Studio 2 


20.00 Lovely Ladies II 


33.00 


Deep Voyage 


35.00 Tale Of Benjamin Bui^n^y Space Quest IV 


25.00 Alrcratl Encyclopedia 


39.00 Software Vault 2 


15-00 Moving Fantasies 


29.00 


Desktop Pub Dream Disk 


3900 Tale Of Peter Rabiit 


Triple Trrs Challenge 


45.00 Bible Library 


35.00 Super CD 


19.00 My Private Collec 1 


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Fantszia Fonts & Sounds 


29.00 Thomas' Snowsuit 


Whacky Funster 


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33.00 


Font Funhouse 


30.00 Your Choice 29.00 each Willy Beamish 


25.00 Cinemania 


69.00 Top 2000* Shwre 


25.00 Nightwatch 


49.00 


Fractunes 


29.00 Learn Speak Spanish 


59.00 Wing Ct/OB 2.Sec Missions 


55-00 Compton Upgrade S Switch 


98.00 Ultimate Games Colleaion 


15,00 PCPIxt 


33.DD 


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15,00 Learning At Home 


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Consumer Inlormation 


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30.00 Let's Play 


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Hot News Animations 


29.00 Mastering Math 


69 00 Complete Bookshop 


15-00 Enoyc Win 1 0, S-T. 


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49 00 Macmillsn Dctnary lorGhildren45.00 Classic Coliectian 


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25,00 Windows 1993 


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69.00 Desktop Booksrieif 


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46-00 Winware >I3 


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33-DC 


Key Fonts pro 


30,00 Multimedia Computer Tutor 


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39-00 Guiness 1992 


19.00 Wiipack 


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30.0C 


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25.00 Nat Geog Mammals 


29-00 Interactive Storylime VI 


05,00 Guines 1993 


59.00 Travel 


Rimfire Pacific 


40.00 


Made in the USA 


29.00 Playing w' Language English 


49.00 Interactive Slorylime V2 


35-00 Health & Medical Directory 


1 19.00 Global Explorer 


89.00 Seedy Movies 


33.00 


Mega Clip CD 
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29 00 Playing w/ Lang'uage French 


49.00 Inleracllve Storylime V3 


35.00 Hlstor/ ot Ihe World 


69,00 Great Cities VI 


35.00 Seventh Heaven 


33,00 


1 5,00 Playing Language Japanese d9.00 JusI Grandma & Me 


36,00 Holy Bible ft Christian Shware 19,00 Great Wonders WorkJ VI 


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Mother of All Ctip Art 


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35 00 Home Remedies 


35.00 Hong Kong At Its Besi 


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Publishers Pa:adise 


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PubJisri it 2,0 [DOS) 




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25,00 King James Bible 


35.00 National Parks 


33.00 Storm 1 


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Publish It 3.0 [Win) 


59.00 Arthur's Teacher Trouble 


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40.00 New York at its Besl 


25 00 Storm II 


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55.00 PC QloSK 


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Reel Clips 


39.00 Chess Maniac Nal Lampoon 


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Order wntn Check, Money Order. VISA. t^/laslerCarO, American E»press. er COD. Order Dy phone mail, or la* Note ihers is qa surcharge tor credit card orders. For the contiguous U S . CD-ROM sottwafe shipping is S5.00 perQutet (not trtte); 
0' S9,50 It COD Alaska. Hawaii, Puerto Hico, Mesico and Canada add SS-OO per CD- ROM software QEdei tor shipping Costs for stripping han^are. D^ orders to foreign countnes not rnertioned, are quoted at time o( (Kder. tndiarxa restdants 
ease add 5" sales Lax, Not responsitile lor typographical errors Please research your product purchases as all sales are Final. Afi products are covered by manulaaurer s warranty. Pnces ar-ti availability are subject lo ct^anfje wlhout notice. 



Free Spirit Software, Inc. Free Spirit Software, Inc. - PO Box 158 - 109 W Pearl Street - Trafalgar, IN 461 81 Questions? Phone (317) 878-5348 



Circle Reader Service Number 115 




UVEi Specializing in 
questions of love 

1-900 



$5 first min./$3 ea. addl. min. 



Use the wisdom of 

psychic forces to 

guide you In money, 

career and happiness 

1-900 

773-OMEN 

1 -900-773-6636 

S5 first min./S3 ea. addl. min. 

TAU( TO A UVE PSYCHIC! 



For entertainment purposes 
only. If you are under 18 years 

of age, please get parental 

permission. Live psychics are 

available 24 hours a day. 

Sponsored by Pet Inc., P.O. Box 

166, Hollywood, CA 90078. 



REVIEWS 

THREE SCREEN SAVERS 

Faithful use of a screen saver is a 
good practice if you're interested in 
prolonging the life of your monitor 
screen, but the patterns most screen 
savers present tend to be rather mun- 
dane, with floating hearts, fish, or sim- 
ple line patterns. These three pro- 
grams offer quite a refreshing change. 

Razzle Dazzle runs under either 
DOS or Windows, occupying a modest 
234K of disk space and 12K of RAM 
as a TSR. After a period of keyboard in- 
activity, with a length you can specify, 
the program activates itself with a seem- 
ingly endless variety of striking pat- 
;erns. Many are kaleidoscopic, but 
with effects no kaleidoscope ever imag- 
ined. Some simulate fireworks, with 
showers of stars. As the patterns 
change, the screen sometimes fades, 
scrolls, wraps up, or seems to melt 
from the top down. 

The results are simply beautiful. 
Everyone who's seen the program has 
spent many minutes in rapt enjoyment 
of the effects, I can't recommend the 
program too highly; I was so smitten my- 
self that 1 made a videotape of the 
screen and dubbed in some appropri- 
ate music for use as a background re- 
laxation program on TV. 

In quite a different mode and mood, 
Johnny Castaway runs only under Win- 
dows and requires 1800K of disk 
space. The program brings up an ani- 
mated cartoon about a castav/ay on a 
small island (as you might gather from 
the title) and is complete with sound ef- 
fects. The graphics and animation are 
quite well done. The program consists 
of a series of episodes rather than a 
continuous story line, so if you drop out 
and return, you don't miss a thing. The 
cartoon's mildly amusing for a while — 
children might enjoy it — but it gets pret- 
ty boring rather quickly, despite John- 
ny's adventures with sharks and mer- 
maids and Lilliputian pirates. Moreover, 
you wonder a bit about the screen- 
saving feature, since much of the 
screen remains totally unchanged for 
long periods of time. 

The most complex of the three 
screen savers. Origin FX, runs only un- 
der Windows and requires more than 
5MB of disk space. In return for this, 
you get a menu of patterns. There are 
26 "movies" from which to choose. 
Some of these are abstract patterns of 
lines or spheres, striking in their var- 
ying effects. Others have conventional 
moving objects, such as aircraft, space- 
ships, and asteroids. Others show car- 
toons, and still others display scenes 



from Origin's other programs, such as 
Ultima and Wing Commander. Many of 
the movies have sound effects, and all 
are very well done in their graphics 
and animation. 

If you're tired of movies, you can se- 
lect a slide show, which displays a se- 
quence of static images taken from 
any bitmapped files you happen to 
have around. The program includes 




Sierra 's Johnny Castaway blanks your 
screen and tells a story as well. 

several such files, Windows has many, 
and you may add to these by captur- 
ing scenes from the program's movies 
or by including bitmapped files from oth- 
er sources. If you want variety in your 
screen saver presentation, Origin FX 
does an excellent job. 

CHARLES IDOL 



Road Scholar 

(800) 443-7623 

Razzle Dazzle— $49,95 

Circle Reader Service Number 444 


Sierra On-Line 

(800) 326-6654 

Johnny Castaway— $34,95 

Circle Reader Service Number 445 



Origin 

(800) 245-4525 

Origin FX— $39.95 

Circle Reader Service Number 446 



SPECTRE 



If you like your gaming fast and hot, 
Spectre from Velocity Developmenl 
may be just the action you're looking 
for. In this three-dimensional, first-per- 
son-view blastathon, you must pilot 
your battle vehicle through a "virtual- 
reality" landscape, destroying enemies 
as well as gathenng ammo dumps and 
flags, While the ammo dumps give 
your vehicle a boost by repairing dam- 
age and restoring ammunition, the 
flags are most important, since you 
must grab them all before you can 
move on to the next level. 

When you begin a game, you can 
choose among four different vehicles. 
Then it's off to the battle. As you fight 
your way toward the flags, you can 
blast a single enemy vehicle with your 



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Penthouse, Forum, and 
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the best of Penthouse photos — 
the Pets, and more — many of 
which have never been 
published! Chat with 
Penthouse Pets . . . and all at 
low connect charges. 

Over the past several weeks, 
we've featured exclusive 
photos and online sessions 
with 1993 Pet of the Year Julie 
Strain, along with Pets Stevie 
Jean, Sam Phillips, Leslie 
Glass, and Amy Lynn, where 
each of these lovely women 
has revealed herself more 
completely than ever. 

Plus, our advanced online 
service lets you preview all 
photos in a matter of seconds. 
No more lengthy and 
expensive downloads before 
you see what you're getting. 

PENTHOUSE ONLINE operates 
at 9600 bps so we don't waste 
your time — or money: There's 
no 9600 surcharge! Only $5.95 
a month and 20 cents a minute 
for most areas. 

Plus, we've arranged with 
U.S. Robotics to offer you a 
deluxe, 9600-bps fax/data 
modem, with custom 
Penthouse Key insignia, for 
less than $170. 

[2400/9600 support; VGA/SVGA 
(recommended); 386/486 
(recommended), 1 MB Video RAM 
recommended. MS-DOS only,] 

DON'T WAIT! SEND FOR YOUR 
MEMBERSHIP KIT TODAY. 

Call 1-800-289-7368 

or circle reader service 
number 103. 



regular cannon or take on a pack by 
launching a fire grenade. Slnould you 
find yourself overwiielmed.by tfie com- 
petition, a quick tap of your tiackspace 
key whips you into hyperspace, from 
which you'll emerge at a different, fiope- 
fully safer, location. 

While the one-player game is chal- 
lenging, Spectre was really designed 
for network play with human players at 




Fast. 3-D action and multiplayer support 
will keep you coming back to Spectre. 

different computers. In this mode, you 
can choose from three scenarios. In Are- 
na, players gather points by destroying 
each other's vehicles; in Flag Rally, play- 
ers must collect the required number 
of flags; and in Base Raid, two teams 
struggle to take over the opponent's 
base. 

With its impressive 3-D graphics and 
awesome sound effects. Spectre is a 
simple but engrossing game when 
played against the computer. When 
you get a gang together — connected 
via either modem or formal network — 
you can kiss the evening goodbye. 

CLAYTON WALNUM 

Velocity Development 

(415) 775-8000 

$59,95 

$79 95 {for Iwo-user LAN pack) 

Circle Reader Service Number 447 



JOBHUNT 



Looking for a job in today's market can 
be rough. But Jobhunt from Scope 
International might just make your life 
easier. It offers the contacts and the 
tools needed to conduct targeted na- 
tional or regional mailings for a wide 
range of job titles. 

The newest version of Jobhunt, 4,0, 
features three lists: Scope's own target- 
ed profiles of 600-plus companies na- 
tionwide; a 3000- to 5000-record list of 
companies by Standard Industrial 
Code (S.I.C.) job classification; and 
your own compilation of contacts you 
assemble from such sources as classi- 
fieds, personal contacts, and Chamber 
of Commerce and school lists. Lists 
are expanded and updated regularly. 
One free update is included in the pur- 
chase price. 

In Scope's list, you can narrow your 
search by region or job category or 
both. In the S.LG. list, you can compile 
contacts by code number or state. For 



SPEM Wl 

We at COMPUTE 

strive to pmvJde you witii the latest 

and most useful home, business 

anti entertainment computer news 

and information. Now we're 

opening tlie COMPUTE EDITOR 

LINE-a direct linl< to our editorial 

staff that lets yotj truly participate 

in the shaping of COMPUTE 

Magazine. 

Using this program, you can 

comment on articles and features in 

COMPUTE. After hearing the 

introduction, you'll be asked to 

leave a message for the editor. Your 

message will be reviewed and may 

be published in a future issue. 



Here's how it works: 

1. Call the COMPUTE EDITOR 
LINE: 1 -900-884-8681 The 

charge is only SO. 95 per min. 

2. Select the month of the issue 
you want to talk about. 

3. Enter the extension number 
printed at ttie end of the article 
you want to discuss. If you 
don't have the extension 
number, just listen to ttte menu 
selections, and they will lead you 
to the proper extension for each 
item, 

4. Listen to the comment or 
information corresponding to the 
article you selected. 

5. Then, at the tone, leave your 
desired message! 

6. If you would like to make 
another selection, press " ■jlr " to 
return to the main menu. 

PET INC, 80x166, Hllywd., CA 
90078. Must be 18 or older. 
Touch Tone phones only. 



OCTOBER 1993 COMPUTE 109 



REVIEWS 



your own personal list, you 
can add as many contacts 
as you have disk space for. 

Once you've narrowed 
your prospects, you can use 
Jobhunt's word processor to 
write a cover letter and then 
merge the contacts onto the 
letters and envelopes or mail- 
ing labels. Add your re- 
sume, and you're set. You 
can use your own word proc- 
essor for cover letters and 
mail merge by exporting 
Jobhunt's contacts via a stan- 
dard ASCII file. 

Printing a list of your pros- 
pects gives a convenient 
trail of your job search's stat- 
us and what leads need to 
be followed up on or 
crossed off. On the printout, 
each company's profile is fol- 
lowed by three blank lines 
for comments. There are al- 
so three small boxes, each 
with a letter inside; N, E, 
and /. These letters stand 
for No opening, Evaluating, 
and Interview. When a lead 
doesn't pan out, you can eas- 
ily lock that company out, 
and it won't print. You can 
make follow-up calls from 
within the program using 
Jobhunt's autodialer and a 
Hayes-compatible modem. 

Jobhunt has a 25-page in- 
struction booklet and a 10- 
page tutorial you print out 
that steps you through an ex- 
ample of how to use the pro- 
gram. For the most part, the 
onscreen menus and instruc- 
tions make Jobhunt intuitive- 
Coupling that intuitiveness 
with its minimal hardware re- 
quirements, Jobhunt should 
be useful to almost anyone 
looking for a new source of 
income, In today's competi- 
tive environment, this may 
be the boost you need. 

BETH C FISHKIND 

Scope Inlernalional 
(704) 535-0614 
$49.95 

Cirele Reader Service Number 448 

110 COMPUTE OCTOBER 1993 



L.A. LAW 



Capstone's L.A. Law, The 
Computer Game, will have 
you collecting evidence and 
attending court as if you 
were the lawyer whose pho- 
torealistic image appears on 
your computer screen. 

After choosing the charac- 
ter you want to play, you 
must decide the best way to 
collect evidence to uphold 
your case in court. Evidence 
can be collected from many 
sources, including associate 
lawyers, clients, witnesses, 
opposing counsel, detec- 
tives, and your own re- 
search. Not only can you 
get information by going to 
visit people, but you can al- 
so use the telephone in 
your office at fvlcKenzie 
Brackman to confer with oth- 
ers who could be of help to 
your case. These people 
are listed in the phone direc- 
tory that comes with the 
game. 

The directions are very 
simple to follow. You're giv- 
en choices as to where to 
go and what questions to 
ask. Your only task is mak- 
ing the decision that'll give 
you the most information 
and use up the least 
amount of time. No, you 
don't have unlimited time to 
uncover all the mysteries of 
your case. The clock is count- 
ing down the time allotted un- 
til the trial takes place. 

You can elect to go to tri- 
al whenever you feel that 
enough preparation has 
been done to warrant a win- 
ning verdict. Once there, 
you must decide which open- 
ing statement to use and 
which witnesses to cross-ex- 
amine. Objections are al- 
lowed, along with requests 
for a recess, a continuance, 
a directed verdict, or a mis- 
trial. 

Throughout the game, 
there's a case file you can re- 



fer to for helpful information. 
Each time you learn some- 
thing useful or receive help- 
ful advice, it'll be added to 
the notes in your case file. 

You're given a score at 
the end of each trial accord- 
ing to what Douglas Brack- 
man thinks of your perform- 
ance. If you win all of the 
eight cases, you're made 
senior partner of McKenzie 
Brackman. 

Should you have a diffi- 
cult time solving your cases, 
there's an easy way out — a 
text file is provided that 
gives a step-by-step, fool- 
proof way of winning each 
case. This will give you the 
results you're seeking with- 
out the challenge. You de- 
cide whether you're clever 
enough to act as the attor- 
ney you're portraying, or if 
you need help from a crook- 
ed source, That's what L.A. 
Law is all about. 

KIM HAVLENA 



Capstone 

(800) 468-8226 

(305) 591-5900 

S59.95 

Circle Reader Service Number 449 



LAP TOP 
SECRETARY 

When you're traveling — 
away from your desk, calen- 
dar, workstation, and other of- 
fice materials — it's easy to 
fall behind because you've 
simply lost track of your 
work in progress. If you 
need to stay organized both 
in the office and on the 
road, Lap Top Secretary is 
your key to success, A DOS 
program that runs fine un- 
der Windows 3.1, LTS will 
track your address book, 
meeting schedules, time 
management sheets, and to- 
do lists. 

The Address Book tracks 
the usual address and 



phone number data, and in- 
cludes an entry for key- 
words you can use to 
search your address book. 
For instance, you could 
mark an address as busi- 
ness, customer, or personal. 
The Meetings menu allows 
you to create and maintain in- 
formation about meetings 
fvleetings may be designat- 
ed as scheduled or unsched- 
uled, depending on your per- 
sonal involvement. You can 
have any number of un- 
scheduled meetings occur- 
ring at the same time, but 
the program won't permit 
you to create simultaneous 
or overlapping scheduled 
meetings. The meeting data 
includes purpose, contact, 
and location information, 
and you can do searches 
on that text data. The main 
LTS screen shows the day's 
activities, and the meeting 
entries change color and 
give you audible warning 
alarms as the meeting time 
approaches. 

The To-Do menu lets you 
track impending tasks, 
along with completion target 
dates and priorities. These 
tasks pop up on the daily ac- 
tivities screen on their target 
dates. The Time Manage- 
ment menu provides an over- 
view of your commitments 
by the day, week, or month. 
It also provides an analytical 
tool that will help you better 
understand how you have 
spent or plan to spend your 
time. Using this tool, you 
can determine how much of 
your time is spent in meet- 
ings, whether or not you've 
been devoting enough time 
to your highest-priority 
tasks, how many tasks you 
have pending, how long 
they've been pending, and 
other important information. 
It might just help you make 
your work habits more effi- 
cient and organized. 

You can have several da- 




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Creative Kids 36* 
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Curse of Enctiantia25*' 
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Just Grandma &Ue3B 
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Learn to Speak Spn59 
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Loom 39 

Lovely Ladies II 49 
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Manhole 49 

Magazine Rack 45 
Manlis 45" 

MarkeSng Master 39 
Mavis Beacon 39 
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Our Solar System 29 
PC Game Ffoom 49 
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Pool Shark 19" 

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While Horse Child 33 
Who Killed Sam Rup25 
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800-448-6658 




HOURS; M-F 9 AM-8 PM SAT 10 AM- 3 PM EST 
PRODUCTINFOiOTHERBUSINE5S;908-398-8880 



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PC Pix Vol 1 Of 2 65 
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Private Collection 65 
Priv. Pictures 1 Of 265 
Seedy Vol 1 -Tea. 65 
Storm 1 Of 2 65 

Visual Fantasy 65 



A Train 39 

Construction Set 22 
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Campaign 34" 

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Caslte ol Dr. Brain 30 
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Champions 35" 

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Comanche 42" 

Mission Disk 25" 
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Cohort 2 19" 

Contiuesl of Japan 35 
Contraption Zak 25" 
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Cybef Space 34" 
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Darkseed 39 

Daritside o( Xeen 39" 
Daric Skin 47" 

Daughter o(Serpnl31" 
Design your Railrd. 35 
Diet Pro DOS/Win25/36 
Dinosaur AdventurB34 
Dog Fight 37" 

Dr Floyd Desktop 19" 
Dr Jam Window 59" 
Dr. Quandry 31 

Dragon Sphere 
Dragon Lair 3 39" 
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Dune 2 36 

Dungeon Master 29" 
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Eight Ball Debc 35" 
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Empre Deluxe 35" 
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Eric the Unready 35" 
Eternam 35" 

Eye of BehoWer 20 
Eye Beholder 2 38 
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Ez Language Series 
Fr,Gr,ir,Sp,Jp,Rs 31" 
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Master Edition 49" 
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Mig 29 Data Disk 34" 
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Fami Creativity Kit 18 
Fatty Bear Birthday 31" 
Fields of Glory 33" 
Flashback 32* 

Flighl Simul A.T.P. 37 
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East USA Seen 39" 

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IHawaii 1 9 

Instant Fadt Loc. 19 

Japan Scenery 19" 

New York 29" 

Paris 29" 

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Front Page Sports 39" 

Fun School: Fred Frag 

Sam Spy .Teddy Br 17 

G-Force 19" 

Games:Summ8r CW35 

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Grand Slam Bridg II 32 

Great Naval Battfe 43" 

Super Ships 20" 

Great Worts 30* 

Gunship 2000 29" 

Scenario Disk 24 

Hardball 3 35 

Data Disk (ea) 17" 

Hairier Assault 34" 

Headline Hany 37 

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High Command 42" 

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Humans 25 

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Incredible Machine29" 

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Inspector Gadget 35" 

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Land Of Lore 34" 

Legacy 39 

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Reader Rabbit 
Reader Rabbit 2 
Ready (or Letter 
Ready Set Read 
Reading Adv in Oz 36 
Reading Comp 32 



29" 
22 
39 
35" 
19" 
35" 
35" 
35" 
29* 



GIMT.GRE.SAT 30 
StudywaiB Biofosy, 

Ca)c.,C)iem„Econ., 

Physics, Statistic 25 
Studyware LSAT 37 
Syndicate 37" 

Take a break X-Word29 

Pinball * 29" 

Task Fores 1942 37" 

Admiral Edit 
Terminator 2029 



43" 
39* 
17" 



Ready Set Head 29* Tesserae 
Realms of Aj'cadia35" Tmintr 2 Cybniwss 35 
Red Baron 39 Tetris CtassiC 31 

Missior Disk 17 Time Riders Amer. 35 
Return 0( Phantm 33" Tony LaflussaBase.17 
Rex Nebular 37 Tony LaRussa II 37* 

RingWorkf 34" Expansion Disk 19* 

Robosports Wind 25* Top Class Series ea 1 6 
Rock i Bach Studo35" Tornado 45* 

Rodney Fun ScreenSI Transartica 35* 

Rome 29" Treasure Cove 35 

Rule Engagment 239" Treasur Math Stomi 35 
Science Adventure 42 Treasure Mountain 35 
Scooter Magic Castl32 Treehouse 35 

Scrabla Deix 32 Tristan Rnbal 29" 

Seal Team 37" Turt» Science 30 

ScrtWeapnLuttwt29* Turtia Tools 69 

Tour of Duty ea. 20 Ultma7 47* 

Seven Cites GoW 38 For^e of Virtue 17 
Shadow President 39* Ul«ma 7 Part 2 47" 
Shadowfands 29" Ultima Trilogy 37" 
Sien^ Adkxi Five 25 Ultima Trilogy 2 47* 
Siena Award Winner47 Ultima Underivorid 47" 
Sierra Family Fun 32 Part 2 47* 

Sierra Starter Bndl 39" Ultrabots 37" 

Saent Service 2 19* Uninvited V/indcw 31 " 
Sim Ant 34* U.S.ASasDOS 31 

Sin City 19" Utopia 29" 

Sim Ah! French 35 VfofVfctory (ea) 42" 
Sim Oty Windows 34* Vegas Games 19" 
Sh) Earth 39" Virtial Realty St 2 59* 

Sim Ue Dos/Wind 39" Vista Pro 73" 

Sing a Long Wind 31" Vocabulary Devi 32 
Snap Dragon 32 Wacky Funsters 19" 

Snoopy Game Oub 29 War In Gulf 29" 

Solitaire Window 29" Wanriof of Legend 19* 

35 Wayne Gretzky 3 35 

36 Waynes Worid 29" 
42 What's My Angle 30 

37* When2Worids War35* 
39" Where Cmin SanDiegp 
35* America Past 34* 
33* Europe 30 

29 Space 44" 
35" Time 30 

31 USA 30 

35 USA Defuxe 44* 

30 Worid D^uxe 44" 
37* WiW Science Arcad35" 

33 WeenrProphecy 34" 

35" WingComandr2 47* 

Star Trek 25th Aniv. 37 Work! CifOiit 34* 
StarTrek Audioaip34" MPE Edifoiv 44" 
Next Generation 38" Worid Tour T8nnis32* 
StarTrek Screen Sav37 X Wing 39" 
Sljckybf Math Tutor 30 Mission Disk 19* 
Stidwtf Pre-Schoo) 30 Yobi Spelling Trick29" 
Stickybf Read Tutor 30 Your Deck 45" 
Slickybf Spell Tutc* 30 Zodiac Signs 39* 
Storybook Weaver29" Zoo Keeper 36 
'- Zug's Spelling Adv 22 

Adv of Eco Island 22 
Dinosaur Worid 22 
Race Thm Space 22 



Solitaires Journey 
Space Ace 2;BorJ 
Space Adventure 
Spacs Hulk 
Space Quest 5 
Spaceward Ho 
Spear ol Destiny 
Special Fofcas 
Spedie 
Spellbound 
Spetteasting 301 
Spell-it Plus 
SpelUammer 
Sports Adventure 
SE- Control 2 



Strike Commander 45' 
Speech Disk 17 

Strip Poker 3 32 
Data Disk (ea) 17 



store; 1060 Randolph Ave. Rahway N.J. 



TERMS AND CONDITIONS 

Master Caid, visa, Anveiicaii Express & 
Discover Accepted. No Surcharge on 
Credit Caids. By mailj P.O- Box 3, 
Carteret, N.J. 07008. All Sales Aie 
Final. NO REFUNDS! Exchange on defective 
merchandise with the saune item only. Ho 
exceptions. All Products are new from 
manufacturer. All claims and guarantees 
ate from the manufacturer . Call for 
current price and availability. GOVERMEHT 
AND SCHOOL P.C'S WELCOMED. For your 
protection, we will only ship to the 
address the credit card company has on 
file, therefore shipping to Ak., Hi., 
PR . , P.O. Boxes, APO/FPO extra. 
International orders call for shipping 
charges. N.J. Resident add 6% sales tax. 
20% restocking fee for all refused itenia. 



Circle Reader Service Number 208 



MORE TIPS 

for Windows Users 



WORDPERFECT 

""WINDOWS 
TIPS 



Ull^ 



101 Essential 

WordPerfect 5.2 

for Windows Tips 




101 Essential Access 
for Windows Tips 

Each book includes 101 tips in an 
easy-to-use format, 

Other books in the series: 
101 Essential Word for Windows Tips 
101 Essential Excel for Windows Tips 
101 Essential Windows Tips 

Books are S9.95 each. To order send Ihe list of books 
desired, appropriale amoynt plus S2.50 (Of shipping and 
handling (U.S.. S* to Canada and S6 other) to COM- 
PUTE Books, CO CCC. 2500 l,icClellan Ave.. Pennsau- 
ken, NJ 08109. (Residents ot NC. NJ. and NV pease 
add appropriale tax: Canadian orders add 7% Goods 
and Services Tax.) VISA and Mastercard accepted; Ire 
si;re to include your account number, expiration date, 
and signaiure. All orders must be paid in U.S. funds 
drawn on a U.S. bank. Orders will be shipped via UPS 
Ground Service. Offer good wtiile supplies last. 



REVIEWS 



tabases, so you can create one set of 
data for daily home office work, for in- 
stance, and anottier with your travel 
scfiedules. You can create these data- 
bases on your home PC and copy 
them to your laptop computer or Wiz- 
ard for portable reference. Lap Top Sec- 
retary will keep you organized at the of- 
fice and on the road. 

CHARLES IDOL 



EXiM 

(800) 424-3946 

$129 95 

Circle Reader Service Miimber 450 

FAILSAFE COMPUTER 
GUARDIAN 

Have you ever wondered how to keep 
casual users from deleting, copying, re- 
naming, or even looking at sensitive or 
secret files? FailSafe Computer Guard- 
ian delivers the solution in a tiny 15K de- 
vice driver or TSR, with a perfect com- 
bination of convenience, security, and 
performance. 

As a member of the single-user, no- 
security old school of computing, I 
tend to find any kind of security cum- 
bersome. FailSafe had to walk a tight- 
rope between staying out of my way 
and protecting my machine from: strang- 
ers — not an easy task. 

The installation is almost a model of 
its kind. It explains itself every step of 
the way and makes only a single 
change to CONFIG.SYS, which it lets 
you review. FailSafe is normally in- 
stalled as a device driver, although you 
can run it as a TSR from the same 
COM fiie if you so choose. The installa- 
tion program can start Windows auto- 
matically, create a group file for the pro- 
gram, and return from Windows. 

You can set FailSafe to watch for 
any possible file operation, such as cre- 
ation, deletion, modification, renaming, 
reading, execution, or modification of at- 
tributes. For any of these categories, 
you can restrict files or groups of files 
using wildcards, explicitly including or 
excluding any combinations thereof. 
FailSafe also offers password protec- 
tion, and you can restrict keyboard ac- 
cess or blank the screen. Custom pro- 
files are available for multiple users or 
groups of users. Corporate users will 
like the fact that FailSafe generates a 
readable log file of all its activities, not- 
ing when attempts are made to ac- 
cess, delete, or copy protected fifes. 

A side effect of FailSafe's operation 
is that it works effectively as a virus 
protection program as well. While it 



doesn't scan specifically for hundreds 
of viruses, as other programs do, its 
general security tactics can arguably 
do a better (albeit somewhat more in- 
trusive) job, since it's constantly on the 
lookout for security violations. 

Remember that it's still possible to de- 
feat a software-based protection 
scheme by interrupting the boot proc- 
ess and inserting a new boot floppy. 




fAILSAFE 

COMPUTERGUARDIAN 



PROTECT & SECURE VOUR SySTE^ 



112 COf^PUTE OCTOBER 1993 



FailSafe Computer Guardian protects your 
valuable files for a nominal price- 

FailSafe includes a coupon for hardware 
disk locks from another company at the 
eminently reasonable price of $25, for 
everything from older PS/2 machines to 
standard PCs to Macintoshes, 

If you need software-based protec- 
tion for your computer, you can't go 
wrong with FailSafe. Priced a good 80 
percent less than much of its competi- 
tion and able to run under both DOS 
and Windows, it's now the computer- 
security package to beat. 

TOIvl CAMPBELL 



Villa Crespo 

(SCO) 521-3963 

(7C8) 433-0500 

S59.95 

Circle Reader Service Number 451 



EPSON LQ-570+ 

It seems that laser printers are all you 
read about nowadays. But if you're 
budget-conscious, you need a lower- 
cost alternative that will still produce pro- 
fessional results. Epson's LQ-570-i- 
might be just what you're looking for. 

Compared to earlier dot-matrix print- 
ers, the LQ-570-f features enhanced 
graphics, faster output, and quieter op- 



Advertisers Index 



Reader Service Number/Adverliser 



Page Reader Service Number/Advertiser 



Page Reader Service Number/Advertiser 



162 

ie9 

268 
157 
244 

152 

173 
21S 
245 
121 
181 
11B 
175 

139 
251 
1SD 
114 
227 
205 

254 



125 
113 
226 
144 



1G1 
131 
253 
203 
275 
143 
16S 

115 
228 
159 
258 
234 



8-Bi! G-7 

Abacus Soltwaie 13 

Access Software 102,103 

AlCS 37 

Amisli Outlaw Shareware Co 120 

AMTEX Software Conporalion 59 

Antigrav Toalkil G-17 

Bare Brjnes Software 120 

Bear Teclinologies G-17 

BesI Personalized Books 117 

Blue Valley Software 124 

Body Cello 122 

BioOerbund 43 

BR, ROMS 122 

Caloke Industries G-21 

Cell Micro 119 

Chips & Bits 21 

Citizen American Corp 6,7 

CMD/Creaiive Micro Design G-11 

Colorado Speclmrrt 16 

CompSult 124 

CompSult G-23 

Coniplons NewMedia 48 

CompuServe — 33 

Computer Business Services 116 

Computer Friends, Inc ., 120 

Corapulet Technolooies •..'...■ G-ll 

Comlrad ■ 15 

Coratrad 115 

Creative LaUs - - 3 

Ctealive Pixels Ltd ■ G-21 

Crosley Software 122 

CyberOreams 91 

I. KEnlerprises 117 

Dechlar 106 

Delptil 1 

DemoSource 118 

Disks O'Pienty G-lO 

Disk-Count Software HI 

OR. T's Music Softuvare 50 

Electronic Arts 61 

Electronic Arts 56,57 

FGM Connection G-23 

Free Spirit Software 107 

Genovalion Inc 121 

Grapevine Group, The G-17 

Grolier IFC 

Horse Fealliers Graphics G-10 



129 



300 
200 
231 



170 
197 

178 

184 
255 
260 
19S 
158 
211 

289 
191 

141 
248 

186 
250 



107 
103 
153 
207 
256 



241 
163 
212 
111 

Its 

171 

148 
109 
126 
166 
190 



Humongous 

HyperLigtil Enterprises . 

IBM 

IBM 

ID Solrware 

Jack Daniels 

Jackson Marking Products Co. Inc. 



, 71 
120 

, . 5 

. 53 
101 

. 49 
116 



Jasmine Mullinedia 31 

JP PBM Products by Mail G-21 

Keystone Softwfe G-ll 

KF-PD Software G-7 

Kid Secure ol America 117 

UCE 123 

Landmark Solutions, Inc 121 

Logitech 27 

Logitech 44,45 

Mad Man Software G-9 

Mallard 35 

Maxis 99 

MicroLeague Sports 55 

Microsoft 72.72 

MicroStorm Software G-17 

Needham's Electronics, Inc 118 

Odyssey OnLine 122 

Origin 85 

Parsons Tecfinology 23 

Patch Panel Software 122 

PC Enterprises 124 

Pendragon Software Library 124 

Penthouse Interactive CD-ROM 98 

Penthouse Modem 125 

Penthouse QnLlne 109 

Perlormance Peripherals Inc G-21 

Pixel Perfect 105 

Profit Group, The US 

Pure Eiitertalnment 94 

Q Enterprises Software G-17 

Quadra 47 

ReadySoft 85 

SaleSoft Systems inc 122 

School of PC Repair 116 

SeXXy - - - 124 

Shareware Central 122 

Sierra OnLine BC 

Smart Luck Software 124 

SoftShoppe 120 

SoftVision International 121 

Software Support International G-5 



210 



145 
201 
154 
203 
130 
179 
176 
147 
247 
193 
242 
3D1 
127 
132 
IBS 
172 
128 



Software Support International 116 

Software Toolworks 25 

SOGWAP Software G-9 

SOMICH Enterprises , . , , , 122 

Spectrum Holobyte 40,41 

Spirit of Discovery Bl 

Star Micronics 11 

Slar^3re Publishing Corp 123 

SubLogic 62,63 

Tek-Shop 11B 

Thrustmaster 123 

Turtle Beach Systems 87 

Turtle Beach Systems .87 

Tycom inc G-21 

U.S. Robotics IBC 

Value Software Inc 120 

Virgin Cannes 78,79 

Walnut Creek CDROM 120 

Wedgwood Computer 124 

Windows 900 118 

WOLySchool of Computer Training 17 



Product Mart 115,117,118,119,120,121,122,123,124 

Classfteds 125,126,127 

104 COMPUTE Books 9B,112G-10 

OMNI Books 99 



COMPUTE Editor 900 Line 109 

COMPUTE'S SharPak Disk Subscription 77 

Gazefte Disk Subscription G-9 

Gazelle Index G-17 

Gazette Productivity Manager G-19 

Gazette Specially Disks G-13 







CREDITS 

Cover: photography by Mark Wagoner, mon- 
itor from NEC (displaying Franklin Quest's As- 
cend; page 4: Ramon Gonzalez Teja/lmage 
Bank; page 8: © 1993 Theo Rudnak/SIS; 
page 18: Mark Wagoner; page 22: Mark Wag- 
oner; page 24: Mark Wagoner; page 34: 
Mark Wagoner; page 67: © 1993 Cary Hen- 
rie/SIS; pages 74-75: Mark Wagoner; page 
76: © 1993 Rogert Neubecker/SIS; pages 
82-83: Mark Wagoner; pages 88-89: Mark 
Wagoner; page 92: © 1993 Jude Maceren/ 
SIS; page G-3: © 1993 Ken Coffelt/SIS, 


IMPORTANT NOTICE 

FOR 

COMPUTE DISK 

SUBSCRIBERS 

COMPUTE ofTers two different disk products for 
PC readers: the SharePak disk and PC Disk, 
SharePak is monthly and has a subscription 
price of $59,95 for 5V4-inch disks and $64,95 for 
3' /2-inch disks, A subscription to SharePak 
does not include a subscription to the maga- 
zine, PC Disk appears in odd-numbered 
months and has a subscription price of $49,95, 
which includes a subscription to COMPUTE, You 
can subscribe to either disk or to both, but a 
subscription to one does not include o subscrip- 
tion to the other 



OCTOBER 1993 COMPLJTE 113 



REVIEWS 



eration, I did most of my test- 
ing from Windows, where 
the LQ-570+ driver does a 
great job of taking advan- 
tage of the new-and-im- 
proved graphics capabiii- 
ties. You'll have a hard time 
finding a dot-matrix printer 
that can produce better re- 
sults for letters and reports. 
The pages printed about 
twice as fast as with my HP 
IIP laser printer, even with 
largely graphical docu- 
ments. And don't count out 
this dot-matrix printer be- 
cause your office already 
has too much noise. This 
printer doesn't feature the 
usual bumps and grinds as- 
sociated with pin printers. It 
makes about as much noise 
as my hard drive at bootup. 

The manual boasts of 
easy letterhead printing — I'll 
admit that I hadn't yet 
learned this trick, even with 
my laser printer. After sever- 
al false starts, I carefully 
read the manual and got it 
right. Single-feeding of nor- 
mal envelopes was very 
easy, and the results were 
very nice. As a matter of 
fact, I found feeding single 
sheets as easy with this print- 
er as with any I'd ever used. 

If you're working with 
DOS-based software that 
doesn't directly support the 
LQ-570-H, you can use a ge- 
neric Epson 24-pin driver, or 
you can embed the proper 
codes in your document 
manually, using the compre- 
hensive listing of printer com- 
mands in the manual. 

The printer has a wide va- 
riety of built-in fonts, includ- 
ing Roman, Sans Serif, Cou- 
rier Prestige, Script, and oth- 
ers. Many of these include 
proportional versions, which 
print characters at their true 
width, so you don't end up 
with a lot of space around 
the letter /, for instance- 
This makes your documents 
more readable and profes- 

114 COMPUTE OCTOBER 1993 



sional-looking. 

If you're not ready to take 
the laser plunge, you'll find 
that this printer is on the lead- 
ing edge of dot-matrix tech- 
nology, and it offers a long 
list of very nice features that 
might just be all you need. 

RICHARD C. LEINECKER 

Epson 

(800) 289-3776 

$349 

Circle Reader Service Nunrber 452 



EL-FISH 



Maxis had us playing with 
bugs in SimAnt and stirring 
the primordial soup in 
SimLife. Now the king of ec- 
centric simulations invites us 
to take a dive with El-Fish, a 
software toy bound to make 
your head swim. The 
world's first interactive elec- 
tronic aquarium lets you 
catch, breed, and evolve 
fish, and then watch them 
frolic in your specially de- 
signed tanks. 

Stocking and managing 
your aquariums are remark- 
ably easy. To catch new 
fish, simply cast your line on- 
to the ocean map and reel 
them in. Keep the ones you 
like and toss the rest back 
in. Your final selections can 
be used as they are, or you 
can breed them with other 
fish to spawn new varieties. 
You can even speed up the 
machinery of life and evolve 
your species to a dazzling 
new order or strange muta- 
tion. The program uses a 
complex algorithm to simu- 
late genotype-to-phenotype 
conversion — in other words, 
artificial life. The final results 
of this chaotic progression 
are both beautiful and unpre- 
dictable, but always intrigu- 
ing and surprising. 

The ultimate step to aquat- 
ic glory is to animate the 
fish, using a 3-D imaging 
process that generates up 



to 256 frames of ultrarealis- 
tic movement. Unfortunately, 
this stage requires intense 
computation, pushing your 
system's power to its limits. 
For example, animating a nor- 
mal-sized fish on a 25-MH2 
386DX machine takes from 
three to four hours. Add a 
math coprocessor chip — a 
highly recommended 

move — and this time is re- 
duced to 25-35 minutes. On 
a 33-MHz 486DX, complete 
animation takes less than 10 
minutes. The stunning, life- 
like results are well worth 
the wait. Fish can be ren- 
dered in standard 256-color 
VGA or high-resolution 
VESA Super VGA. 

Creating a fish tank, on 
the other hand, offers in- 
stant gratification. Among 
your design tools are 48 
sets of bottom gravel, 60 dif- 
ferent backgrounds, 42 spe- 
cies of plants, a variety of 
bac)<;ground music scores, 
and dozens of often-humor- 
ous scanned foreground ob- 
jects (both stationary and an- 
imated). You can even cre- 
ate your own artwork or 
MIDI soundtrack and import 
it directly into the program. Fi- 
nally, the program can pro- 
duce genetically coded fish 
eggs, called roe, to ex- 



change among fellow enthu- 
siasts. Services such as Com- 
puServe and GEnie contain 
a gallery of user-created 
roe. Serious ichthyologists, 
beware; The program's de- 
piction of its various fish spe- 
cies is purely a fantasy. In 
fact, beneath the surface, 
there's surprisingly little sub- 
stance to this software toy. 
The fish exhibit no personal- 
ity or distinguishing traits, 
and they fail to react to their 
surroundings and other fish. 
Likewise, fish owners can 
do little more than tap food 
into the tank and stare as 
they slowly nibble. The de- 
signers should have pro- 
grammed real-life character- 
istics such as aggression, 
sickness, and spontaneous, 
erratic behavior. Although 
these electronic fish never 
die, they don't appear to do 
much living, either. 

El-Fish succeeds in captur- 
ing only a limited aspect of 
the aquarium experience. 
It's a fascinating concept, 
but under close tnspection, 
it just doesn't hold water. 

SCOTT A MAY 



Maxis 

(510)336-2447 

$59,95 

Circle Reader Service Number 453 ^ 



SPEAK UP! 

Is there a hardware or software product 

you'd like to see reviewed in COMPUTE? 

Let us know by calling 

(900) 884-8681, extension. 7010103. 

The call will cost 95 cents per minute, 

you must be 18 or older, 

and you must use a touch-tone phone. 

Sponsored by Pure Entertainment, 

P.O. Box 186, Hollywood, California 90078. 



ADVERTISEMENT 



TECHNOIOGV UPDATE 




Could this be your dogl 



Neiu product bi/ Radio Fence creates a hidd en barrier to ke ep your dog 
in your yard and out of trouble. Finally, you can protect your dog from 
traffic and otlwr dangerous situations loithout locking him in a pen. 



By Cliarhv Anion 



AH dog owners have 
the same dilem- 
i ma. On one hand 
they want to give their dog 
the freedom to roam and 
exercise. On the other 
hand, they are worried 
about his safety. 

Up until now the only 
solution was to install a 
costly conventional fence. 
Not anj'more! 
No leashes or cages. 
Now there's Radio Fence, 
the breakthrough alterna- 
tive for dog owners. Radio 
Fence is an underground 
electrical barrier which 
works with a receiver on 
your dog's collar. It beeps 
your dog when he nears 
the boundary and gives 
him a small electrical cor- 
rection if ho tries to cross 
it. It keeps your dog safe 
and out of trouble without 
having to resort to expen- 
sive fences, runs ropes or 
chains that could injure 
your pet. 

A hidden barrier. Radio Fence acls as a hidden 
ba rrier [ha 1 gives your dog access (o the whole yard 
but inhibits liis movements into unvv.inted arens. 
Your prize-ivinning rose garden or poo! will be 
safe. Unlike standard fences, Radio Fence docs not 
detract from the beauty of your home or lawn. 



A hidden barrier that only 
your dog knows is there... 

■ No more ugly, expensive fences 

■ No more restrictive enclosures 

■ No more ruined flower beds 

■ No more kr^ocked over trash cans 

■ No more complaining neighbors 

■ No more worrying about your 
dog's safety or protection 




Safety and freedom. 

Radio Fence will work 
with any size or breed 
of dog. The correction, 
which is similar lo a 
static electricity charge, 
will not hurt your pet 
in any way. 

Pius Radio Fence 
meets all FCC require- 
ments, ensuring your 
dog's safety and giving 
you peace of mind. 
Custom boundary. 
With Radio Fence, you 
will receive 500 feet of 
wire that can be easily in- 
stalled in just two lo three 
hours. The wire will ac- 
commodate up to a 
half -acre yard. The Radio 
Fence System also in- 
cludes a transmitter with 
a signal powerful enough 
(o broadcast lo approxi- 
mately two acres. If you 
want to expand your 
(?adio Fence boundaries, 
simply order an addi- 
tional roll of wire. 

Easy training. By spending just fifteen min- 
utes a da\' working with your dog, he will be ful- 
ly trained in six to seven days. Radio Fence is more 
effective than other systems because it allows your 
pet to control the corrective treatment (which is 
definite but mild) and he soon learns to avoid it. 



Radio Fence creates a hidden barrier around 
your yard that safely contains your pet. 




HOW DOES IT WORK? 



Mk crystal-tutted transmitter plugs into a standard outlet and anils 

** n radio signal timt travels along an underground xoire. (The 

ivirc only needs to be buried an inch or txvo to prevent anyone from 

ihcidentally cutting or tripping over it.) Tlie four-ounce receiver, 

worn on your pet's existing collar, picks up the radio signal and alerts 

him as lie nears the hidden boundary tluit you have customized for 

your yard. If lie crosses the boundary, he 
Keep your dog sale and out ■ - ' 

oi trouble with Radio Fence. "''" receive a small, electrical correction. 




You can train as many dogs as you want on the 
same system as long as they are each wearing 
a receiver collar. 
Affordable fence. The 
maintenance-free design, 
low initial investment, 
and ease of installation 
offer tremendous sav- 
ings. Other solutions 
could cost you thousands 
of dollars. Radio Fence is 
the economical and ef- 
fective alternative to 
unsightly fencing. 

Three easy payments of $66. To introduce 
this product, we are offering it directly to you for 
a limited time at a special price. If you order now, 
Radio Fence is yours for only S198. In fact, 
credit card customers can have the Radio Fence 
System in three easy monthly installments of $66 
(plus $16 S&H). To train more dogs on one Radio 
Fence System, order additional receivers for 
only Si 29 each, or you can make three payments 
of $43 (plus $8 S&H). 

Try it risk free. At Comtrad, we back al! our 
products with a "No Questions Asked" money- 
back guarantee, if you're not completely satisfied 
for any reason, just return Radio Fence within 60 
days for a full refund. Radio Fence also comes 
with a one-year manufacturer's warranty and a 
one-year unconditional lightning %varranty. 
Radio Fence. The Radio Fence System includes 
a transmitter, a Ught\\'eight receiver for your pef s 
collar, an antermae, the boundary' cable and the 
complete installation and training manual. Plus, 
you'll receive a helpful video that will make 
installation and training extremely simple. 

Radio Fence System S 198 $16S&H 

Additional Receiver... $129 S8S&H 

Credit card customers 3 payment of S66 SI 6 S&H 

Please mention promotional code 032-CL(1108. 
For fastest service call toll-free 24 hours a day 

800-992-2966 



To order by mail send check or money order for the 
total amount including S&H (VA residents add 4.5% 
sales tax). Or just charge it to your credit card, en* 
closing your account niimtier nnd expiration date* 



INDUSTRIES 

2820 Waterford Lake Drive Suite 106 
Midlothian, Virginia 23113 



FREE 486 Computer 
Color Monitor, Printer 

You can earn $2,000 to $10,000 per month 
from your kitchen table providing needed ser- 
vices for your community. Computer Business 
Services needs individuals to run a computer 
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we will give you a FREE 486 computer, VGA 
color monitor, 80 meg hard drive and a print- 
er. If you already have a computer, we will give 
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Rather than setting up offices all over the 
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tRtt CBS1486 SX Computer ^^^^^. ^^ p^vide our services and letting every- 
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Call or write for a free 3 hour cassette tape and color literature and find out how 
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1^800'343'8014, ext. 303 

(in Indiana 317-758-4415) Fax to: (317) 758-5827 Or Write: 

Computer Business Services, Inc*, CBSl Plasa, Ste, 303, Sheridan, IN 46069 




j-ff r-v-f-r 



COMPUTE'S Product Mart 

is a special advertising section designed to benefit you, the PC direct 
marketer, by letting you advertise directly to the readers that buy. We offer: 



• Marketing Assistance 

Each ad receives a complenrien- 
tary reader service rnumber 
that generates a targeted 
sales lead mailing list. 

Qualified Readers 

Our readers search the Product 
Mart for quality hardware, 
software, and peripheral 
products they can buy. 



'Guaranteed Audience 

Our rate base is guaranteed at 
275,000 per issue, with an 
actual monthly circulation of 
over 300.000. 

' Cost Effectiveness 

Ad sizes range from Vs (2V8 
X 3) to % page, and you can 
request frequency rates of 
up to 12 times per year. B/W, 
2/color and 4/color availability 



Space closing: The 15th of the third month preceding issue date (e.g. May issue 
closes February 15th). Space limited to a first-reserved, first-served basis. 



For ad specifications or more information call 

Lucille Dennis 

Telephone (707) 451-8209 • Fax (707) 451-4269 



Call now to reserve your space! 



x^^*' 




* SIGNS nND 
> RUBB6R STAMPS 

for your OLun use or q 
profitable sideline business 



Self-Inking and traditional 
knob handle stamps can 

be made for less tnan $1. 

Retail prices will start in 

the $10+ range. 



Informationai signs, nameplates, 

control panels, name badges, 

and hundreds of other signage 

items can be made for pennies 

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)(1CKS0K HARKING PRODUOS CO. INC 

BrownsviHe Rd.. D-200, Mt, Vemon, IL 6286J 
Phone: 800-851-4945 Fax: 618-248-77J! 



Circle Reader Service Number 231 



LIQUIDATIONS 
CLOSEOUTS & BARGAINS 



U you (hint you can'l afford 
quijity commcnrial s^ff^arc 
... [hink if;ain! Although we 
carry [lie top lOOsofrwarchils 
aad a full line of accessories 
for yourlBM compatible, we 
specialize in cloKcouts, liqui- 
dations aod CD ROM soft- 
Wkie at rock Kottoia prices! 
Let us dp the bargain ha nti ng 
for you! Find out wby thou- 
sands of computer users 
choose us as their one stop 
software supplier. 
We puSlish one of the best 
catalogs in the industry. Call 
Of write for your fiec copy! 

SOFTIUflHE Software Supponlntematioml 

>n,$!Sj 2700N.E.Andie«nRd. 

;jp.--rjX Suite *A-10 

"^ Vancouver Wa 98661 

(206)655-lJ9J 



C-D •J(p^( Tramples 
Toryour 'PC 

The Animals tlMS 

C:CA Windows JI5.95 

Colossal Cookbook ...HS.95 

Encyclopedia v5pO J47.95 

Jones in Fast Une ......SI7.9S 

Night Owl v9 J24.95 

Pto Phone 1992 J32.9S 

Shareware Eitr^v J37.95 

So ,Moch Scretnware .... 125.95 
Sound Sensations „...,. S15.95 
TcoMinyTHieronB ....S15.95 

VGA Speetnim vZ S18.95 

Willy Beamish Sn.95 

Phjsicil Titnpy XXX SI 9.95 

Rimfiie Pacfic XXX .... $34.95 
Visual Faiila.<ic.i XXX .. S24.95 



CAU. TOU 

rjtKX roDAtt 



Major Credit Ca/ds Accepted . 



AfeoWTXimpleidoii'l include S/H chjipi. Ci II m wiiu toriktiill. 



Circle Reader Service Number 210 

I" — — — — — — ^ 

I Be a computer . 
repair expert! 

' Professional-level home 

I study teaches you PC re- 
pairs, troubleshooting, 
upgrading, installation, 
I and servicing. 
Increase your value as 
Ian employee or open your 
own business. No high- 
tech knowledge, no ex- 
I pensive instruments. 
Free career literature, 

, 800 223-4542 




Addrpss _ 
Cilv 



Phone ( L 



. Zlp_ 



116 



I 

I The School of PC Repair 

' 6065 Rosewell Road 

I Dcpl, JL6S002. Atlanta, GA 30328 | 

Circle Reailer Service Numlier 111 



With Best Personalized Books own a lifetime license for a patented 
product that will please adults, delight and educate children, and return high 
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That's the sure-fire success formula 
that Best Personalized Boob offers to 
distrihiitors who are huilding strong, 
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As the leader in the industry- Best 
Personalized Books has exclusive 
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for Bugs Bunny '" and The Looncy 
Tunes™ and from the National Footbal 
League {N.F.L.'«). 

Best Personalized Books become instant 
favorites because the child 
is the star of each story and 




friends and relatives join 
in on ever)i adventure. An 
extensive atray of titles 



For Just $1495 start your own highly profitable business 
creatins personalized children's books with a computer. 



appeal to a wide range of ages and tastes, ;ind includes well-written stories on 
religious and erhnic themes that reinforce family values. 

"^k'-b^SS No computer experience is necessary' to 

create Best Personalized Books. A compre- 
hensive training manual shows you how to 
personalize a hook in just minutes- And 
^' with Best's strong marketing program, you'll 
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work at home, on location at malls, craft 
fairs, flea markets, home parties, or in 
conjunction with local businesses or funiJ- 
raising groups. 
Strong dealer support is a priority, as is the 
^ commitment to helping you make even bigger 
; >' profits with other popular personalized products 
' 4r including clocb, audio cassette 

tapes, birth announcements, 
calendars and stationen' for 
teens and adults. 



(t14) 3SS-38M 

Call or wnte for free sample book and information kH 

Best Personalized Books holds US patent 5213461 to produce personalized books. Barbie"', Bugs Bunny"', The Looney Tunes"', the N.F.L."' and associated 
trademarks are owned and used under exclusive licenses from Mattel Toys, inc., Warner Bros, and the National Football League. 



Best Pf fs§iiiijif«! Books Inc^ 

Best Nnonalixed Plaia • 4350 Sisma Drive • Mlas, T«ui 75S44 




;kiD \ 



SECURE 




This extraordinary program 
provides a sense or "se(urily" 

by providing a complete 

identijication of a child should an 

emergency occur. 

• A Business You Can Be Proud Of 

• Full or Part Time 

• Continued Dealer Support 



Turnkey Package - Computer, 
printer, software, ID system sjpplii 
and training just S6995.00 



les 



CAll TODAY for 
[NFORMATION 



214-248-9100 

3216 Commander Dr. 
Suite 10 1 • Oept 27 
Carrollton, TX 75006 



Kicole R. Allen 


F 




wkti m\m 


!2/t5/« 


Bro 


Bro 


«l 


1 ISA 


Jjw I Nirii Ul« 
IZ3 (bin Street 


Hone 


Ot 




This 
spot 
is 
seen 

liy 
more 

tiian 

300,000 

readers 

eacii 

montii. 



^m^ ^cf^ Pt<^ 



With our process and a computer you can instantly produce the highest 
quality personalized children's books and stationery on the market 
today. 

All books are hardbound with full color Illustrations and laser quality 
printing. Ideally suited for home based business, malls, department 
stores, fairs or mall order. 
Very simple to operate and highly profitable- 
Only a limited number of dealerships available. 



For a (omplete information packet call today. 

D&K ENTERPRISES, INC. • 3216 COMMANDER DRIVE 
SUITE 101 • DEPT 27 • CARROLLTON, TEXAS 75006 



117 



C:\CALL\WiNDOWS.900 



File Edit Searc h _Dial 1-900-454-4370 69c per minute; 



WINDOWS 900 

The Number One Shareware Source For: 

^Business ® Programming & Games 
^Utilities & Fonts -^Graphics 



New! Easier To Use! 




DOLT AREA! 



Must be 18 
over to call . 



1 



Use Your High-Speed Modem And Call: 



900-454-4370 



2400 bps- 14.4bps V.32/bis V.42'bis 8,N,1 



HO CREDIT CARDS 
'^ MEMBERSHIP 
ST, EASY ACCESS 
LONG DISTANCE CHARGES 




UJ. 



[#1 



circle Reader Service Number 128 



m 



oice 
Mail 
Cash 
Machine 



.WiW4.'4WsWv«Ws^4^N<«<ft, 



i| Press 1 for 

p sales, 2 for 

p? service, 3 for .^, 

th live operator 3 

•'A •Hi 



iVtake thousands of dollars effort! esslyhy inslaLingaSigmOu;/! voice 
package in your 286/3 86. Use it to answer your home-office phone, rent 
pocket-pagers, advertise products, or operate a pay-per-call service 
using major credit cards, passwords or a nationwide 900 #. 

To get slarted, order our ^25 PC Opportunity Toolkit, It contains ail 
Itie information you need & its cost is applied to all future purchases. 



A Few Home- Based Ventures Featured In Our ^5 Toolkit! 



BigmOuth 

voicc/faji/pagcf 

^KlnderChek 

]Atdl]£cy cbiU 
. ^2250. (Dsmo '25) 



fDemoSource'" 



QuickUne 

write programs 

iD QDiJic 

y'17d5. (Demo'25) 

'Rise'n'Shlne 

wakC'Up £ 

rem! Oder service 

.M995. (Demo i25) 



/ClientCaller 

outbound 

pftjspeciof 

.M450.CD6mo ^25) 



TollBridge 

seU long 

disiiancc Umc 

n995.(Demo ^25) 



TRY 



our demofinel 818 718-9560 



The Voice Application Suj 
• ••• 



uper store 
• • • 



KJ45 nas«li it. Sli 202 
Nor«Hii>a>, CA 9132* USA 




• Easy to use software, on-line help, 
full sceen editor 

• Made In USA 

• 1 & 2 Ysar Warranty 

• Technical Support by ptione 

■ 30 day Money Back Guarantee 
' FREE software upgrades available via BBS 

• Demo SW via BBS (EMZOBEIVIO.EXE) |PB1DDEM0,EXE) 

■ E|e)proms 2716 -8 megabit, 16 bit 27210-27240, 27C400& 27C800 

■ Flash 28F256-28F020, (29C255-29CO10 (EMP-20 only)) 

■ Micros 8741A, 42A,42AH, 48,49.48H, 49H, 55, 87C51, B7C51FX, 870751,752 

■ GAL, PLD from NS, Lattice. AMD-1BV8, 20VB, 22V10 (E/VIP-20 only) 



I ■ i»j 1^ ■»rA 



NEEDHAM'S ELECTRONICS, INC. 



4539 Orange Grove Ave. 
Sacramento, CA 95841 
(Monday-Friday, 8 am-5 pm PST) 



C.O.D. 



(916)924-8037 

BBS (916) 972-8042 
FAX (916) 972-9960 



Circle Reader Service Number 191 



SOFTWARE BLOWOUT! 



Lotus Works 1.0 - $8.00 

PFS Window Works 1.0 -- $12.00 

Spinnaker 8nl -- $10.00 

Prodigy Starter Kits - $5.00 

Megafortress Mega-Pak - $20.00 

MS-Windows 3.0 -- $8.00 

450 Truetype Font Pak -- $24.00 

DR-DOS 5.0 -$4.00/ 6.0 -$15.00 

Grollier's MPC Encyclopedia CD-ROM 

4>JD.U0 (OEM Version) 

Mammals or Animals CD-ROM 

^pZU. 00 (OEM Versions) 

Quantities Very Limited - Act Fast! 



_ ^ 

To order, call 24 hours: " 
800.283.4759 B 



Call(713)-277-1717 

Fax Inquires (7 13)-277-3525 

All Ordcti Shipped COD. AU Pricirg Subject To Chaise WKhoul Nolice . Alt Pricing 
limited To InTcnMrjOBHaDd ONLYI JH.OOMimniimi OrdcrPlMic. JZS.OONSTFei. 
Pricing Rtflecti Onb DJKOUJII. Ocr 250 lierai In Slock ■■ Call For Complete Lilting Of 
CJur Current lotenlory. Open M-F, ID AM To 6 PM, CST. 



'' We Buy Software - Fax Us Your List ** 



circle Reader Service Number 131 



Circle Reader Service Number 176 



J^^g^T HE ULTIMATE IN MULTIMEDIA! 



NOW AVAILABLE WITH VOICE 



Sound board 

AdLib',' Sound Blaster'Pro il. Covox'and 

Disney'sound source compatible. 
opl3 fm stereo synthesizer generating 
20 voices with 4 operators. 
stereo production and playback of 
sounds from four sound sources, 
sampling rate of 4khz to 44. 1 khz. 
adpcm decompression up to 4: 1 . 

BUILT-IN MIDI AND GAME INTERFACE. 
4 WATT AMPUnER DHiVEN THROUGH 2 SPEAKERS. 
16B1T BUILT IN AT CD-ROM INTERFACE. 
TWO STEREO SPEAKERS. 



CD-ROM 

DISK CAPACITY: 630MB -modez- 

DATA TRANSFER: 175KB/SEC.->.ode2- 

ACCESS TIME: 350MS 

INTERFACE: AT 

MEMORY BUFFER: 32KB 

WINDQWS'"3.1 DRIVERS. WlNDOWS'"DlGITAL 
AUDIO TRANSPORT, MONOLOGUE, SOUND SCRIPT., 
JUKEBOX, SOUND TRACKS AND MICROSOFT 
CD EXTENSION. .. _ _ — 



RECOGNITION 

CD Titles 

TOOLWORKS MULTIMEIDIA 

ENCYCLOPEDIA: 21 VOLUME SET. 33,000 

PICTURES. 35 MINUTES OF VIDEO AND 35 

MINUTES OF SOUNDS. 

WORLD ATLAS: 240 DETAILED VGA 

COLOR MAPS. 

US ATLAS; FULL COLOR MAPS OF ALL 

STATES. 

C3AME: PACK li: CHESSMASTER 2100, 

BRUCE LEE, LIFE & DEATH, BEYOND THE 

BLACK HOLE. LOOPZ, CRIBBAGE KING. PUZZLE 

GALLERY, BACKGAMMON Sc ROBOT TANK. 



NOW YOU CAN TEACH YOUR COMPUTER TO RESPOND TO YOUR VOICE 
COMMANDS FOR DOS OR WiNDOWS. PACKAGE INCLUDES HEADSET WITH MICROPHONE, VOICE RECOGNITiON MODULE AND WlhiDOWS 
AND DOS SOFTWARE. ADD VOiCE COMMANDS TO EDUCATIONAL. BUSINESS AND ENTERTAINMENT PROGRAMS WITH ANY MEDLE" '"-'" 



^Mm/eU^. IS ALSO AVAILABLE iN SCSI CD-ROM '270MS-300KB/SEC." . 



MlCKt 



IN CAUFORNIA & INTERNATIONAL DIAL 7 1 4^830-2355 PS^,^lL™° «5Sw ^^ '^'^' 
24 HOUR FAX 7 1 4/830-37 1 2 ' ' '' 

MEDLEva MEDLEY PLUS ARE TR4DEMAR 



AMERICAN BUSINESS PHONE BOOK..$23- 1 OO'S OF CD TITLES 

REFERNCE LIBRARY $23" AVAILABLE AT 90% Or: 

PUBLISH IT 2.0 Wrm CUP ART $21* cispwiTU Hpn. cv' 

'Wi,h<htmrd^i,i,nudtr,i SHP WITH mEDUEY: 



Circle Reader Service Number 118 



MejaDemaSTesI i 
conlains 35D Megs ,^ 
al PC Shareware &PD ^ 
sgttwars. Including Special "^ 
CD-ROM Benchmark and TeslUtililles ^ 
written Ijv our pragramming stafl. & HOT 
available an any oilier CD-ROM Discs. Our 
Special TesI tJlilitles niEasure Ihmugliput 
as well as access lime in a reliable and 
cunslsteut manner tor a nteaningful 
real-world benchmark for CD drives. 
The Disc anil Interface Sottivare are \^--- 
fully liincllonal (Even lor BBS Use| and ^ 
not crippled In any way. Wben purchased 
separately Mega Dcme and Test is S14.aD 
plus S6.DD for SSH However for a Llmlled 
Time Tliis Demo and Test CD-ROM Disc 
Is Free wllh any CD Disc purchase. 

These are the Only Shareware & PD 

CD-ROM Discs Willi both a DOS, 

and a Windows 3.1 "Hypertext" 

Retrieval Interlace. Plus All CD 

Discs are BBS Ready, and Include 

files. bits plus our BBS Door wilh 

"Reiiiolc User Moiisealile 

Piili-Down Menu Inlerface. 

PROFIT PRESS, 824 E. Ft. laweil, 

Tucson , AZ S5T1 9 • Info (6D2) 770-0000 

FAX (602) T70-OOQ5 ■ BBS (G02| 770-OODS 

The }irlce$ listed absve ia not Include 

shipping and handling. Special shippina and 

shipping la loralgn cdunlties Is avallihla. 



iMastfalClSHl 




SONY 

Caddies $3.50 
each with 

ANY $49.00 
CD-ROIVI 

Disc Purchase 
Limit of 10 

Per Customer 



ST RELEASED! New! «|r^ 



#tD=ROW 'f^^iralowsi 'fames'. 



c Sftirstiiiia Specliculsi 

. ^ Megs 1 Pkc Ggs UnovnptBSsed! 
\ OLfT NewKl r The Mega CDflOW 
I Seres. ConsareUtiSiiBScfAlTvpes, 

Wad Piti^Qora, 03ta Base, 

' CormiracatiariG.Giaptiics Tools. CAE), 

Busnesa Edusftn, Pfogf*™rifig, 

Hobby, Ganes, Sooite. SfXrel Ffes. 256 

Co& GIFs, FLTs. Bbles, Fcrts. \^Wdws 

Progiams, BBS, Plus Muitv Mas! 



Our fJewest 11 Sie Mega Wrdo*s Series. 

The Dk Ctxi(3iis Wndws LWfce fl* Aa 

TypK, Wndows Apobcaton Programs <i 
Aa T^ies. Wrelnvs Cornriiijnicaliais 
PrDorams, ViriQois ^nws, Wndtwre 

Faas> Wfrimra ffiS Coksr Graphics .BMP , 
IVmcbws S(uid Res .WAV, Wndcne 

Dwers and Jffljrs. pks 0&2 Shawtare. 
and Much Mu^Moe^, 



CofiJaiB PC Games km ShareA'ara 
ComparHs sidi as Apcgee, aid ^. 
pOs riBnv many txhers. Game Bytes 
Eledrty^ Msga^H Mtli fte caiegorss 
ha rtAxJa An»*, Adveffijfe. Rjzifes, 

Mnl & Sl:^«y. War Game^ Card 
Games, F¥^ GfiDGS. Rue 26& Cobr 
GiFs, HJs o( al lipes & IraiJdK Sound 

Res. i*30, .FOl, .WAV & .VOC 




itbett 



TTe Qsc Cortara hteckng, PhrKfjig, Tore Bat Mcmacn. kefli>/. 
SttedUe. Macp, Vtoma I CarpJsf Ssastf SeaSE. Bent Pbre. 
FBI i Pte Nd Ftes. VKe Co*, Sa & Tinted Grates, UFO, 

CdhI, Even hfein Rafc fte. PUs f.1u*i ^*I*l fij^ Et^ymo Fai 
and rETEsag "ReI AbsokJt*/ No Oe Vians You b Ktow toJJ 
Wj*s Meg&ar* kriiTCEe FaairfiQnfl Lae hi^ Ted Saectfies. 1 
(5i You Ca-s] fcr ^ fiee's fe±fcs His fttegsDxr and h-fe^Tamrri 



OwEakshe! 

$39.00 




ORDERS ONLY! CALL TOLL FREE 

■800-843-7990 




V/m Proof LsbeS' 
Eadi IM( GOO Meff^y&s 
MaV U* On WO 1 !3 ■ 256 CoSir SWl 
afsviiDiWOBBSLtqMJ FltsMiraled 
ms. GL's. & [X"s. Irdudes Game, and 




Velumes 1.2, i 3 
ftwAdultsOrty 
■WtePrajlUb*- 
ZSeCKorSVEftGIFs 
Hus yVimfflsJ RJ's, GL's & OL'S 
Indutjes Ganvs,, & Rnasy Text RIes. 
3 Dec Set ! J!E Msgs - WMO* Besl 
SRJ= (or Bis SB 1*3 Discs SI S9 00 



Circle Reader Service Number ZS6 



119 





Shareware 
to Meet Your 
Every Need 

Libris Britannia CDROM 

From ihe besi British 
shareware library, over 600 
megabytes of superb public 
domain and shareware for the 
IBM PC. This disc is biaised 
towards the technical and 
scientific PC user and 
includes extensive sections on electronics, 
engitieering. mathematics, medicine, statistics, 
ham radio and other specialist areas. Libris 
Britannia comes with a 124 page book 
describing each software packase. "viade in 
March 1993 .T-.^SBQ-gS* 

Giga Games CDROM 

This disc features an amazing 

collection of games, from 

classic arcade to the lastest 

windows simulations to 

educational jzanies for all 

ages. Mah Jong Tile sets. 

sports games, trivia games, 

word games, war games, visual enieriainmcnt, 

BBS door,s and more, A vast assortment of 

ulilllies and "cheat sheets'" for commercial arid 

shareware games h included. BBS ready. 

Made in June 1<J93 S39.95'* 

CICA IVIS Windows CDROIW 

This disc contains a copy of 
CIC,^. the internet's largest 
Windows ftp site, with 
hundreds of megabytes of MS 
Windows programs. Includes 
all sorts of utilities, games, 
demos (for Window-s prog- 
rams I. fonts and font viewing and design 
programs, source code, printer and monitor 
drivers, programming !ools and a whole lot 
more! Updated quarterly, the current edition is 
new in April 199.1, Yearly subscriptions 
available. BBS index files S24.95' 

Simtel lUISDOS CDROM 

Packed full of the world's 

highest quality MSDOS 

shareware — every DOS user 

should own this diskl Simtel 

contains something for 

everyone, with over 9,000 

files. Our friendly shell 

program will help you find whatever you need. 

whether ii be utilities, communications 

programs. BBS's, editors, documentation, 

databases, elq. BBS index files. Last quarterly 

update in .May 199.1 S24.95' 

CDROM Caddies S4.95 

" Shareware programs requirs separate 
payment to authors if found useful. 

-cH^, AMEX/ViSA/MC/COD 

^J^k^^"^ 1-800-786-9907 

^ FAX 1-510-674-0821 

info@cdrom.com 

S5 S&H per order (in USA, Canada and Mexico) 
S10 overseas 1-5 10-674-0783 

All ottr disks 
are unconditionally 

guaranteed. 

Walnut Creek CDROM 

4041 Pike Lane, Suite D 
Concord, CA 94520 






\7a 



'ALUE Software 

"Check" Us Out 

The Best Shareware 
On The Planet 

V Windows/Games/Fonts 

V Multimedia/Graphics 

V Educational/Utiiities 

V Desktop Publishing 

V Business Applications 

V New User Start Up Kits 

IBM Compatible/Virus Free/ASP Member 

FREE Catalog, Call 



800-824-0413 



Circle Reader Service Number 127 



^filKlllME^ 



• IBM - AMIGA - C64 

• Send list for speedy reply 

• Top Prices Paid 

• Convert titles you've beaten 
or grown tired of to CASH or 
trade credit (20% more)! 

• Call or write for free catalog 
(specify computer) 



940 4th Ave #222 Huntington WV 25701 

1-800-638-1123 

Buiietin Board for complete list: 3O4-.'i29-705O 




circle Reader Service Number 189 



55Tie j^I^tsR Outfa^v 



mH ft^finKXKl Ave SuLoi lUiAd. NT 10112 



The Ami.sh Outlaw 10 Most Wanted 



1 S^r Wta<ij -*Mq»ocntMbcnrffatf«dm3iJj*a«ja*wdMi»«ii.-^»« 

L MaJgrStnthtr -MimrikMymc-jiipimtfartiApy^ Uy».S>vtw^ 
miMm ■ tPdcKin)' ihcml klj*n Md Mum hsM 1 TTtwhrMiii^jl V<Bb«^ (^i'CA){SB) 
3 ZOoct^- jnulh^t.irttachJia-brtaqdaitcDefcrJteA-ll^J'Ci. Vaipdrf^..- 
G^Va^dnujbl ^IMdcpR KTaJ!iiD£CXZi]bB££ncllMfi>Mnf«±Bi]%ti#iavn«(i,A 

tanA |\ GA) iSBi<tcy^^)i}a}^ (: Meg RAM) 

■amulaS (Enc fxigee htt ttt^ai to ddc (SDx^'<^A} 

*- 0*Trfallj - mncrncrtpqpJiKdiDat ^nop | wi "tirh] mi i^ffri] jiTwi ^fly 

pltnEi psan^ powtT » yw pmpis bixn filMet to pUna {VGA) (SU) 

■ [ijujlii: medkfv^ toorid luU i f iLmn ■iii ■tuii^iiii (VUA) {im^ r^ind] 
l. C'ttcemh Ah>l3 JD - *■ « a piwcrhJ >nzHd a it>bw ui ik^in it^ vhnrit 

cinrl unsni UiUit rtuf^Arlaat vcncn tod Iswlti^ttmtXfiait 6k t^tant*' 

lPC-llHilt4iYfiw™m)(rflA-VCA)ili»dDrTVEj 

8 Wolfftinka 3D -Yau m j KVt.' m Sl.ri rm^TTt,r,y Thcct?|«iu.iaaci(itfrwn 

pratMi DaalD]»il»£fas1-DpipJ]iciMlf»igiffl(.{VljAHSoualBUjUT) 

9. Mcga1ron -eag dv L^bynnti cccnbu jmw tiki bait dmn ttv >itv<rwy. rq>cTHiu 

Ofchi^ieri lotjcf ^miuil rca]iri ocfflbU IViilthle bi ilunnawc^ M; dtU (^-onpliy tn 

iB«lm)(VOA)(Hwd DtiviHm™" c?«kk(uI| (1 duLi) 

IO, CltCHOrid -CmUmKloHiatBKrtHlwiOOI{.U nu^iiiiw m KkHUfwdMilM 
pvatn.:attMtmpn*i\'fi/i}iS3) 

3r AND J.2r SAME nUC'K l-9DlSfcS&.00 tOAUPE» 
DWSHIFPtNa AlLANDtlSU 



CALL: 1-800-947-4346 

FOR FRflF. CATAl.OOUE 



Circle Reader Service Number 268 



IBM & MAC SOFTWARE 

CATALOG 

32 Pages! ASP Member 




SOFTSHOPPE, INC 

P.O. Box 247 

ARTESIA, CA 90701 
Tel: (310) 802-1333 
FAX: (310) 802-1494 



Toil-Free— 24 Hrs. 
1-800-851-8089 



Circle Reader Service Number 126 



T^hirts 
The Ultimate Soft-Wear! 

Many sayings, pictures, colors... 

• I've got the Computer Blues 

• The more people I meet, the more 
I like my computer 

• Upgrade Challenged! 

• I fought the LAN, & the LAS won I 

• Don't Panicl • When all else 
fails, read the manual ... 

Star Trek and SF t-shirts also. 

For more information please contact: 
HYPERUGHT ENTERPRISES 

1208 Duthie Avenue, 

Bumaby, BC Canada V5A 2R4 

T: (604) 420-1479 F: (604) 420-3891 

Wholesale Inquiries Welcome 




Circle neader Service Number 129 



Save BIG $$$ on 
printing costs 



Re-usable jet-printer recharge 
kits. Single and liilullicotor. 
Buy kit once, then just buy ink as 
needed. Costs as low as SI per 
rectiarge. from S29.95 

^^^^^ Re-ink your ribbon 
^^^^H|^ cartridges for less 

'^^^^^B^^H^ famous 

^^^^^ Over 21 0,000 sold 

Beautiful printing and longer printhead fife. 
Avg. cartridge can be re-inked 60-100 limes. 

Universal cartridge model 79.95 

Epson Maclnker .,,. ...49.95 

Multicolor Adapter (4-bancf ribbons) 40.00 

C&mituter Fiiends, Inc. 

Wl'MNVVSciL-MceRirk Drive ■ PorUand OR 97229 
ToOrJLT l-Hmi-547-.VW3 Tel, (5031 626-2291 



Circle Reader Service Number 254 





Learn Your Sotiware 
In Two Hours... Guapanleed! 

OUR CERTIFIED INSTRUCTORS TEACH YOU THE POWERFUL FEATURES OF YOUR SOFTWARE THROUGH THE ADVAN- 
TAGES OF VIDEO TRAINING- TRY ANY OF SOFWISION'S EASY-TO-FOLLOW VIDEOS AT NO RISK UNDER THE TERMS 
ON OUR UNCONDITIONAL 30.DAY MONET-BACK GUARANTEE. CALL, MAIL OR FAX YOUR ORDER TODAY. 



iNTIRWATIO«*t.L.C. 

1240 Ea-slSOQ North 

Orcra, Utah 84037 U.S.A. 



TO ORDER CALL 

! illlll S 4-VISIIIN 

(1-SO0-74S-4746) 

Canada: 1-800-5634069 

U.K.: 0793 849996 



VUa. MiisicrCardn AMEX. Money Orilcrji, Purchase Orders, 
anii chects acccptcil. PlCiisc inJiciitf viilio tiik. quantity, 
special offtr if applicable, shipping/ billing Jiddrcss, and phone 
number. .Ml urders protcs^ol jainc day as received. Add S6 firr 
.single tap* orders, S12 for muhipk [up lo 4| tape orders for 
shipping and Kindling- Uiiih rusidiiiits add 6.259( sales lax. 



WORDPERFECT SiX.O 12 lin. eil.l J 
I -tmrtHtiinitR 2-tnivmtt\lkltc 
Jf-Athtiturat J-Tifn ttttti 'IfU-k\ 

: Any 4 Ulh.-. M W.IS oi- .Single liilw^Vi'f.il? 
WORDPERFECT S.2/WIND0WS I.' Iir>. <•!.) 



All 4 Lapes-S I WW . ir Siniile Tajv-S, 

WORDPERFICT4.0 FOR OfFICB (2 /jr.. ni 
l-hilniiluiiiti: 2-Iii1tmititliilf 
.^•Ailniilct'il 4-Ti]>i tinii Irii Av 
Alt 4 lape^-SI W.95 w SinBlc Tapc-WJ ''^ 

WORDPERFECT S.I OR 5.0/BO»(2ftri. iii 
l-ItllrtHliliin^ 2-ftlU-rtniiIiiiU 

All 4 lupL-'.-SKi'J.'JS or Sinslc r ; 

WORDPERFECT FOR VMS 1 2 /trt r.i J 
l-hHrinJmitti; 2-tmt-nilr'ttuat 
S-Atlvttttifil -t^Tijn tutj Trit k.\ 
All 4 tapci S74'(.>»5 or StnglL TajK-S l<«.'*5 

WORDPERFECT FOR MAC (2 /in. eii.l 
l-Uilnttturmi: 2 filituju itioli- .i-AJviiMnt 
All 3 la|K-i-M I '(.'/.'; .11 SiiipU- TapcMy.M 

AN INTRODUCTION TO DOS t.t !<Miim. ti 
I-Fiiii Out- 2-i^tm /"lift .^'Ptirt ThTfi 
All .1 lapcs-SM'W! iir Single 'l'.ipc Sft'X'tf 



MICROSOFT WINDOWS rW/jiiin. ra.t 
/./'„;; (Jjir 2-/'iiil Awi f-l'iin'lhm 
All .1 iapcs-S14'/.')5 or Singk Tii[)c~S(>i).').'^ 

UNIX TUTORIAL DISKETTI (l.SM Sm.'li 

UNIX SYSTEMS ADMINISTRATION AND 
TROUBLE SHOOTING PISK (3.S'1 i'f>.')i 

WORKROOKS FOR VIDEO TRAININC 

PU'dW tttti tor (mliltthtf liltc. 



Circle Reader Service Number 1GS 



you r M ds 
New MATH game! 

MATH 

But Mith s retail pint of oiily ^25.95 i; 
won't tiiirs J tsois in your petkeibMl! 



M..Aj k 





1. 



■CfKTt „• 

Each i.if lilt- ijvf. levels have IIQ 
and exdtinjf castles lo exploiT 




Matcli the equations while -M 
dotigsng the fireballs in this ^ 
dazzling areade style game.-j 

iHention Kids Attention Parents 

• Face the fierce Dragon, Scorch • Helps kids improve addition, subtraction, 

• Creaie your own moat ntulttplication, and division skills 

• Track hJEh scores for conijHrin£i. Separate eqoanon and dextcriry controls 
widi friends allow kids of al! abilities In enjoy the gaioe 

■ Exijerience 2515 color animations * PrtAidcs positive rtinforcemijit 

• Gr^ial sound effects and muse * Low price, high quality K'i^nie by Landnurk 

Visit yijiir local Belailer or Cal l ..l-.afJ0.-^13? Jg^^ 

^ recdvo..^ ^ 

Kequii 



lliJ itemi 1i luiltbli fgr jait M.Ot) b| cilliij I-800-M3-7M7 



f^^^Bfe, Notebook computers 
^Hfl^ are great — except 
^v^ when it comes to playing 
simulation and action 
games. That's because rliey 
doiu come equipped with a 
game port.^ Introducing die 
Parallel Game Port"" from 
Genovadon. The PGP turns 
your notebook 
into a game- 
book by con- 
verting the 
computer's printer 

J port into a "virTu;d 

= game port". With 

J PGP, you also get 

I a gender changer 

i adapter, which lets 

- you connect a joy- 



STICK IT 
TO YOUR 

niOTEBOOK. 





stick, yoke, pjcdals or even 
a weapon sytems con- 
troller to your notebook 
or desktop DOS PC. 
The PGP is an indispens- 
able aoHsoiy for iixky's serious 
gamer. Whether you race a 
car, fly combat, tnaneuver a 
tank, or wing along at 
100 knots, die 
PGP's .software 
features will 
enhance your 
^ play action. Look for 
I the Parallel Game 
_ Port in the software 
''*: section of your 
nearest computer 
dealer. Or call us at 
(800) 822-4333. 



OENO^ATIONM 



Genovation, Inc. ▼ 17741 Mirchdl North ▼ Irvine. CA 92714 
(714) 833-3355 » F.« (714) 833-0322 ' Sain: (800) 822-4333 



Circle Reader Service Number 22S 



Floppy & CD ROM Products 

OlSJiJilflS- l:;nll "H iildiiik'S 
25 lolor pji.'lun.'s, piclurc 
vifwor FRIiK wTirsi iiriliT, 

use *,SfW, •.Illfli.J.W ]. 1 ttlj; il,,!. JHi 

• #,vIO Smiipkr. j! v.m, _S.^9.95 

^#3-15 Exniitii nilor S.i9.9S 

i-19l!orisV;illiio $.li).05 

*3-r l)<nvn I iidcts S.iy.'JS 

r>l> I mm Ikliiud — $39.')5 
;#3-14 Costumes & F/\.Si9.95 

i ^ Swimsuil \.\ a>.ROM 
OiiT 200 hot 8-bi( & 
24-bii cDlor Iniagi'^! 
»3-46 S90.<),'i 

Nightwaicli K 

Interactive 

ou CD-ROM 
Inicrartlosceihc 

I'ttilic c$cii])ades of 

aittilLs c3U}itU in Oil- 

act. f.i-Fl') S6y.95 
FREE color uncensored 
w/purehase or seniJ SZ.OIH 
BodyCellD P.O. Box 910531, - 
Sorrento VarieyCA9Z191 ^ 

Order: 1 -800-922-3SS6 Info: ei 9-57S-E9S9 

FAX: 619-536-2397 Include S4-7S for s/h 

foreign add $ias/h CA.resitlents add sales tax 

Oealei Inquires WcJccrnL- 

1 -800-922-3556 

MUSTEEOVUKTDinillEII 



Circle Reader Service Number 2tB 



THE AMERICAN HEART 

AS5CEUTION 
MEMORIAL PROGRAM. 



^American Heart Association 

This space provided as a public service. 



WhereAdults 
Come To Play: 



m Local Numbos Covolng TOO US. Cltlcsl 

■ CB-St)^e Group aai Private ChaO 

■ loco's Of Shareware Pro©Timsl 

■ Bustncss and Personal Scrvlccsl 

■ Ttavd & Fll^t Scheduling with OAGI 

■ Giant Message Foruma & Classlficdsl 

■ Uve MulUplayer Gaines! 

. a Matchmaker Dating Databasel 

■ Designed For Adult Uscial 

For SiGffUF, More Information, Or A 
Local Nvmber Near You Call 

818-358^968 

Bt Modem, a/N/i-s/ia/24oo baud 



i* 



» *jJS5^ ]w 




% 



C D ROMS 



ALL CATEGORIES 
BUSINESS-GAMES-CLIPART-GRAPHICS 
RELIGION-EDUCATIONAL-HEALTH- 
LARGE ADULT LIBRARY (over 21) 

DISCOUNT PRICES 

CALL FOR LATEST USTINGS 

1-800-757-7778 

VISA-MASTERCAROMONEY ORDER 

MOST ORDERS SHIPPED 24 HRS. 

P.O. BOX 216. LAfONTAlNE, IN 469« 



Circle Reader Service Number 121 



□ 

MUiVL 

SHAREWARE CATALOGUE 

/ Over 3500 Programs 

/ Latest Versions 

/ Guaranteed Vims Free 

• Free 278 Page Catalogue 

(On High DentJty Dttk unleu Specified Othsrwita) 



(519)825-9236 
(800) 563-6647 
(519) 825-3780 (Fax) 
(519) 825.7480 (BBS) 



SHAREWARE 
CENTRAL 

P.O. Box 897, Wheatley, Ontario NOP 2P0 



Circle Reader Service Numlwr 171 



un 



Home Entenainment 
Organizer 

Computerize your Video, Audio, and 
Book Libraries wilh this advanced 
database soHware for IBM. Searcti by 
multiple criteria. Instantly chajige »rt 
order. Then print personalized labels or 
reports with a keystroke. Indispensable 
for the serioiu video or audiophile. 

Now only $49.95 

+ $3. S&H. 

30 Day FREE TRIAL 

Pay only after you test drive HEO on your 
own computer, or return it for lull credit. 

To order call 
1-800-238-2154 anytime. 



REMOVE 
HARDWAI^E LOCKS 



PROTECT YOUR INVESTMENT! 
MAINTAIN PRODUCTIVITY! 

Software utility ttiat allows for 
the removal o( hardware locks. 

Available for most major 

CAD/CAM and PCB 

software programs 

Easy - Simple - Guaranteed 
Programs start at $99.00 U.S. 

visa and Mastercard Welcome 
Call or Fax fur mon.- Inromiation 



SafeSoft Systems Inc. 
201 - U n Munroe Ave. 
Winnipeg, Mb. Canada 



PH (204)669-4639 
FAX(304)668-3566 
R2K 3Z5 



Circle Reader Service Number 312 



25,000 SHAREWARE 
PROGRAMS $ 



ON 4 CD-ROMs 2«t. 

LATEST '93 EDITION - f or *1 50 
30 DAY MONEY BACK GUARANTEE 

More programs than tver Ijelordlf Windows Applnalions., 
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rits... Educational Aids ,. DeskTop Publishing even 
OS/2... Word Processors... Utilillet lor Prinlers Frits 
Keyboard S err; en, Cliparl, SpreadsheeU.. Communica. 
trons... Photographs. ,, CAD... Music... in short - pfo. 

a rams for any applicalion vou i:arr imagrr^er 
niquc tISTER PROGRAM alloms you Is ejtlfy actesi ANY 
PROGRAM, IN ANY CATEGORY, in juil Htonds-loarJil 
onto|uurHD,3nr)i«rhenyou'retlnislied, irlherleeiiitonlhiHa 
or do Uie hlusekeeprrg lo keep your HD uKluUereri arih pro- 
grams yoLjmay use only infrequently. 
oven i GIGABYTES - 25,000 PROGRAMS-THE BEST 

smueware md host wimble data youu ever 

flNO!INOCLUBStnj(iiii...l!omor:thtfdawillMdingtttl..ifs 
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iviilibit mthh stcaidslll YOU CANT FIND A WIDER 
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ANYWHERE ELSEI LATEST '93 EDITION 
ORDER YOURS TODAY BUSH «a9 ♦ 19 S/H, 
CASH, CHECK, MOHEY ORDER! CODi OK! 

DEALERS WANTED 

CROSLEY SOFTWARE 
BOX 276, ALBURG, VT 05440 

Fax: (514) 345-8303 Tel: (514) 739-9328 



Circle Reader Service Number 226 



Stereo / 4-Op 
'"<%* Support 
" Memory- 
Resident 
Pop-up Tool 

ROL, CMF, 
MIDI File 
Formats 

Program 
I/FToo 

Instrument 
Editor 

The Prentier Music Playback Tool 
Every sound board user needs Wiiistle. 

Play music all day while you work. 

Use your sound board. You paid for it. 

No music experience required. 

Patcli Panel Software 

11590 Seminole Blvd. 

Largo, PL 3464S 

VISA 813-397-3530 MC 




Circle Reader Servir:e Number 141 



Circle Reader Service Number 145 



Circle Reader Service Number 186 



hat Do PC JefJodRteys Want? 

Hair-Raising Sorties • "^ 
eath Defying Man 
nieroics 
/ictory 
=lealism ^ . 
HOTAS™ 



NEW PRODUCT 




The Mark II WCS™ 
(Programmable Throttle; 
Also Allows you to 
Program your Joystick) 





FCS™ (Joystick) 




0150 S.W. Nimbus^ve. Suite E-7 



OR. 97223 PHONE C5D3*«39-3200 FAX (503)620-8094 



RCS'*' (Rudder Pedals) 



circle Reader Service Number 147 



FREE! 

Download the HOTTEST & SEXIEST Images 
from our ADULT On-Une Magazine ' FREE! 

Ju4(SC is an Adult On-Llne Magazine that 
offers you: 

• ORIGINAL Adult GIF Images not 
available on any other BBSI 

• GORGEOUS, Sexy & Exotic Models 
both Amateur and Professional ! 

• QUALITY Adult GIF Images and VGA 
Movies produced by professionals ! 

• HIGH SPEED access available on 
ALL lines (14.4k down to 1200 baud). 

Set your Modem to B-N-l and your 
terminal to ANSi Graphics and dial: 

(818) 709 - 4275" 

OusitloniT Ctll our volca Una il (tit) 7a«-37S$. 

cJL ^ L- C^ 

the on-line adult magazine 

Wu5l b» 1B Y»a;a of A^e a OlCsr ' Umrtod Offor 

I'm Chriity, the Systemt Admin- 
ittritor ind pirt tinw Slinuxir 
Medel an LACE. Com* & let mf 
ImtgM & Viiit «ith ma On-Liiw. 

Circle Reader Service Number 173 



FACT: 

Adding 

■ 



as a 

second 

color 

can 

increase 

response 

by more 

than 






[^^ i& 




Ela"niiiifiiiik'r,i 

TER! WElULL/ 



STARglWARE 

■' ! Introducing the First 
■;■ Adult Photo CD 
:'- Special introductory 
V Price of SI 29, 

^' saveS70 

;. See ex-Playboy 

Playmate. Teri 
w^: Weigei. in the first 
^ adult Photo-CD, Enjoy 
, .js^', these live action 

T^- ' images, photographed 
'* ■". during the filming of this 
critically acclaimed 
' movie. 

Experience the hottest trend 
in odult entertoinment. Photo- 
J CD technology tal<es adult CD- 
■" ROIVIs to on exciting new level of 
superb quality imagery. Discover 
, the power of Photo-CD! 

Windows, DOS and tVIAC versions 
ovoitoble. Other titles available, 
Must be 21 toorder- 

ORDER HOTLINE * ' 

k (800) 354-5353 

V Fox (305: 426-9801 BBS (3C6) 428-M 1 2 

Dealer inquiiies: {305><126-4»2 




FHtE Kodak's Photo 
CD Access Software 



Photo CD Symbol is a Iradema/k ol 
Kadok used under license 



Circle Reader Service Number 130 



SeXXy Software 

SeXXv DISKS" 



SeXXcapades" - . . The CAME 

The First Aduft Game with TRUE SOUND 

and 2S6 Color VGA Graphics 

The garrte eveiyone has been wa:lLng lor, FoJ ihat evening ^Qj wori'l !of get wjin a loved one or group ol ^wy dose 
Inends. FlJMI youf se»ual dg&iies. Find wjr how jroup panner woifSd le^ly like to make love I Over @0 Color VGA Scenes - 
Real Voces Guide the Action ■ Foreplay Opljon ■ Play wilh 2-8 Close Friends. Nort suppons SoijndBkistw"' cards! 
i79 - SatciJl OHei: SS9 with purchjse ol any CC disk / VGA and ^ard aisk recuirEd - shipped on high density disks 



SeXXy Software' 

SeXXv CD-ROMS- 



CONNOISSEUR COLLECTION ALL NEW! In 256 Color VGA!! 

ALL n-.ov es have sound - play ih'u standard speaker 01 Sojnd&'asler'" 
SeJJy Hilt ICC1 • * YOU BE WE STAR tllie FfflST CUSTOMIZABLE mora allow you lo wnle Itio ftalDj and llio IIIC 
SeXXf aiik ICC2 • THE FIRST SOUra MOVE! The lire! computer mo»ie with SOUND See the inccedible 256 color VSA atjpttics whik; 

hsanno llw .Klual dialij OURS EXCLUSIVELV 
SeX]()i Oiik ICC3 • THE BE&T MOVIE! The best compulcr mowie available Only lor Itie senojs CDllcctor, 255 slunnino VGA colors 
SflXX)- Diik *CC4 ' VOLUPTUOUS MOVIE with Sound! Scr; and hejr a symphony □! ekccptonally diopoljoncd worrwi 
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Prices: J A-fOL^re S29. 3 Movies SG5. 5 Movies S9^ 



NEW'.'. Exclusively imported from Europe.'.' 256 Color VGA Games 

SGfl PORNTHIS ■AdL:ltversiono[thepopulargame. You reveal a hidden movie wh lie contrdiling blocks tallinfl down 
yout screen, Multiple levels. MUST SEE! 

SG5 PORMPIPE ■ Adult version of Pipe lor Wind mt (Windows not teduiied) - Multiple movies revBalcd as the oame pro- 
grcsscs HOURS OF FUm 

SG6 MOZAIK - Adult jiBsaw piiHles with over K celebnt/ piclures - you leassenbie Ihe most eiciting immen on earth 
Price; $35 each or all 3 for S89 



ORIGINAL SeXXy DISKS - 6 disk set with movies, pictures, games S32 



ADD S4 SH ■ 3,5- Or FOREIGN ORDERS ADD S^DISK ■ IN PA ADD TAX ■ MUST STATE ASE OVER 21 YEARS, 

VISA/MC Orders Only: 800-243-1515 Ext. 600FJ 1 24HRS I 7 DAYS 

FAX (2151997-257T • Or CKMO to: Se«y Software, P.O, Boi 220, Depl. eOCFJ. Hatfield, PA 19440 



FREE $99 Shareware CD-ROM 

Aiti purchase ol any 3 CD-POMS Itol a cheap demo dsk - contains thousands of valuable uro- 
graTO in all catagdoes - aantes. windows, business , cd jcaticki 



SeXXy FLIX 

Full Length Digital Movies - Ours Exclusively! 
KING DONG - The dirtiest dinosaur mou;e f^ct rrade ■ CRYSTAL HOLIAMD slars nfllh prehtstonc 

moristers, cannibals, and bis of special ehepts 
TOO NAUGtfry TO SAY no - harry REEMS and GirjGEfl LYNN star in an erotic daydream 

.n a fitardino Khool for oi^s - Irom CABAtLERO HOME VIDEO, dir SUZi RANDALL 
SEX GAMES - Wheh a haccer taps inio a computer dating service he is able to program Ihe 

wildc^l lanlasies ol its semesl mambei - SAUNA GRAWT slai^ 
SoKXcBpades . . . The MOVIE - Sec incrediDIc uses of a mouse and a loystick as a group of 

Iticnds play our popular ScX)!capadcs garrv: 

NO HARD DISK SPA CE REQUIRED -WINDOWS NOT REQUIRED 



S&XXy CD- ROMS 

SeRXy CD #1 ihe premere adiill XXX collecbdn - 6BD MB of aclioc with: 5268 VGA pictures 87 

movies, &74 sidries, games DARcTO COMPARE! 
SeXXyCDtfZan e*cfi£r\« ccrflecSon contairjng rmt 90O Super VGA piclLires [1 024 x 768 x 256) and 

mcr400 VGA iKtuirs l640i 4B0 x 256) Thest are piclliES Ihal cannot be Inird an^/vihcre Use' The 

women and Ihe quaiilyare Kurming 
SaX Xy CD il anolher collection cl over 650 MB of the hottest prclurcs available Over 5,000 VGA 

diclurcs. movies and utilities Ihal will have vou spendina da>s lust living lo see it alt' 
MENU DRIVEN VIEWING - NO DUPLICATION 



MIX & MATCH CD-ROMS / SeXXy PIX^** 

BUSTY BABES ■ eCSTACY • ASIAN LA0lE5.riOTPIX23i4-PCPIXl 213 

TROPICAL GIRLS ■ STOH.1.13 • EROTIC GIfllS ■ TH HEAVEN ■ EROTIC ENCOUNTERS 

AD JLT PALEHE • MY PflMTE COlECTlOfl t 42 • AMUATON FANTASIES 1 4J • PORKV/AHE 



ALL CD-ROMS: First 3: S99 eacll or 3 for S199 IP -s FREE Sinrtwur. CDflOMi 
Then: S69eachor3lpr$149 



GAIL HOWARD'S 

SMART LUCK"" 

SCIENTIFIC LOTTERY SYSTEMS 



Won 39 Lotto Jackpots 
Worth $79.2 Million Dollais! 

ADVANTAGE PLUS'" iod COMPUTER WHEEL'" 

ADVANIAtE PLUS'" - COMPLETE drawing results for ALL 59 
pick 5. 6, 4 7 S LDlto games FflEE * Over 50 sdsniitic charts 4 
roferts to ZBro in on wlnnais • Automahc SMART PICKS" soleds 
tidst Lolto ts instarilly • Test past pdrlormanco ol SMART 
PICKS'" wilh one key slrolie! • Kpags manual on disk shows 
how !o Uenljfy wirtning paltems • A $295.00 value. 
COMPUlEt WHEtl'" - Has 2S2 Lotto Wheeling Systems with 
spedfic win guarantees. All flawless. Find one system that fails 
its win guarantee, and you get DOliBLE yoijr money back! 
BOTH for only $99.95 + $3 S/H 
(IBM/Comp. 5,25 or 3.5) 



USE THIS SYSTEM AND VOU WILL TRASH 
ALL YOUR OTHEK LOTTERY SOFTWARE! 



A C«OVTfV WINNER! ■ DONISETTIE FOR LESS. 

1-800- 876 -4245 
SMART LUCK' Software 

[JepL C-IO, P.O. Box 1519 ■ While Plains. NY 106O2 
^ 1-30M7&GAIL (4245) Of 914-761-2333 

Circle Reader Service Number 109 



Circle Reader Service Number 116 



For IBM/MS-DOS: 



MICROPROSE »1t.50 EACH 



MID WINTER. PUNISHER 
SWORD OF THE SAMURAI. 

FLAMES OF FREEDOM, 
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LIGHTSPEEE). HYPERSPEED. 



LJVND, SEA4AIRBUNDLEII 
ONLYt19.S0 

Includes: Piralos!, Airborne 
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MICROPROSE SPECIAL 

YourCho icir $25 each 

GUNSHIP 2000 

F-IITA STEALTH FIGHTER 



ADULTS ONLY FUN 

Sex Vdrens from Spaci? SH 50 

Sex Olympics SI 6.50 



CREDIT CARD ORDERS 
K5 MINIMUM 

1 eooBye-esiG 

Orders Only, please! 



SIERRA DEALS »20 EACH 
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OF CHINA, RISE OF THE 
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SPACE QUEST 1.2 -or- 3. 



A-10 TANK KILLER, HEART OF 
CHINA L STELLJVR 7 BUNDLE 
ALL 3 SI ERRA GAIrtES ,,S30 



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Games, Impossible Mission 2, 

TurtK) Champions, DouWe 
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SAMUIS08ISPO.CA 93*03 



WE ALSO CAFIAV APPLE. MAC. C64|t2B, AMIGA. ATARI K MORE 
To order, send nhdc't or mone)' orde/ la thie abcwc address. Calito/nia orders 
rrusi tncluda 7.25% salai lax. All ordera must inclutte ihippirvg charges of 
S5 loc U.S.A., Sfl for CanadB, or il5 lor Internaiiona!. Fcr :ur cjflipfeie 
cataJraseittt 2 in U.S. post Bgaitanpscr cash. Acalalogi5Mfil FREE wilh 
anyoraer. Be sure lospecifwoi^rcwrputer type SdiiVstHHl'ieriDrdEring. 
For ill rnquiriss & additionil Jafernuition, ci!) |GD5) 544-6616. 



PENDRAGON 
Software Library 



Public Domain/Shareware for 

IBM & Compatibles 

ASP Member 

No Viruses * Latest Versions 

Over 2500 Programs 

FREE 80 page Catalog 

We also carry CD-ROM discs 

Premier Siiareware CD • 1 Gig - $29.00 
Desktop Publishers Dream Disk + Book 
650 Megs of Fonts and Clipart - $45.00 

75 MeadowbrookRd 
E.Greenwicli, Rl 02818 



1-800-828-DISK 



Circle Reader Service Number 150 



ReDity . . . for our extensive 

selection of software 
at low, reastinable 
rates 

Set , . . Iiir tlioiisaniis cif tilies 
fur your l]!M, Amig.i, 
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This publication is available 
in microform from UMI. 

600-521-06(10 loll-free 

313-761-470D collect from Alaska and Michigan 

800-343-5299 toll-free from Canada 



SOFTWARE 



THE LOVERS GAME For open minded adults 

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CLASSIFIEDS 




SOFTWARE 



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How To Get 

A High-Paying 

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COMPUTER 
PROGRAMMING 



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^ HIH ^^ ^^ ^^ ^^ ^^ ^^ ^^ ^ 

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Circle Reader Service Number 353 



Closing date for November classifieds 

is August 15, 
Call/Fax your ad (516) 757-9562 



NEWS BITS 



Jill Champion 



Safe computing, 

Big Blue periplierals, 

the endangered 

desktop, computer 

ethics, and 

favorite brands 



Computing for AIDS 

What better way to practice 
safe computing ttian witin 
a . . , er . . . computer con- 
dom? Priced at a mere $10, 
Thie Computer Condom is ac- 
tually ThunderByle Anti-Virus 
software combined with a gi- 
ant novelty condom, pack- 
aged to look like the real 
thing (only a lot bigger). Soft- 
ware manufacturers Interna- 
tional Business Saveware and 
fvlisno designed The Comput- 
er Condom to make the asso- 
ciation between responsible 
behavior and safe computing. 
Sales have been phenome- 
nal, according to Software Re- 
source, the product's distribu- 
tor, mostly as gag gifts, but 
the biggest draw for buyers is 
that the companies involved 
are donating 10 percent of 
sales proceeds to AIDS re- 
search — and that's no gag. 

Greatest Thing Since Color 

You know what onscreen pro- 
gramming did for your VCR; 
now Optiquest is promising 
the same for your computer 
monitor, The 4000DC monitor 
(scheduled to ship in Septem- 
ber) with onscreen program- 
ming and a color-matching 
system gives you a video 
readout as you make each 
monitor adjustment. The color- 
matching system allows you 
to adjust color intensity — mak- 
ing reds hotter and blues cool- 
er — just as you would with 
your TV screen. 

Big Blue Options 

The once-eiite IBfvl, finally hear- 
ing the 1990s caii to arms — 
"Competition!" — is now at- 
tempting a major push into 
the retail computer-accesso- 
ries market. Its new Easy Op- 
tions line of peripherals and 
accessories for IBM and com- 
patibte computers includes au- 
dio cards, video cards, game 
cards, modems, joysticks, key- 
boards, mice, trackballs, hard 
drives, floppy drives, CD-ROM 
128 COMPUTE OCTOBER 1993 



drives, tape drives, power sup- 
plies, and scanners. Look for 
it all in your local computer- 
supply store. 

Check It Out 

Compton's NewMedia, which 
several months ago decided 
to buck the status quo and of- 
fer CD-ROM titles for rent in 
video stores, says its rental 
program is booming, and the 
company is expanding the 
number of titles for rent as 
well as moving into more vid- 
eo stores. Based on that suc- 
cess, Compton's plans to of- 
fer select CD-ROM titles to 
public libraries for lending. 
The specially marked series 
will include general reference, 
music, travel, children's, and 
business titles. 

The 180-Day Wonder 

Buying a computer has be- 
come more iike buying a can 
According to the July 1993 is- 
sue of Adweek's Marketing 
Computers, when the Boston 
Computer Exchange broke its 
10-year monthly sales record 
a few months ago, "half of the 
approximately $500,000 month- 
ly sales volume consisted of 
new computers that are dis- 
continued models and liquidat- 
ed retail stock from local 
stores." According to one an- 
alyst cited in the article, "The 
typical life cycle for a desktop 
computer is now six months," 
which means that "this sum- 
mer's computer models will 
probably be liquidated as dis- 
continued merchandise by 
Christmas." As with autos, 
smart shoppers will find the 
best buys on those 1993 mod- 
els at the end of 1993. 

The Commandments 

The Computer Ethics Insti- 
tute, a nonprofit research, ed- 
ucation, and study organiza- 
tion founded in 1992. propos- 
es the following "Ten Com- 
mandments of Computer Eth- 
ics" as a voluntary code of 



conduct for all users of com- 
puter technology and digital 
electronic data systems: 

1. Thou shall not use a 
computer to harm other 
people. 

2. Thou Shalt not interfere 
with other people's com- 
puter work. 

3. Thou Shalt not snoop 
around In other people's 
computer files. 

4. Thou shalt not use a com- 
puter to steal. 

5. Thou shait not use a 
computer to bear false 
witness. 

6. Thou shalt not copy or 
use proprietary software 
for which you have not 
paid. 

7. Thou shalt not use other 
people's computer resourc- 
es without authorization or 
proper compensation. 

8. Thou Shalt not appropri- 
ate other people's intellec- 
tual output. 

9. Thou Shalt think about the 
social consequences of 
the program you are writ- 
ing or the system you are 
designing. 

10. Thou Shalt always use 
a computer in ways that 
ensure consideration and 
respect for your fellow 
human. 

Pulling Rank 

Brandweek magazine recent- 
ly listed the 100 favorite 
brands in the U.S., reporting 
Total Research's 1993 Equi- 
Trend Survey. How did com- 
puter-related companies do? 
Very well indeed, reflecting 
how strongly computer compa- 
nies have moved into every- 
day life. In a list populated by 
the likes of Crest and Tylenol, 
IBM Personal Computers 
ranked number 20, followed 
by WordPerfect (34), Micro- 
soft (40), Kodak PhotoCD Sys- 
tem (47), Apple Computer 
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34 iS X 

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IT 38 39 « 

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FREE catalog tells more . . . 
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Schools 

McGraw-Hill Continuing Education Center 
4401 Connecticut Avenue, W 
Washington, DC 20008 fg r -m 

IBM is a rerislered Irademark of Iniernailonal Business 
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